October 2018

October 2018

OCTOBER 2018 | VOLUME 34 | NUMBER 10 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

34 FINANCE

Leveraging Construction Financing

The ins and outs of finding the right loan
By Tracy Barbour
8 INSURANCE

The Exorbitant Cost of Healthcare in Alaska

Health insurance and the bottom line
By Tracy Barbour
14 HEALTHCARE

Electronic Health Records Improve One Step at a Time

Providers optimistic about future of health communication
By Vanessa Orr
18 TELECOM & TECH

No Road Necessary

E-commerce provides opportunity to conduct business statewide
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
26 TRANSPORTATION

No Port No Problem

Alaska’s plane and barge driven rural shipping industry
By Sam Friedman
38 OIL & GAS

Where Does All That Oil Go?

Looking downstream at Alaska’s oil
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
46 ALASKA NATIVE

Enterprising Entrepreneurs

Creative business in rural Alaska
By Julie Stricker
122 ENVIRONMENTAL

The Best Soil Remediation Tools Available

Prevention, awareness, andinnovation
By Judy Mottl
126 EDUCATION

Planning for the Future

What gets workers farther: traditional degrees or the school of life?
By Samantha Davenport
118 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Playing the Game

The benefits of corporate team building
By Vanessa Orr

TOP 49ERS SPECIAL SECTION

About the Cover

Annually in October we publish our list of Top 49ers, Alaskan-owned companies ranked by revenue. We change the theme from year to year primarily so we can celebrate the many attributes the Top 49ers embody that lead to success (and in part to keep editorial on their toes). With Alaska taking a deep breath and pulling itself out of a down economy, now more than ever we see the need to emphasize the value of teamwork, the importance of talent, and the sweet satisfaction of triumph.

Cover by David Geiger

104 FEATURED 49ER

Alaska Village Electric Cooperative

The nation’s largest electric utility retail cooperative
By Arie Henry
108 FEATURED 49ER

Anchorage Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

Miles ahead of the pack
By Arie Henry
112 FEATURED 49ER

Koniag

Values first and poised for growth
By Tasha Anderson
116 FEATURED 49ER

Construction Machinery Industrial

Equipping Alaska’s industries
By Tasha Anderson
94 ON THE FIELD

The 2018 Top 49ers Line Up

Departments

Volume 34, #10

Published by Alaska Business
Publishing Co. Anchorage, Alaska

Editorial Staff

Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 [email protected]

Associate Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]

Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2906 [email protected]

Art Director
David Geiger
257-2916 [email protected]

Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 [email protected]

Photo Contributor
Judy Patrick

BUSINESS STAFF

President
Billie Martin

VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 [email protected]

VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 [email protected]

Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 [email protected]

Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 [email protected]

Accounting Manager
Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 [email protected]

Customer Service Representative
Emily Olsen
257-2914 [email protected]

501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard,Suite 100 Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577
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From the Editor

A Lighter, Brighter Alaska Business

W

elcome to the new Alaska Business magazine. The entire Alaska Business team is incredibly proud to present this lighter, brighter design. Take a moment to flip through the pages. Go ahead. It’s beautiful.

As you’ve seen, we’ve added breathing room within the text for a more comfortable reading experience. We also added space to make room for additional images of Alaska’s stunning vistas, the unique people who live and work here, and the industries that help support us all. Another exciting addition to the magazine is a new feature called “Off the Cuff,” which, in keeping with our theme of light and bright, offers a more personal, fun look at the lives of some of the state’s most prominent executives. If you’ve ever wondered what your company’s CEO does during his or her off time, you’ll love Off the Cuff.

Clearly, it’s been a very busy time for us at Alaska Business and we have no intention of slowing down. In recent months we launched the Alaska Business Monitor, our weekly newsletter featuring exclusive industry insight written by experts from Alaska’s most vital industries, as well as current news affecting the state’s business community (if you haven’t signed up yet, visit akbizmag.com/Sign-up-Alaska-Business-Monitor).

Kathryn Mackenzie
Managing Editor, Alaska Business

Insurance

The Exorbitant Cost of Healthcare in Alaska

Health insurance and the bottom line

By Tracy Barbour

E

ver-evolving regulations, escalating costs, and other challenges can make it difficult for businesses to provide health insurance benefits for their employees. The situation is having an adverse effect on their bottom line, leading some employers to forgo offering insurance or to at least consider the possibility of dropping the benefit.

A primary factor impacting the cost of health insurance is the high cost of medical care. Alaska has some of the most exorbitant healthcare costs in the country—and world—and employers cover the bulk of that burden. In Alaska, the cost of many medical procedures is twice as high as in the Lower 48 on average, according to Jeff Roe, CEO of Premera, which operates in both Washington and Alaska.

“While the consumer price index is about 6 percent higher here, payments to doctors and hospitals in Alaska are 76 percent higher than nationwide averages, and, after accounting for cost of living, are increasing twice as fast as inflation,” Roe said in his July 2018 speech at the 3-Year Outlook Luncheon of the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation.

Healthcare

Electronic Health Records Improve One Step at a Time

Providers optimistic about future of health communication

By Vanessa Orr

Eleven Alaska hospitals are on board Collective Medical Technologies’ Emergency Department Information Exchange (EDIE), which is designed to reduce unnecessary emergency department visits while making sure that patients get the right care in the right place. Collective EDIE is at the core of the Collective platform; the colored hexagons across the middle represent the links between different branches of healthcare and how they work within the platform.

I

t’s ironic that “on paper” the idea of electronic health records (EHRs), which provide an easy way for physicians, hospital systems, and patients to keep track of a person’s medical history, makes a lot of sense. In practice, however, the process of creating a database where these records are safely and efficiently available to everyone who should have access (and protected from those who should not) has not been without its share of problems.

The good news is that while there have been some difficulties, the majority of health providers in Alaska are moving toward a system that will enable more complete medical information to get into the hands of care providers more quickly while making it easier and more convenient for patients to see test results, pick up prescriptions, and travel around the state without having to carry their medical information with them.

“While we went live with our first EHRs in 1998 and still use the same vendor for our main facility, it doesn’t look anything like it did twenty years ago,” says Kirsten Kincaid, RN, manager of clinical applications at Bartlett Regional Hospital in Juneau. “We’ve gone through many upgrades to improve functionality.”

Telecom & Tech

Alaska-made products, such as Black Espresso Packaroons by Heather’s Choice, can often be easily packaged and shipped as part of an e-commerce business.

Heather’s Choice

No Road Necessary

E-commerce provides opportunity to conduct business statewide

By Isaac Stone Simonelli

T

he Last Frontier’s massive, transient population of military personnel, its rural geography, and its depth and breadth of artisan products makes it a prime location for the development of e-commerce businesses.

“Alaska and Alaska products—particularly quality artisanal products—have cache. This also holds true for cloud funding, tourism, and across other e-commerce platforms,” says Juliet Shepherd, who is currently looking at the scalability of businesses in the Interior as part of her job as the project manager of technology-led development and cold weather testing for the Fairbanks Economic Development Corporation (FEDC). “Everyone and their mother wants to engage with Alaska businesses. Alaska is very high profile right now—and particularly accessible for someone wanting to engage in e-commerce.”

The Enterprise Guide to Global Ecommerce anticipates about a 246 percent increase in worldwide e-commerce sales, from $1.3 trillion in 2014 to $4.5 trillion in 2021. Among the mammoths growing the e-commerce market are familiar names such as Amazon, eBay, Groupon, Etsy, and Shopify. But even on the podium of largest e-commerce platforms one finds a few lesser known names: Jingdong, a Chinese company with more than a quarter billion users, and Alibaba Group, which operates in more than 200 countries.

Transportation

A Ruby Marine barge at Ruby on the Yukon River in 2014.

Richard Murphy | Ruby Marine

No Port No Problem

Alaska’s plane and barge driven rural shipping industry

By Sam Friedman

T

he prices for fuel and food surprise many first time visitors to rural Alaska towns. In Fort Yukon, on the upper Yukon River 135 miles northeast of Fairbanks, a gallon of heating oil cost $6.35 this fall. A dozen eggs at Fort Yukon’s Alaska Commercial Company store cost $5.99.

But these prices seem less remarkable in light of all the work, fuel, and logistics it takes to transport these goods to remote Alaska towns and villages.

This time of year, the barges have finished their season traveling the Yukon River. Barge business Ruby Marine, the only major barge company on the Upper Yukon, serves Fort Yukon with three barge deliveries each summer in June, July, and August. By October, even if it’s been warm and the river is far from freezing, it’s not practical to operate large barges.

Black Fox Strategy

Designing Strategy to Manage Risk and Optimize Resilience

@Judy Patrick Photography
Erin Sedor, Owner of Black Fox Strategy

Y

ou might say Erin Sedor has a superpower: seeing what others cannot. As the owner of Black Fox Strategy, Sedor can effectively identify seemingly unrelated elements that either trigger or combine to undermine strategic business objectives. “Designing strategy to manage risk and optimize resilience requires an understanding of more than just figuring out where you want to go,” Sedor says. “You need to really understand what you are capable of doing.”

That’s where Sedor excels. As a board and CEO advisor specializing in the refinement of strategy design and execution, she helps clients properly assess interrelated issues to successfully achieve their goals. “The foundation of my practice is based on a balanced approach to strategy, risk, and resilience to ensure that organizations successfully achieve their mission while generating growth and ensuring survival through sound resilience and continuity practices,” Sedor says.

– PAID ADVERTISEMENT –

Finance

Bathroom of a home at Woodhaven Preserve subdivision, developed by Spinell Homes.

Spinell Homes

Leveraging Construction Financing

The ins and outs of finding the right loan

By Tracy Barbour

C

onstruction financing is extremely important to Spinell Homes. As Alaska’s largest home builder, the company has erected 3,200 homes through­out Southcentral Alaska since 1987. “Almost every house we build is financed through our favorite local bank, Northrim Bank, and the exceptions are built for people with either their own cash or are larger projects where the owners have their own financing,” says Andre Spinelli, vice president of design and development. “We also obtain loans for the development of subdivisions and commercial projects as well.”

Recently, Spinell Homes completed the thirteen-lot Woodhaven Preserve subdivision near O’Malley Road and Huffman Road and the 79th Street GarageTown facility at the corner of 79th and Petersburg. Both Anchorage projects were financed through Northrim by Spinell Homes or the subsidiary 79th Street GarageTown—although Woodhaven Preserve was done with minimal financing due to cash on hand at the time of development. Spinell Homes also just closed on a land purchase and development loan that was used to buy the land and build the roads of Phase 9 of The Terraces Subdivision. The company anticipated beginning construction in August.

Oil & Gas

Andeavor’s Kenai refinery produces gasoline, jet fuel, ultra-low sulfur diesel, propane, and asphalt.

Andeavor

Where Does All That Oil Go?

Looking downstream at Alaska’s oil

By Isaac Stone Simonelli

T

he Last Frontier is far more than a raw resource extraction point for North Slope crude oil, according to a manager of one of the three Alaska in-state oil refineries.

“Much of Alaska’s crude oil remains in state and is refined into commercial and residential product used across the state,” says Cameron Hunt, who is the vice president of and manages the Andeavor
Kenai Refinery. “The remaining crude oil can be shipped elsewhere, such as refineries and other sources along the West Coast of the United States and around the world.”

Alaska Native

Enterprising Entrepreneurs

Creative business in rural Alaska

By Julie Stricker

O

ne of the first things most people notice when they meet Holly Mititquq Nordlum are the distinctive tattoos on her chin. Nordlum, an Iñupiaq from Kotzebue, is a graphic designer and artist in Anchorage who is successfully melding traditional art with contemporary ideas.

Alaska Native

Enterprising Entrepreneurs

Creative business in rural Alaska

By Julie Stricker

O

ne of the first things most people notice when they meet Holly Mititquq Nordlum are the distinctive tattoos on her chin. Nordlum, an Iñupiaq from Kotzebue, is a graphic designer and artist in Anchorage who is successfully melding traditional art with contemporary ideas.

“I love Anchorage. It’s the biggest Native village in Alaska. Now, with the traditional tattooing that I do, and talking about it being part of who you are and your identity, I get to travel all over the state.”

—Holly Mititquq Nordlum, Owner, Naniq Design

Art and Tradition

Nordlum opened her graphic arts studio, Naniq Design, in 2004 and specializes in work for Alaska Native corporations and events. “It’s kind of great for me,” she says. “I love Anchorage. It’s the biggest Native village in Alaska. Now, with the traditional tattooing that I do, and talking about it being part of who you are and your identity, I get to travel all over the state.”

“It’s kind of awesome that it’s taking off so well,” Nordlum says. “We’re tattooing people every day.

TOP 49ers Special Section | Directory

2018 Top 49ers:

Teamwork, Talent, and Triumph

C

ongratulations are in order for Alaska’s 2018 MVCs—Most Valuable Corporations. Every year Alaska Business scouts for contenders to vie for top ranking in the Top 49ers, which are at least 51 percent Alaskan-owned. These companies are home-grown heroes in Alaska’s economy, providing jobs, supporting communities, and making the plays that keep Alaskans on their feet.

It’s been widely speculated in the business community that 2018 signals the end of the slow bottoming out of Alaska’s economy, and there’s optimism around the state for new projects, new contracts, and new areas of exploration in 2019. Construction is building in the Interior, many eyes are taking a long look at the newly-opened ANWR, and the state has hit several mining milestones.

Alaskans are tough, and across the Last Frontier people have shown their grit and determination to make it work. And it is working.

Captaining those efforts are the Alaska Business Top 49ers, who through practice and intense training (maybe not always in a football field) prepared themselves to thrive; over the past few years many have managed to grow or maintain profit margins despite economic troubles, found solutions to keep as many people at their desks or in the field as possible, and set aside time and money to keep Alaska’s communities in the game.

Alaska Business is thrilled to be your biggest fan.

TOP 49ers Special Section | Directory

2018 Top 49ers:

Teamwork, Talent, and Triumph

C

ongratulations are in order for Alaska’s 2018 MVCs—Most Valuable Corporations. Every year Alaska Business scouts for contenders to vie for top ranking in the Top 49ers, which are at least 51 percent Alaskan-owned. These companies are home-grown heroes in Alaska’s economy, providing jobs, supporting communities, and making the plays that keep Alaskans on their feet.

It’s been widely speculated in the business community that 2018 signals the end of the slow bottoming out of Alaska’s economy, and there’s optimism around the state for new projects, new contracts, and new areas of exploration in 2019. Construction is building in the Interior, many eyes are taking a long look at the newly-opened ANWR, and the state has hit several mining milestones.

Alaskans are tough, and across the Last Frontier people have shown their grit and determination to make it work. And it is working.

Captaining those efforts are the Alaska Business Top 49ers, who through practice and intense training (maybe not always in a football field) prepared themselves to thrive; over the past few years many have managed to grow or maintain profit margins despite economic troubles, found solutions to keep as many people at their desks or in the field as possible, and set aside time and money to keep Alaska’s communities in the game.

Alaska Business is thrilled to be your biggest fan.

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation

PO Box 129, Barrow AK 99723 | 907-852-8633
asrc.com | [email protected] | WeAreASRC |
ASRC_AK | ArcticSlopeRegionalCorporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$2,697,862,000
2016
$2,371,164,000
2015
$2,515,377,000
2014
$2,663,540,000
2013
$2,525,615,00

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017
No Change
Change in Revenue from 2016

13.8%

Services/Products: Government contract services, petroleum refining and marketing, energy support services, industrial services, construction, resource development.

Recent noteworthy events: After nearly forty years of effort by ASRC and other key supporters, including our AK Delegation and VOICE, the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was opened to responsible oil and gas development by way of a provision in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed by President Donald J. Trump.

Rex A. Rock Sr.
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 11,301
Alaska Employees 3,715
Alaskan Workforce 33%

Bristol Bay Native Corporation

111 W. 16th Ave., Suite 400, Anchorage AK 99501 | 907-278-3602
bbnc.net | [email protected] | BristolBayNativeCorporation |
@BristolBayToday | bristol-bay-native-corporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$1,659,345,000
2016
$1,525,181,000
2015
$1,512,022,000
2014
$1,736,084,000
2013
$1,835,894,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017
No Change
Change in Revenue from 2016

9.8%

Services/Products: Construction, government services, industrial services, and tourism.

Recent noteworthy events: BBNC and Dillingham-based village corporation Choggiung Ltd. announced their groundbreaking partnership, where Choggiung has acquired a majority ownership of the Bristol Alliance of Companies, a group of construction, environmental, and professional service companies formed by BBNC in 1994.

Jason Metrokin
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 3,860
Alaska Employees 1,550
Alaskan Workforce 40%

NANA Regional Corporation

PO Box 49, Kotzebue AK 99752 | 907-442-3301
nana.com | [email protected] | nanaregionalcorporation |
@NANACorporation | 2853774

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$1,354,000,000
2016
$1,300,000,000
2015
$1,600,000,000
2014
$1,600,000,000
2013
$1,700,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017
No Change
Change in Revenue from 2016

4.2%

Services/Products: NANA has operations in thirty-eight states, fifteen countries, and across five continents in our core areas of resource development/mining, federal and commercial.

Wayne Westlake
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 12,251
Alaska Employees 4,796
Alaskan Workforce 39%

Lynden

6441 S. Airpark Pl., Anchorage AK 99502 | 907-245-1544
lynden.com | [email protected] | LyndenInc |
LyndenInc | lynden-incorporated

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$950,000,000
2016
$925,000,000
2015
$975,000,000
2014
$1,000,000,000
2013
$875,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

2.7%

Services/Products: Lynden is a family of transportation companies with capabilities including truckload and less-than-truckload services, scheduled and charter barges, scheduled and charter cargo aircraft, worldwide freight forwarding, heavy haul and oversize services, intermodal bulk chemical hauls, and multi-modal logistics.

Recent noteworthy events: Winner of Logistics Management’s 2018 Quest for Quality Awards for the Western Regional LTL Carriers and Air Freight Forwarders categories. Alaska Trucking Association Driver of the Year in 2018 (Jack Sorensen), 2017 (John Schank), 2016 (Brian Ambrose), and 2014 (John Schank).

Jim Jansen
Chairman
Established 1954
Worldwide Employees 2,600
Alaska Employees 950
Alaskan Workforce 36.5%

Chugach Alaska Corporation

3800 Centerpoint Dr., Suite 1200, Anchorage AK 99503-4396 | 907-563-8866
chugach.com | [email protected] | chugachalaskacorporation |
linkedin.com/company/chugach

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$920,000,000
2016
$842,000,000
2015
$758,000,000
2014
$626,000,000
2013
$609,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

9.3%

Services/Products: Government services, facilities services, energy services, investments, land and resource development.

Recent noteworthy events: Chugach is monetizing ANCSA land assets for the benefit of our shareholders and region for generations to come, including sale of the ‘below-ground’ coal rights in the Bering River Coal Field and pursuit of a carbon offset project.

Gabriel Kompkoff
CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 6,400
Alaska Employees 1,000
Alaskan Workforce 15.6%

Chenega Corporation

3000 C St., Suite 301, Anchorage AK 99503-3975
907-277-5706
chenega.com | [email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$876,000,000
2016
$927,000,000
2015
$882,000,000
2014
$885,000,000
2013
$1,044,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

5.5%

Services/Products: Federal contracting: technical and installation services, military, intelligence and operations support, environmental, healthcare, facilities management, and information technology. Commercial Services: communications, home health, food services, contract staffing, advanced analytics, and software engineering.

Recent noteworthy events: Two golf tournaments raised $88,000 for the Wounded Warrior Program. Donations to AFN’s annual conference including $5,000 sponsorship and $47,000 for Chenega Elders to travel and stay for the week. Plus Tatitlek’s Heritage Week, Alaska Native Heritage Center, Native Village of Eyak, and $150,000 to Chugach School District.

Charles W. Totemoff
President/CEO
Established 1974
Worldwide Employees 5,600
Alaska Employees 219
Alaskan Workforce 4%

Afognak Native Corporation

300 Alimaq Dr., Kodiak AK 99615
907-486-6014
afognak.com | alutiiq.com

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$608,104,000
2016
$474,271,000
2015
$457,569,000
2014
$505,346,000
2013
$526,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

28.2%

Services/Products: Afognak Native Corporation, Alutiiq, and their subsidiaries provide an exceptional track record of services in the government and commercial sectors worldwide, including leasing; construction; timber; engineering; security; logistics, operations and maintenance; oilfield; and youth services.

Recent noteworthy events: On June 28, 2018, Afognak Native Corporation hosted the 3rd Annual Afognak Youth Charity Golf Tournament at the Anchorage Golf Course.

Greg Hambright
President/CEO
Established 1977
Worldwide Employees 5,185
Alaska Employees 158
Alaskan Workforce 3%

Calista Corporation

5015 Business Park Blvd., Suite 3000, Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-275-2800
calistacorp.com | [email protected] | calistacorporation |
calistacorp | calistacorporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$480,200,000
2016
$492,200,000
2015
$460,100,000
2014
$401,900,000
2013
$368,914,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

2.4%

Services/Products: Defense contracting; construction; heavy equipment sales, rental, service; real estate; environmental services; marine transportation; oil field services; fiber optic services.

Recent noteworthy events: Brice Environmental adds drone imagery services.

Andrew Guy
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 3,000
Alaska Employees 800
Alaskan Workforce 26%

Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation

PO Box 890, Utqiaġvik AK 99723
907-852-4460
uicalaska.com

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$470,425,629
2016
$424,300,000
2015
$424,426,000
2014
$356,781,000
2013
$320,716,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

No Change

Change in Revenue from 2016

10.9%

Services/Products: Providing services to clients in a variety of industries, including operations in Barrow, construction, architecture and engineering, regulatory consulting, information technology, marine operations, logistics, and maintenance and manufacturing.

Recent noteworthy events: The US Army Corps of Engineers awarded UIC Science the 2018 ICEX project for the US Navy—this project involved the construction of a temporary camp located 150 nautical miles north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Three nuclear submarines (two US and one British) participated in this project.

Delbert Rexford
President/CEO
Established 1973
Worldwide Employees 4,450
Alaska Employees 605
Alaskan Workforce 13.5%

Cook Inlet Region, Inc.

PO Box 93330, Anchorage AK 99509-3330 | 907-274-8638
CIRI.com | [email protected]
CIRInews | @CIRI

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$439,349,000
2016
$289,048,000
2015
$222,810,000
2014
$304,421,000
2013
$214,930,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

52%

Services/Products: CIRI’s financial strength and expertise spans diverse business segments which primarily include real estate, oilfield and construction services, land and natural resources, energy and infrastructure, environmental services, government services, and private equity.

Recent noteworthy events: Completed the acquisition of Portage, Inc., a former competitor to the North Wind Group, specializing in environmental remediation for the energy and defense sectors.

Sophie Minich
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 1,384
Alaska Employees 284
Alaskan Workforce 20.5%

Bering Straits Native Corporation

3301 C St., Suite 400, Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-563-3788
beringstraits.com | [email protected]
GoBSNC

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$357,900,000
2016
$326,000,000
2015
$304,404,000
2014
$229,482,000
2013
$242,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

9.8%

Services/Products: Logistics, aircraft and airfield services, base operations support services, special training and security, administrative services, IT services, communications, construction, environmental services, and distribution.

Recent noteworthy events: BSNC shareholders will vote on approving the proposed Beringia Settlement Trust at the 2018 Annual Meeting in October. A Trust can provide tax-free dividend distributions to shareholders in future years, increased shareholder and descendant benefits, and increased dividends.

Gail R. Schubert
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 1,447
Alaska Employees 337
Alaskan Workforce 23.2%

Sealaska

One Sealaska Plaza, Suite 400, Juneau AK 99801-1276 | 907-586-1512
sealaska.com | [email protected] | sealaskacorporation
Sealaska | sealaska-corporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$293,400,000
2016
$145,500,000
2015
$109,440,000
2014
$121,540,000
2013
$164,950,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

10

Change in Revenue from 2016

101.6%

Services/Products: Sealaska businesses drive success and utilize the wisdom of Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian ancestors. We are a group of companies working together toward healthier oceans and waterways.
Anthony Mallott
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 300
Alaska Employees 50
Alaskan Workforce 16.6%

Doyon, Limited

1 Doyon Pl., Suite 300, Fairbanks AK 99701-2941 | 888-478-4755
doyon.com | [email protected] | doyonlimited
doyonlimited | 68337

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$290,548,000
2016
$305,412,000
2015
$378,288,768
2014
$362,816,481
2013
$318,552,461

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

4.9%

Services/Products: Doyon has business lines in oil field service contracting, including oil rigs, camps and services, engineering and design, and pipeline construction; government contracting including utility management, construction and information technology; resource development; telecommunications; and laundry.

Recent noteworthy events: The 2017 Family Friendly Workplace – Large Business award from the Greater Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce; Kantishna Roadhouse received Gold LEED Certification; and Doyon Drilling drilled a penta-lateral well in the Kuparuk field on the North Slope.

Aaron Schutt
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 888
Alaska Employees 591
Alaskan Workforce 66.5%

Koniag, Inc.

194 Alimaq Dr., Kodiak AK 99615 | 907-486-2530
koniag.com
Koniag

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$270,769,000
2016
$251,588,000
2015
$267,460,000
2014
$211,493,000
2013
$202,616,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

7.6%

Services/Products: IT services, government contracting services, energy and water, tourism, natural resource development, and real estate.

Recent noteworthy events: Koniag has completed a successful leadership transition bringing on Chairman Ron Unger as Interim CEO to work with President Shauna Hegna to advance company goals such as sustained growth. As part of this strategy, Koniag acquired Glacier Services, Inc. and incorporated it into its Energy & Water operations.

Ron Unger
Interim CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 753
Alaska Employees 59
Alaskan Workforce 7.8%

Olgoonik Corporation

3201 C St., Suite 700, Anchorage AK 99503
907-562-8728
olgoonik.com

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$260,200,000
2016
$241,800,000
2015
$260,600,000
2014
$231,900,000
2013
$215,200,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

7.6%

Services/Products: Construction, logistics, oilfield support, security, and remediation.

Recent noteworthy events: Completed acquisition of FPM Group Ltd. and FPM Remediations, Inc. in 2018, growing our capacity for environmental services and building our capacity for geophysics and military munitions response programs.

Hugh Patkotak Sr.
President/CEO
Established 1973
Worldwide Employees 834
Alaska Employees 114
Alaskan Workforce 13.6%

Ahtna, Inc.

PO Box 649, Glennallen AK 99588 | 907-822-3476
ahtna-inc.com | [email protected] | Ahtna.Inc
ahtnainc | ahtna-inc.

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$238,000,000
2016
$217,700,000
2015
$188,400,000
2014
$185,000,000
2013
$200,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

No change

Change in Revenue from 2016

9.3%

Services/Products: Ahtna’s principle activities include construction, engineering, environmental, facilities management, surveying, security, military training, janitorial, healthcare and medical records management, government contracting, land management and resource development, and oil and gas pipeline services.

Recent noteworthy events: Ahtna is dedicated to its mission of providing economic, cultural, and social benefits to its shareholders. Ahtna is currently involved in a carbon offset program in our region which complements that mission.

Michelle Anderson
President
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 1,380
Alaska Employees 309
Alaskan Workforce 22%

Goldbelt, Incorporated

3025 Clinton Dr., Juneau AK 99801 | 907-790-4990
Goldbelt.com | [email protected]lt.com
Goldbelt

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$229,389,285
2016
$236,747,520
2015
$220,276,480
2014
$169,063,557
2013
$146,033,239

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

3.1%

Services/Products: Goldbelt has a strong foundation in the federal market serving many different agencies performing work across the country and overseas. The tourism market in Southeast Alaska is growing and offering more employment for shareholders in the Capital City. This is driving larger corporate investment.
Elliott Wimberly
President/CEO
Established 1974
Worldwide Employees 1,500
Alaska Employees 250
Alaskan Workforce 17%

Chugach Electric Association

5601 Electron Dr., Anchorage AK 99518 | 907-563-7494
chugachelectric.com | Chugach Electric
@chugachelectric

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$224,689,000
2016
$197,747,579
2015
$216,421,152
2014
$281,318,513
2013
$305,308,427

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

13.6%

Services/Products: Electric utility.

Recent noteworthy events: Voter approved acquisition of Municipal Light & Power.

Lee Thibert
CEO
Established 1948
Worldwide Employees 302
Alaska Employees 302
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Aleut Corporation

4000 Old Seward Hwy., Suite 300, Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-561-4300
aleutcorp.com | [email protected]
Aleut Corporation | @AleutCorp

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$211,837,206
2016
$171,655,823
2015
$137,942,098
2014
$120,307,293
2013
$116,260,627

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

23.4%

Services/Products: Federal contracting; O&M; instrumentation for oil and gas industry; mechanical contracting; radiological laboratory analysis; field testing; land remediation; commercial and residential real estate; fuel sales and storage; oil well testing services; information technology; and construction services.
Thomas Mack
President/CEO
Established 1972
Worldwide Employees 929
Alaska Employees 184
Alaskan Workforce 19.8%

Three Bears Alaska, Inc.

445 N. Pittman Rd., Suite B, Wasilla AK 99623
907-357-4311
threebearsalaska.com

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$187,029,540
2016
$173,169,699
2015
$175,279,992
2014
$161,254,283
2013
$136,632,222

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

8%

Services/Products: Retail grocery, general merchandise, sporting goods (hunting, fishing, and camping), pharmacies, package stores (beer, wine, and spirits), fuel stations, hardware, and motel.

Recent noteworthy events: Opened a new store located in Healy.

David A Weisz
President/CEO
Established 1980
Worldwide Employees 690
Alaska Employees 634
Alaskan Workforce 91.8%

First National Bank Alaska

PO Box 100720, Anchorage AK 99510-0720 | 907-777-4362
FNBAlaska.com | [email protected]
@FNBAlaska | @FNBAlaska

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$152,325,000
2016
$150,499,000
2015
$142,215,000
2014
$132,305,000
2013
$131,005,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

No change

Change in Revenue from 2016

1.2%

Services/Products: Friendly, knowledgeable Alaskans offering the convenience, service, and value of a full range of deposit, lending, investment management and trust services, and online and mobile banking. With branches in eighteen communities and assets of more than $3.6 billion, we believe in Alaska and have since 1922.

Recent noteworthy events: Alaska Business readers voted the bank the “Best of Alaska Business” in the Best Place to Work category for the third year in a row and Best Corporate Citizen for the second. Microsoft News named First National the most admired company in the state. Shareholders agreed to 10-for-1 stock split.

Betsy Lawer
Chair/CEO
Established 1922
Worldwide Employees 651
Alaska Employees 651
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Matanuska Electric Association

PO Box 2929
Palmer AK 99645
907-761-9300

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$148,701,932
2016
$137,279,126
2015
$142,549,343
2014
$116,570,742
2013
$105,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

8.3%

Services/Products: Alaska’s oldest existing and second largest electric cooperative, serving more than 51,000 members and 4,500 miles of power lines in Eagle River and the Matanuska Susitna Borough. MEA also buys and sells power with other utilities when it is economic for our members.

Recent noteworthy events: MEA has made great strides in developing systems to more cost effectively produce and distribute power. Recent modeling shows this can save millions of dollars for consumers. Due to the financial strength of the organization, the MEA board voted to return to capital credit payments by the end of 2018.

Tony Izzo
General Manager/CEO
Established 1941
Worldwide Employees 195
Alaska Employees 195
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Sitnasuak Native Corporation

PO Box 905, Nome AK 99762 | 907-387-1200
snc.org | [email protected] | Sitnasuak
SitnasuakNC | sitnasuak-native-corporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$134,138,330
2016
$130,210,466
2015
$116,912,297
2014
$88,128,089
2013
$93,147,344

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

3%

Services/Products: Tactical apparel, financial services, fuel distribution, real estate.

Recent noteworthy events: This is the third successive year of positive growth.

Roberta “Bobbi” Quintavell
President/CEO
Established 1973
Worldwide Employees 871
Alaska Employees 91
Alaskan Workforce 10%

Davis Constructors & Engineers, Inc.

6591 A St., Suite 300, Anchorage AK 99518 | 907-562-2336
davisconstructors.com | [email protected]
davis-constructors-&-engineers-inc.

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$120,084,328
2016
$65,497,161
2015
$108,023,675
2014
$136,117,019
2013
$163,639,861

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

14

Change in Revenue from 2016

83.3%

Services/Products: Davis Constructors & Engineers is able to provide pre-construction consulting services, constructability reviews, construction management services, [email protected] Services, design/build, civil and general construction, estimating services (civil and vertical), VE/LCC analysis, and CPM scheduling.

Recent noteworthy events: The Haskell Corp. Davis Constructors JV was selected by Lockheed Martin to construct the Long Range Discrimination Radar Launch Equipment Structure in Clear AFS, Alaska. This program is the backbone of the MDA’s layered defense strategy to protect the US homeland from ballistic missile attacks.

Josh Pepperd
President/CEO
Established 1976
Worldwide Employees 100
Alaska Employees 50
Alaskan Workforce 50%

Cruz Companies Alaska

7000 E. Palmer Wasilla Hwy.
Palmer AK 99645
907-746-3144

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$120,000,000
2016
$183,717,140
2015
$213,518,131
2014
$191,860,803
2013
$116,798,739

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

7

Change in Revenue from 2016

34.7%

Services/Products: Heavy civil construction and resource development.

Recent noteworthy events: We recently wrapped up forty miles of construction on the Dalton Highway and more than 6 million tons of select fill placed in the last year.

Dave Cruz
President
Established 1981
Worldwide Employees 289
Alaska Employees 200
Alaskan Workforce 69%

@Judy Patrick Photography

Back: Left to right: Blake Beemer, Bud Millard, Barbara Balogh, David Thibault, Harry McFarland, Jason Smedley

Front: Left to right: Robin Hager, Greg Martin, Lori McVay, Butch Lewis

ARCTIC OFFICE PRODUCTS

Alaska’s largest full-service office products dealer

W

ith about seventy-five years in business, Arctic Office Products has forged a long, rich history in Alaska. Yet, surprisingly, many people do not know that the Alaskan-owned and –operated business carries copiers. In fact, Arctic Office Products is Alaska’s largest private company that sells copiers, and it represents four of the country’s eight major copier manufacturers: Canon, Sharp, Toshiba, and HP.

Arctic Office Products also sells an array of other office machines to meet the needs of businesses large and small. Its product offerings range from enterprise HP printers, wide-format printers, and standard printers to digital white boards, postage equipment, binding equipment, laminators, shredders, calculators, and even high-end massage chairs. With locations in Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Kenai, Arctic Office Products serves customers statewide and services all of the products it sells. The company has an extensive parts inventory and sixteen technicians on staff to facilitate prompt repairs. “When a customer’s machine breaks, they can call for service and talk to someone who works here, not someone in India,” says Vice President Greg Martin. “We can show up—often within hours—with the part in hand and get you up and running.”

– PAID ADVERTISEMENT –

MTA

1740 S. Chugach St., Palmer AK 99645 | 907-745-3211
mtasolutions.com | MatanuskaTelephone

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$116,648,000
2016
$100,000,000
2015
$99,200,000
2014
$97,100,000
2013
$97,300,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

16.6%

Services/Products: Internet, MTA Stream, DTV, landline, business telecommunication systems, IT support, and outsourcing.

Recent noteworthy events: MTA rolled out new broadband products in 2017 that offer the lowest broadband price point in the market and deployed 150 miles of fiber optic cable, along with another 150 miles of innerduct that can handle future fiber deployments.

Michael Burke
CEO

Tanadgusix Corporation

3601 C St., Suite 1000, Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-278-2312
tanadgusix.com | [email protected]
TanadgusixCorporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$111,700,000
2016
$122,200,000
2015
$139,500,000
2014
N/A
2013
N/A

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

8.6%

Services/Products: Hotels, parking, tours, wind power, microgrids, power utilities ownership including North Slope Generating, bulk and retail fuel, range operations, global remote site O&M support, horizontal and vertical construction, environmental remediation, cable and fiber, engineering.

Recent noteworthy events: More than $100 million in contracts awarded in the last ninety days.

Ron Philemonoff
CEO
Established 1973
Worldwide Employees 639
Alaska Employees 281
Alaskan Workforce 44%

The Kuskokwim Corporation

4300 B St., Suite 405, Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-243-2944
kuskokwim.com | [email protected]
The Kuskokwim Corporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$104,276,146
2016
$88,719,545
2015
$86,423,567
2014
$73,122,018
2013
$36,578,105

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

6

Change in Revenue from 2016

17.5%

Services/Products: Investments; real estate rental; government contracts related to heavy civil construction, aviation, and IO&T services; energy-efficient lighting solutions; helicopter maintenance, repair, and overhaul services; Part 145 repair station; and environmental, restoration, and compliance services.

Recent noteworthy events: TKC is heavily focused on our shareholders and our region. We have utilized partnerships to bring job training to our villages, recently held a first of its kind Middle Kuskokwim Tribal Gathering, and developed a Natural Resource Policy that balances development with conservation and traditional use.

Maver Carey
President/CEO
Established 1977
Worldwide Employees 180
Alaska Employees 13
Alaskan Workforce 7%

Bethel Native Corporation

PO Box 719, Bethel AK 99559 | 907-543-2124
bethelservices.com
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$99,197,518
2016
$71,771,183
2015
$54,275,351
2014
$33,096,622
2013
$49,318,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

8

Change in Revenue from 2016

38.2%

Services/Products: General contracting, environmental remediation and consulting services, commercial properties investor, property management, theater operations.

Recent noteworthy events: Bethel Native Corporation, through its principal subsidiaries Bethel Solutions, Bethel Contracting, and Bethel Environmental Services, expanded business operations beyond Alaska to Hawaii, Washington, and California in 2017. The company now has offices in Bethel, Anchorage, Seattle, and Honolulu.

Anastasia Hoffman
President/CEO
Established 1973
Worldwide Employees 125
Alaska Employees 50
Alaskan Workforce 35%

Homer Electric Association

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$99,000,000
2016
$95,000,000
2015
$97,000,000
2014
$92,000,000
2013
$92,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

4.2%

Services/Products: Homer Electric Association, Inc. is a member-owned, not-for-profit, electric cooperative serving the Southern Kenai Peninsula.

Recent noteworthy events: Exploring the feasibility of a Community Solar Program as a result of our members’ growing interest for more renewable energy opportunities. Launching a new member benefit, Co-op Connections Car, offering discounts on products and services from participating local and national businesses.

Bradley Janorschke
General Manager
Established 1945
Worldwide Employees 138
Alaska Employees 138
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Construction Machinery Industrial

5400 Homer Dr., Anchorage AK 99518
907-563-3822
cmiak.com

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$98,500,000
2016
$98,000,000
2015
$105,000,000
2014
$127,000,000
2013
$134,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

0.5%

Services/Products: Sales, rentals, parts, and service for construction and mining equipment.

Recent noteworthy events: Added Kubota engines, engine parts, and generators and Extreme forklifts product lines.

Ken Gerondale
President/CEO
Established 1985
Worldwide Employees 105
Alaska Employees 105
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Anchorage Chrysler Dodge Center

2601 E. Fifth Ave.
Anchorage AK 99501
907-276-1331

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$90,546,881
2016
$79,853,962
2015
$89,313,811
2014
$97,752,543
2013
$85,550,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

4

Change in Revenue from 2016

13.4%

Services/Products: Sales and service of Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram cars and trucks.
Corey Meyers
President
Established 1963
Worldwide Employees 100
Alaska Employees 100
Alaskan Workforce 100%

PenAir

6100 Boeing Ave., Anchorage AK 99502 | 800-446-4228
penair.com
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$87,500,000
2016
$89,900,000
2015
$89,952,112
2014
$79,700,000
2013
$78,300,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

No change

Change in Revenue from 2016

2.7%

Services/Products: Scheduled passenger service.
Danny Seybert
CEO
Established 1955
Worldwide Employees 739
Alaska Employees 351
Alaskan Workforce 47%

Colville

Pouch 340012
Prudhoe Bay AK 99734
907-659-3198

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$87,479,056
2016
$96,299,358
2015
$132,986,277
2014
$125,690,815
2013
$105,600,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

3

Change in Revenue from 2016

9.2%

Services/Products: Colville’s group of oil field support and retail companies operate safely, reliably, and efficiently from Prudhoe Bay to the Kenai Peninsula. Our suite of capabilities include fuel and supply chain management, transport and tow services, waste management, aviation support, and camp services.

Recent noteworthy events: Modified Transport to increase efficiency. Added vertical integration from Brooks Supply to Colville, Inc. and from Transport to Colville, Inc.

Dave Pfeifer
President/CEO
Established 1981
Worldwide Employees 186
Alaska Employees 186
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Delta Constructors

3000 C St., Suite 202, Anchorage AK 99503
907-771-5800
deltaconstructors.net

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$81,550,000
2016
$121,228,363
2015
$179,492,000
2014
$166,419,000
2013
$42,110,089

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

8

Change in Revenue from 2016

32.7%

Services/Products: Delta is a general contracting company. We provide construction management, direct hire construction, and maintenance services in Alaska, North Dakota, and Texas. We are team minded, innovative, and results driven. Our commitment to safety, quality, costs, and schedule performance defines our mission.

Recent noteworthy events: 2017-2018 awarded the contract to install the ConocoPhillips Alaska GMT-1 and Hilcorp Alaska Moose Pad facilities. Delta now has the capability to fabricate truckable modules in Anchorage. Delta recently mobilized the HESS Petroleum Blue Butte Compressor Station project in ND.

Ed Gohr
CEO
Established 2007
Worldwide Employees 600
Alaska Employees 225
Alaskan Workforce 37.5%

Usibelli Coal Mine

100 Cushman St., Suite 210, Fairbanks AK 99701 | 907-452-2625
usibelli.com | [email protected]
facebook.com/UsibelliCoalMine | twitter.com/Usibelli

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$79,000,000
2016
$80,000,000
2015
$86,000,000
2014
$97,000,000
2013
$103,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

1.3%

Services/Products: Usibelli Coal Mine supplies the five power plants in Interior Alaska with affordable and reliable ultra-low sulfur coal.

Recent noteworthy events: Usibelli Coal Mine celebrates its 75th anniversary this year. The company hosted an open house for the public to celebrate the milestone and published a 128-page historical book documenting the company’s history. In July the mine achieved 500 days without a lost time accident.

Joseph E. Usibelli Jr.
President/CEO
Established 1943
Worldwide Employees 176
Alaska Employees 141
Alaskan Workforce 80%

Tyonek Native Corporation

1689 C St., Suite 219, Anchorage AK 99501 | 907-272-0707
tyonek.com | [email protected]
tyoneknativecorporation | tyonek-native-corp

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$78,000,000
2016
$89,000,000
2015
$101,000,000
2014
$120,000,000
2013
N/A

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

4

Change in Revenue from 2016

12.4%

Services/Products: Tyonek Native Corporation is the parent company to a variety of subsidiary businesses including defense manufacturing and engineering, aircraft maintenance, information technology services, and construction. The company owns over 200,000 acres of land, primarily on the west side of the Cook Inlet.

Recent noteworthy events: TFab Manufacturing, a subsidiary of Tyonek Manufacturing Group, Inc. and Tyonek Native Corporation, was recognized by Sikorsky as Black Hawk Supplier of the Year. The recognition comes in addition to the company achieving Sikorsky Supplier Gold status for the second year in a row.

Leo Barlow
CEO
Established 1973
Worldwide Employees 729
Alaska Employees 37
Alaskan Workforce 5%

Roger Hickel Contracting, Inc.

11001 Calaska Cir., Anchorage AK 99515 | 907-279-1400
rogerhickelcontracting.com
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$69,514,855
2016
$53,447,999
2015
$50,787,881
2014
$65,585,188
2013
$67,963,073

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

8

Change in Revenue from 2016

30.1%

Services/Products: Roger Hickel Contracting, Inc. provides design, pre-construction, and construction services on all types of civil and building projects.

Recent noteworthy events: RHC continues its commitment to improving educational facilities and public works. It recently completed a $40 million elementary school in Washington as well as being awarded multiple Anchorage School District projects as well as waste water and water treatment facilities for AWWU.

Mike Shaw
President
Established 1995
Worldwide Employees 78
Alaska Employees 58
Alaskan Workforce 74%

Credit Union 1

1941 Abbott Rd., Anchorage AK 99507 | 907-339-9485
cu1.org | [email protected]
@creditunion1 | @OneForAllAlaska | #creditunion1

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$65,811,947
2016
$64,618,093
2015
$60,879,254
2014
$58,634,026
2013
$52,618,949

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

No change

Change in Revenue from 2016

1.8%

Services/Products: Credit Union 1 offers a full suite of financial service to Alaskans, including low-cost loan options and cutting edge electronic services. Employees also fundraise for local causes each month, volunteer their time to nonprofit organizations, teach financial education, and more, all across the state.

Recent noteworthy events: In 2018, Credit Union 1 created the #CU1LUV Community Fund for Alaskans facing hardship. Nonprofits that identify a client whose food, shelter, or health is at risk can apply to this fund for aid. To promote the fund’s growth, CU1 has pledged to donate $1-$10 for each loan they finance.

James Wileman
President/CEO
Established 1952
Worldwide Employees 389
Alaska Employees 376
Alaskan Workforce 97%

Udelhoven Oilfield System Services

184 E. 53rd Ave., Anchorage AK 99518-1222 | 907-344-1577
udelhoven.com
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$65,016,912
2016
$97,181,224
2015
$148,746,045
2014
$198,377,193
2013
$166,229,644

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

10

Change in Revenue from 2016

33.1%

Services/Products: Oilfield services, electrical, mechanical and plumbing, QA and QC.

Recent noteworthy events: 2017 complete year without a loss time accident.

Jim Udelhoven
CEO
Established 1970
Worldwide Employees 332
Alaska Employees 322
Alaskan Workforce 97%

Tatonduk Outfitters Ltd./DBA Everts Air Cargo

PO Box 61680, Fairbanks AK 99706 | 907-450-2300
EvertsAir.com
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$63,800,000
2016
$54,135,000
2015
$57,140,000
2014
$53,150,000
2013
$51,950,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

4

Change in Revenue from 2016

17.9%

Services/Products: Everts Air Cargo provides scheduled and charter (domestic & international) air freight services using MD-80, DC-9, DC-6 and C-46 aircraft. Everts Air Alaska provides passenger, freight, and charter service out of Fairbanks using Pilatus and Caravan aircraft.
Robert Everts
CEO/Owner
Established 1978
Worldwide Employees 353
Alaska Employees 330
Alaskan Workforce 93%

Cape Fox Corporation

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$60,632,693
2016
$63,532,532
2015
$65,471,442
2014
N/A
2013
N/A

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

4.6%

Services/Products: Federal government contractor with core capabilities in medical services, professional staffing, information technology, human resources, training support, communications and media, and administrative support. In addition, the commercial division focuses on hospitality, tourism, and retail services.

Recent noteworthy events: The Federal Contracting Group added two new 8(a) subsidiaries and was awarded $72 million in new contracts in 2017. Our employees and services spanned forty-one states and countries, with Alaska having the highest number of Cape Fox employees per state.

Chris Luchtefeld
CEO
Established 1973
Worldwide Employees 748
Alaska Employees 172
Alaskan Workforce 23%

Seekins Ford Lincoln

1625 Seekins Ford Dr., Fairbanks AK 99701 | 907-459-4000
seekins.com | [email protected]
@SeekinsFordLinc

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$58,946,067
2016
$52,554,917
2015
$69,690,934
2014
$68,469,689
2013
$67,581,913

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

4

Change in Revenue from 2016

12.2%

Services/Products: New/used auto sales, service, parts, and body shop.

Recent noteworthy events: Opening of off-site Seekins Quick Lane, a maintenance and light repair facility, at Eielson AFB.

Ralph Seekins
President
Established 1977
Worldwide Employees 100
Alaska Employees 100
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Denali Federal Credit Union

440 E. 36th Ave., Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-257-7200
denalifcu.org | [email protected]
Denalifcu | denali-federal-credit-union

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$55,828,077
2016
$57,973,581
2015
$52,984,258
2014
$49,011,797
2013
$44,900,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

3.7%

Services/Products: Complete financial services to members—loans, deposits, mortgage, and investments. Online and remote services allow secure account access to Denali worldwide.

Recent noteworthy events: Denali’s Business services department serves members with complete financial services suite: business deposits and loans, online banking, merchant services, and more.

Robert Teachworth
President/CEO
Established 1948
Worldwide Employees 311
Alaska Employees 304
Alaskan Workforce 98%

Airport Equipment Rentals

1285 Van Horn Rd., Fairbanks AK 99707 | 907-456-2000
airportequipmentrentals.com
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$55,100,000
2016
$54,361,000
2015
$75,624,000
2014
$63,212,586
2013
$55,000,001

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

1

Change in Revenue from 2016

1.4%

Services/Products: Largest construction/industrial heavy equipment dealer/rental company in Alaska. Providing rentals, sales and service for the construction and oil and gas industries.

Recent noteworthy events: Paid off CAT train used for seismic exploration on the North Slope.

Jerry Sadler
Owner/President
Established 1986
Worldwide Employees 100
Alaska Employees 100
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Vitus Energy

113 W. Northern Lights Blvd., Suite 200, Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-278-6700
vitus-energy.com
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$54,500,000
2016
$55,000,000
2015
$63,000,000
2014
$69,000,000
2013
$89,600,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

3

Change in Revenue from 2016

0.9%

Services/Products: Fuel and freight services.

Recent noteworthy events: Added two tugs and one barge to the fleet.

Justin Charon
CEO
Established 2009
Worldwide Employees 70
Alaska Employees 70
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Inc.

4831 Eagle St., Anchorage AK 99503 | 907-561-1818
avec.org
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$46,500,000
2016
$49,500,000
2015
$58,600,000
2014
N/A
2013
$42,206,045

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

2

Change in Revenue from 2016

6.1%

Services/Products: Electric service.

Recent noteworthy events: Installed two additional wind projects in 2018, serving five communities.

Meera Kohler
President/CEO
Established 1967
Worldwide Employees 140
Alaska Employees 140
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Watterson Construction Co.

6500 Interstate Cir., Anchorage AK 99518
907-563-7441
[email protected]

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$41,000,000
2016
$52,000,000
2015
$104,000,000
2014
$88,000,000
2013
$90,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

No change

Change in Revenue from 2016

21.2%

Services/Products: Commercial general contractor, building commercial, civic, education, retail, office, government, military, and light industrial projects. Specializing in alternate delivery systems: design/build; construction manager/general contractor (CM/GC); and construction manager at risk ([email protected]).

Recent noteworthy events: Watterson & Callahan Construction have established a Mentor Protégé arrangement. Major Awards: Mech. Elec. Building #4 Ft. Greely and several projects for the Eielson AFB F-35A Bed Down. Recently completed Kendall Anchorage Audi Volkswagen Porsche dealership and ANTHC Childcare & Education Center.

Bill Watterson
President
Established 1981
Worldwide Employees 95
Alaska Employees 95
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Cornerstone General Contractors, Inc.

4040 B St., Suite 200
Anchorage AK 99503
907-561-1993

Scorecard

5 Year Revenue Review

2017
$40,439,104
2016
$29,041,000
2015
$38,481,000
2014
$54,400,000
2013
$89,000,000

49ers Seasonal Movement

Change in Rank from 2017

N/A

Change in Revenue from 2016

39.2%

Services/Products: Cornerstone specializes in collaborative project delivery methods for new commercial construction and the precision renovation of existing facilities. We offer a comprehensive selection of general contracting and construction management services for projects across the state.

Recent noteworthy events: Cornerstone has recently completed several high profile projects including the new Mt. Edgecumbe High School Aquatic Center in Sitka. Recent awards include the 2017 AK Governor’s Safety Award, 2017 AGC Excellence in Construction Award, and 2017 AGC Excellence in Safety Award.

Joe Jolley
President
Established 1993
Worldwide Employees 25
Alaska Employees 25
Alaskan Workforce 100%

Top 49ers Special Section | On the Field

Top 49ers Special Section | On the Field

TOP 49ers Special Section | Historical Review

Company Rank
2018
2017
Revenue
Rank
2017
2016
Revenue
Rank
2016
2015
Revenue
Rank
2015
2014
Revenue
Rank
2014
2013
Revenue
Afognak Native Corporation 7 $608,104,000 8 $474,271,000 8 $457,569,000 7 $505,346,000 7 $526,000,000
Ahtna, Inc. 16 $238,000,000 16 $217,700,000 18 $188,400,000 18 $185,000,000 18 $200,000,000
Airport Equipment Rentals 45 $55,100,000 44 $54,361,000 39 $75,624,000 44 $63,212,586 47 $55,000,001
Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Inc. 47 $46,500,000 49 $49,500,000 - - - - - -
Aleut Corporation 19 $211,837,206 20 $171,655,823 28 $137,942,098 28 $120,307,293 29 $116,260,627
Anchorage Chrysler Dodge Center 32 $90,546,881 36 $79,853,962 30 89,313,811 30 $97,752,543 39 $85,550,000
Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 1 $2,697,862,000 1 $2,371,164,000 1 $2,515,377,000 1 $2,663,540,000 1 $2,525,615,000
Bering Straits Native Corporation 11 $357,900,000 10 $326,000,000 11 $304,404,000 12 $229,482,000 14 $242,000,000
Bethel Native Corporation 29 $99,197,518 37 $71,771,183 45 $54,275,351 - - - -
Bristol Bay Native Corporation 2 $1,659,345,000 2 $1,525,181,000 3 $1,512,022,000 2 $1,736,084,000 2 $1,835,894,000
Calista Corporation 8 $480,200,000 7 $492,200,000 7 $460,100,000 8 $401,900,000 8 $368,914,000
Cape Fox Corporation 42 $60,632,693 41 $63,532,532 - - - - - -
Chenega Corporation 6 $876,000,000 4 $927,000,000 5 $882,000,000 5 $885,000,000 4 $1,044,000,000
Chugach Alaska Corporation 5 $920,000,000 6 $842,000,000 6 $758,000,000 6 $626,000,000 6 $609,000,000
Chugach Electric Association 18 $224,689,000 17 $197,747,579 16 $216,421,152 13 $281,318,513 12 $305,308,427
Colville 34 $87,479,056 31 $96,299,358 25 $132,986,277 26 $125,690,815 30 $105,600,000
Construction Machinery Industrial 31 $98,500,000 29 $98,000,000 30 $105,000,000 25 $127,000,000 25 $134,000,000
Cook Inlet Region, Inc. 10 $439,349,000 12 $289,048,000 14 $222,810,000 11 $304,421,000 16 $214,930,000
Cornerstone General Contractors, Inc. 49 $40,439,104 - - 48 $38,481,000 47 $54,400,000 38 $89,000,000
Credit Union 1 39 $65,811,947 39 $64,618,093 42 $60,879,254 46 $58,634,026 38 $52,618,949
Cruz Companies Alaska 25 $120,000,000 18 $183,717,140 17 $213,518,131 17 $191,860,803 28 $116,798,739
Davis Constructors & Engineers, Inc. 24 $120,084,328 38 $65,497,161 28 $108,023,675 22 $136,117,019 21 $163,639,861
Delta Constructors 35 $81,550,000 27 $121,228,363 19 $179,492,000 - - - -
Denali Federal Credit Union 44 $55,828,077 42 $57,973,581 46 $52,984,258 49 $49,011,797 - -
Doyon, Limited 13 $290,548,000 11 $305,412,000 10 $378,288,768 9 $362,816,481 11 $318,552,461
First National Bank Alaska 21 $152,325,000 21 $150,499,000 23 $142,215,000 23 $132,305,000 26 $131,005,000
Goldbelt, Incorporated 17 $229,389,285 15 $236,747,520 15 $220,276,480 19 $169,063,557 23 $146,033,239
Homer Electric Association 30 $99,000,000 32 $95,000,000 34 $97,000,000 34 $92,000,000 35 $92,000,000
Koniag, Inc. 14 $270,769,000 13 $251,588,000 12 $267,460,000 15 $211,493,000 17 $202,616,000
Lynden 4 $950,000,000 5 $925,000,000 4 $975,000,000 4 $1,000,000,000 5 $875,000,000
Matanuska Electric Association 22 $148,701,932 23 $137,279,126 22 $142,549,343 29 $116,570,742 31 $105,000,000
MTA 26 $116,648,000 28 $100,000,000 33 $99,200,000 31 $97,100,000 33 $97,300,000
NANA Regional Corporation 3 $1,354,000,000 3 $1,300,000,000 2 $1,600,000,000 3 $1,600,000,000 3 $1,700,000,000
Olgoonik Corporation 15 $260,200,000 14 $241,800,000 13 $260,600,000 14 $231,900,000 15 $215,200,000
PenAir 33 $87,500,000 33 $89,900,000 35 $89,952,112 38 $79,700,000 40 $78,300,000
Roger Hickel Contracting, Inc. 38 $69,514,855 46 $53,447,999 47 $50,787,881 42 $65,585,188 42 $67,963,073
Sealaska 12 $293,400,000 22 $145,500,000 27 $109,440,000 27 $121,540,000 20 $164,950,000
Seekins Ford Lincoln 43 $58,946,067 47 $52,554,917 40 $69,690,934 41 $68,469,689 43 43
Sitnasuak Native Corporation 23 $134,138,330 24 $130,210,466 26 $116,912,297 35 $88,128,089 34 $93,147,344
Tanadgusix Corp. (TDX) 27 $111,700,000 26 $122,200,000 - - - - -
Tatonduk Outfitters Ltd. 41 $63,800,000 45 $54,135,000 44 $57,140,000 48 $53,150,000 49 $51,950,000
The Kuskokwim Corporation 28 $104,276,146 34 $88,719,545 37 $86,423,567 39 $73,122,018 - $36,578,105
Three Bears Alaska, Inc. 20 $187,029,540 19 $173,169,699 20 $175,279,992 21 $161,254,283 24 $136,632,222
Tyonek Native Corporation 37 $78,000,000 - - 32 $101,000,000 - - - -
Udelhoven Oilfield System Services 40 $65,016,912 30 $97,181,224 21 $148,746,045 16 $198,377,193 19 $166,229,644
Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation (UIC) 9 $470,425,629 9 $424,300,000 9 $424,426,000 10 $356,781,000 10 $320,716,000
Usibelli Coal Mine 36 $79,000,000 35 $80,000,000 38 $86,000,000 32 $97,000,000 32 $103,000,000
Vitus Energy 46 $54,500,000 43 $55,000,000 41 $63,000,000 40 $69,000,000 37 $89,600,000
Watterson Construction Co. 48 $41,000,000 48 $52,000,000 31 $104,000,000 36 $88,000,000 36 $90,000,000
Totals $649,104,000 $526,271,000 $561,569,000 $593,346,000 $616,000,000

Company: Afognak Native Corporation
Rank 2018: 7
2017 Revenue: $608,104,000
Rank 2017: 8
2016 Revenue: $474,271,000
Rank 2016: 8
2015 Revenue: $457,569,000
Rank 2015: 7
2014 Revenue: $505,346,000
Rank 2014: 7
2013 Revenue: $526,000,000

Company: Ahtna, Inc.
Rank 2018: 16
2017 Revenue: $238,000,000
Rank 2017: 16
2016 Revenue: $217,700,000
Rank 2016: 18
2015 Revenue: $188,400,000
Rank 2015: 18
2014 Revenue: $185,000,000
Rank 2014: 18
2013 Revenue: $200,000,000

Company: Airport Equipment Rentals
Rank 2018: 45
2017 Revenue: $55,100,000
Rank 2017: 44
2016 Revenue: $54,361,000
Rank 2016: 39
2015 Revenue: $75,624,000
Rank 2015: 44
2014 Revenue: $63,212,586
Rank 2014: 47
2013 Revenue: $55,000,001

Company: Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Rank 2018: 47
2017 Revenue: $46,500,000
Rank 2017: 49
2016 Revenue: $49,500,000
Rank 2016:
2015 Revenue:
Rank 2015:
2014 Revenue:
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue:

Company: Aleut Corporation
Rank 2018: 19
2017 Revenue: $211,837,206
Rank 2017: 20
2016 Revenue: $171,655,823
Rank 2016: 28
2015 Revenue: $137,942,098
Rank 2015: 28
2014 Revenue: $120,307,293
Rank 2014: 29
2013 Revenue: $116,260,627

Company: Anchorage Chrysler Dodge Center
Rank 2018: 32
2017 Revenue: $90,546,881
Rank 2017: 36
2016 Revenue: $79,853,962
Rank 2016: 30
2015 Revenue: $89,313,811
Rank 2015: 30
2014 Revenue: $97,752,543
Rank 2014: 39
2013 Revenue: $85,550,000

Company: Arctic Slope Regional Corporation
Rank 2018: 1
2017 Revenue: $2,697,862,000
Rank 2017: 1
2016 Revenue: $2,371,164,000
Rank 2016: 1
2015 Revenue: $2,515,377,000
Rank 2015: 1
2014 Revenue: $2,663,540,000
Rank 2014: 1
2013 Revenue: $2,525,615,000

Company: Bering Straits Native Corporation
Rank 2018: 11
2017 Revenue: $357,900,000
Rank 2017: 10
2016 Revenue: $326,000,000
Rank 2016: 11
2015 Revenue: $304,404,000
Rank 2015: 12
2014 Revenue: $229,482,000
Rank 2014: 14
2013 Revenue: $242,000,000

Company: Bethel Native Corporation
Rank 2018: 29
2017 Revenue: $99,197,518
Rank 2017: 37
2016 Revenue: $71,771,183
Rank 2016: 45
2015 Revenue: $54,275,351
Rank 2015:
2014 Revenue:
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue:

Company: Bristol Bay Native Corporation
Rank 2018: 2
2017 Revenue: $1,659,345,000
Rank 2017: 2
2016 Revenue: $1,525,181,000
Rank 2016: 3
2015 Revenue: $1,512,022,000
Rank 2015: 2
2014 Revenue: $1,736,084,000
Rank 2014: 2
2013 Revenue: $1,835,894,000

Company: Calista Corporation
Rank 2018: 8
2017 Revenue: $480,200,000
Rank 2017: 7
2016 Revenue: $492,200,000
Rank 2016: 7
2015 Revenue: $460,100,000
Rank 2015: 8
2014 Revenue: $401,900,000
Rank 2014: 8
2013 Revenue: $368,914,000

Company: Cape Fox Corporation
Rank 2018: 42
2017 Revenue: $60,632,693
Rank 2017: 41
2016 Revenue: $63,532,532
Rank 2016:
2015 Revenue:
Rank 2015:
2014 Revenue:
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue:

Company: Chenega Corporation
Rank 2018: 6
2017 Revenue: $876,000,000
Rank 2017: 4
2016 Revenue: $927,000,000
Rank 2016: 5
2015 Revenue: $882,000,000
Rank 2015: 5
2014 Revenue: $885,000,000
Rank 2014: 4
2013 Revenue: $1,044,000,000

Company: Chugach Alaska Corporation
Rank 2018: 5
2017 Revenue: $920,000,000
Rank 2017: 6
2016 Revenue: $842,000,000
Rank 2016: 6
2015 Revenue: $758,000,000
Rank 2015: 6
2014 Revenue: $626,000,000
Rank 2014: 6
2013 Revenue: $609,000,000

Company: Chugach Electric Association
Rank 2018: 18
2017 Revenue: $224,689,000
Rank 2017: 17
2016 Revenue: $197,747,579
Rank 2016: 16
2015 Revenue: $216,421,152
Rank 2015: 13
2014 Revenue: $281,318,513
Rank 2014: 12
2013 Revenue: $305,308,427

Company: Colville
Rank 2018: 34
2017 Revenue: $87,479,056
Rank 2017: 31
2016 Revenue: $96,299,358
Rank 2016: 25
2015 Revenue: $132,986,277
Rank 2015: 26
2014 Revenue: $125,690,815
Rank 2014: 30
2013 Revenue: $105,600,000

Company: Construction Machinery Industrial
Rank 2018: 31
2017 Revenue: $98,500,000
Rank 2017: 29
2016 Revenue: $98,000,000
Rank 2016: 30
2015 Revenue: $105,000,000
Rank 2015: 25
2014 Revenue: $127,000,000
Rank 2014: 25
2013 Revenue: $134,000,000

Company: Cook Inlet Region, Inc.
Rank 2018: 10
2017 Revenue: $439,349,000
Rank 2017: 12
2016 Revenue: $289,048,000
Rank 2016: 14
2015 Revenue: $222,810,000
Rank 2015: 11
2014 Revenue: $304,421,000
Rank 2014: 16
2013 Revenue: $214,930,000

Company: Cornerstone General Contractors, Inc.
Rank 2018: 49
2017 Revenue: $40,439,104
Rank 2017:
2016 Revenue:
Rank 2016: 48
2015 Revenue: $38,481,000
Rank 2015: 47
2014 Revenue: $54,400,000
Rank 2014: 38
2013 Revenue: $89,000,000

Company: Credit Union 1
Rank 2018: 39
2017 Revenue: $65,811,947
Rank 2017: 39
2016 Revenue: $64,618,093
Rank 2016: 42
2015 Revenue: $60,879,254
Rank 2015: 46
2014 Revenue: $58,634,026
Rank 2014: 38
2013 Revenue: $52,618,949

Company: Cruz Companies Alaska
Rank 2018: 25
2017 Revenue: $120,000,000
Rank 2017: 18
2016 Revenue: $183,717,140
Rank 2016: 17
2015 Revenue: $213,518,131
Rank 2015: 17
2014 Revenue: $191,860,803
Rank 2014: 28
2013 Revenue: $116,798,739

Company: Davis Constructors & Engineers, Inc.
Rank 2018: 24
2017 Revenue: $120,084,328
Rank 2017: 38
2016 Revenue: $65,497,161
Rank 2016: 28
2015 Revenue: $108,023,675
Rank 2015: 22
2014 Revenue: $136,117,019
Rank 2014: 21
2013 Revenue: $163,639,861

Company: Delta Constructors
Rank 2018: 35
2017 Revenue: $81,550,000
Rank 2017: 27
2016 Revenue: $121,228,363
Rank 2016: 19
2015 Revenue: $179,492,000
Rank 2015:
2014 Revenue:
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue:

Company: Denali Federal Credit Union
Rank 2018: 44
2017 Revenue: $55,828,077
Rank 2017: 42
2016 Revenue: $57,973,581
Rank 2016: 46
2015 Revenue: $52,984,258
Rank 2015: 49
2014 Revenue: $49,011,797
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue:

Company: Doyon, Limited
Rank 2018: 13
2017 Revenue: $290,548,000
Rank 2017: 11
2016 Revenue: $305,412,000
Rank 2016: 10
2015 Revenue: $378,288,768
Rank 2015: 9
2014 Revenue: $362,816,481
Rank 2014: 11
2013 Revenue: $318,552,461

Company: First National Bank Alaska
Rank 2018: 21
2017 Revenue: $152,325,000
Rank 2017: 21
2016 Revenue: $150,499,000
Rank 2016: 23
2015 Revenue: $142,215,000
Rank 2015: 23
2014 Revenue: $132,305,000
Rank 2014: 26
2013 Revenue: $131,005,000

Company: Goldbelt, Incorporated
Rank 2018: 17
2017 Revenue: $229,389,285
Rank 2017: 15
2016 Revenue: $236,747,520
Rank 2016: 15
2015 Revenue: $220,276,480
Rank 2015: 19
2014 Revenue: $169,063,557
Rank 2014: 23
2013 Revenue: $146,033,239

Company: Homer Electric Association
Rank 2018: 30
2017 Revenue: $99,000,000
Rank 2017: 32
2016 Revenue: $95,000,000
Rank 2016: 34
2015 Revenue: $97,000,000
Rank 2015: 34
2014 Revenue: $92,000,000
Rank 2014: 35
2013 Revenue: $92,000,000

Company: Koniag, Inc.
Rank 2018: 14
2017 Revenue: $270,769,000
Rank 2017: 13
2016 Revenue: $251,588,000
Rank 2016: 12
2015 Revenue: $267,460,000
Rank 2015: 15
2014 Revenue: $211,493,000
Rank 2014: 16
2013 Revenue: $202,616,000

Company: Lynden
Rank 2018: 4
2017 Revenue: $950,000,000
Rank 2017: 5
2016 Revenue: $925,000,000
Rank 2016: 4
2015 Revenue: $975,000,000
Rank 2015: 4
2014 Revenue: $1,000,000,000
Rank 2014: 5
2013 Revenue: $875,000,000

Company: Matanuska Electric Association
Rank 2018: 22
2017 Revenue: $148,701,932
Rank 2017: 23
2016 Revenue: $137,279,126
Rank 2016: 22
2015 Revenue: $142,549,343
Rank 2015: 29
2014 Revenue: $116,570,742
Rank 2014: 31
2013 Revenue: $105,000,000

Company: MTA
Rank 2018: 26
2017 Revenue: $116,648,000
Rank 2017: 28
2016 Revenue: $100,000,000
Rank 2016: 33
2015 Revenue: $99,200,000
Rank 2015: 31
2014 Revenue: $97,100,000
Rank 2014: 33
2013 Revenue: $97,300,000

Company: NANA Regional Corporation
Rank 2018: 3
2017 Revenue: $1,354,000,000
Rank 2017: 3
2016 Revenue: $1,300,000,000
Rank 2016: 2
2015 Revenue: $1,600,000,000
Rank 2015: 3
2014 Revenue: $1,600,000,000
Rank 2014: 3
2013 Revenue: $1,700,000,000

Company: Olgoonik Corporation
Rank 2018: 15
2017 Revenue: $260,200,000
Rank 2017: 14
2016 Revenue: $241,800,000
Rank 2016: 13
2015 Revenue: $260,600,000
Rank 2015: 14
2014 Revenue: $231,900,000
Rank 2014: 15
2013 Revenue: $215,200,000

Company: PenAir
Rank 2018: 33
2017 Revenue: $87,500,000
Rank 2017: 33
2016 Revenue: $89,900,000
Rank 2016: 35
2015 Revenue: $89,952,112
Rank 2015: 38
2014 Revenue: $79,700,000
Rank 2014: 40
2013 Revenue: $78,300,000

Company: Roger Hickel Contracting, Inc.
Rank 2018: 38
2017 Revenue: $69,514,855
Rank 2017: 46
2016 Revenue: $53,447,999
Rank 2016: 47
2015 Revenue: $50,787,881
Rank 2015: 42
2014 Revenue: $65,585,188
Rank 2014: 42
2013 Revenue: $67,963,073

Company: Sealaska
Rank 2018: 12
2017 Revenue: $293,400,000
Rank 2017: 22
2016 Revenue: $145,500,000
Rank 2016: 27
2015 Revenue: $109,440,000
Rank 2015: 27
2014 Revenue: $121,540,000
Rank 2014: 20
2013 Revenue: $164,950,000

Company: Seekins Ford Lincoln
Rank 2018: 43
2017 Revenue: $58,946,067
Rank 2017: 47
2016 Revenue: $52,554,917
Rank 2016: 40
2015 Revenue: $69,690,934
Rank 2015: 41
2014 Revenue: $68,469,689
Rank 2014: 43
2013 Revenue: $67,581,913

Company: Sitnasuak Native Corporation
Rank 2018: 23
2017 Revenue: $134,138,330
Rank 2017: 24
2016 Revenue: $130,210,466
Rank 2016: 26
2015 Revenue: $116,912,297
Rank 2015: 35
2014 Revenue: $88,128,089
Rank 2014: 34
2013 Revenue: $93,147,344

Company: Tatonduk Outfitters Ltd.
Rank 2018: 41
2017 Revenue: $63,800,000
Rank 2017: 45
2016 Revenue: $54,135,000
Rank 2016: 44
2015 Revenue: $57,140,000
Rank 2015: 48
2014 Revenue: $53,150,000
Rank 2014: 49
2013 Revenue: $51,950,000

Company: Tanadgusix Corp. (TDX)
Rank 2018: 27
2017 Revenue: $111,700,000
Rank 2017: 26
2016 Revenue: $122,200,000
Rank 2016:
2015 Revenue:
Rank 2015:
2014 Revenue:
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue:

Company: The Kuskokwim Corporation
Rank 2018: 28
2017 Revenue: $104,276,146
Rank 2017: 34
2016 Revenue: $88,719,545
Rank 2016: 37
2015 Revenue: $86,423,567
Rank 2015: 39
2014 Revenue: $73,122,018
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue: $36,578,105

Company: Three Bears Alaska, Inc.
Rank 2018: 20
2017 Revenue: $187,029,540
Rank 2017: 19
2016 Revenue: $173,169,699
Rank 2016: 20
2015 Revenue: $175,279,992
Rank 2015: 21
2014 Revenue: $161,254,283
Rank 2014: 24
2013 Revenue: $136,632,222

Company: Tyonek Native Corporation
Rank 2018: 37
2017 Revenue: $78,000,000
Rank 2017:
2016 Revenue:
Rank 2016: 32
2015 Revenue: $101,000,000
Rank 2015:
2014 Revenue:
Rank 2014:
2013 Revenue:

Company: Udelhoven Oilfield System Services
Rank 2018: 40
2017 Revenue: $65,016,912
Rank 2017: 30
2016 Revenue: $97,181,224
Rank 2016: 21
2015 Revenue: $148,746,045
Rank 2015: 16
2014 Revenue: $198,377,193
Rank 2014: 19
2013 Revenue: $166,229,644

Company: Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation (UIC)
Rank 2018: 9
2017 Revenue: $470,425,629
Rank 2017: 9
2016 Revenue: $424,300,000
Rank 2016: 9
2015 Revenue: $424,426,000
Rank 2015: 10
2014 Revenue: $356,781,000
Rank 2014: 10
2013 Revenue: $320,716,000

Company: Usibelli Coal Mine
Rank 2018: 36
2017 Revenue: $79,000,000
Rank 2017: 35
2016 Revenue: $80,000,000
Rank 2016: 38
2015 Revenue: $86,000,000
Rank 2015: 32
2014 Revenue: $97,000,000
Rank 2014: 32
2013 Revenue: $103,000,000

Company: Vitus Energy
Rank 2018: 46
2017 Revenue: $54,500,000
Rank 2017: 43
2016 Revenue: $55,000,000
Rank 2016: 41
2015 Revenue: $63,000,000
Rank 2015: 40
2014 Revenue: $69,000,000
Rank 2014: 37
2013 Revenue: $89,600,000

Company: Watterson Construction Co.
Rank 2018: 48
2017 Revenue: $41,000,000
Rank 2017: 48
2016 Revenue: $52,000,000
Rank 2016: 31
2015 Revenue: $104,000,000
Rank 2015: 36
2014 Revenue: $88,000,000
Rank 2014: 36
2013 Revenue: $90,000,000

Totals
2017 Revenue: $649,104,000
2016 Revenue: $526,271,000
2015 Revenue: $561,569,000
2014 Revenue: $593,346,000
2013 Revenue: $616,000,000

TOP 49ers Special Section | Q&A

How the Top 49ers Communicate and Collaborate

T

he Top 49ers are ranked on gross revenue; while earning money is one obvious indication of success, it certainly isn’t the only one. And in meeting with and learning from our Top 49ers over the years, we know that they all measure success broadly to include happy employees, satisfied clients, and healthy communities. It’s not just about the money, though that is a vital component of operating any company and for the health of the economy as a whole. Put all the parts together and ultimately it’s about becoming a team.

And every successful team shares one trait: great teamwork. The Alaska Business Top 49ers have some of the best teams around, so for 2018 we asked them, “What initiatives or policies have been most effective at your business to improve communication and teamwork?”

This year’s Top 49ers share their secrets to successful synergy in the workplace.

TOP 49ers Special Section | AVEC

Alaska Village Electric Cooperative

The nation’s largest electric utility retail cooperative

By Arie Henry

AVEC’s automated power plant, bulk fuel tank farm, and four wind turbines in Chevak.

AVEC

W

While the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC) provides power to just more than 4 percent of Alaska’s population, its service map stretches over a remarkably large portion of the state—from as far northeast as Kivalina to as far southeast as Yakutat. So how does a small electric co-op, employing less than 160 full-time and part-time employees throughout the state, manage to thrive as the largest of its type in the nation? Part of the explanation can be found in the cooperative spirit that characterizes rural Alaska.

AVEC was first incorporated in 1967 and officially began operations in 1968. The first three member villages were Hooper Bay, Nulato, and Old Harbor.

Today, as AVEC celebrates its 50th anniversary, that membership has bloomed into fifty-eight villages consisting of a combined population of more than 33,000. As geographically, economically, and culturally diverse as this base is, the common thread tying them together is a close-knit sense of community.

TOP 49ers Special Section | Anchorage Chrysler

Anchorage Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

Miles ahead of the pack

By Arie Henry

A

laska is a rugged place. Its landscape is rugged, its people are rugged, and it takes rugged tools to get the job—whatever job that may be—done. It comes as no surprise, then, that the state’s roads are dominated by large pickups, four-wheel drive SUVs, and hill-traversing Jeeps. Alaska terrain calls for vehicles built with power and maneuverability.

Enter Anchorage Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram, which prides itself as “Ram Truck Territory and Alaska’s Jeep Headquarters.” As recently as 2014, the State of Alaska Department of Motor Vehicles records contained more registrations of Chrysler, Dodge, and Ram vehicles than any other automobile brand (compared to ownership of brands such as Ford, Chevrolet, or Toyota). According to Anchorage Chrysler President and General Manager Corey Meyers, there are very few states in a similar situation, perhaps only one other.

TOP 49ers Special Section | KONIAG

Koniag

Values first and poised for growth

By Tasha Anderson

Koniag shareholders in traditional regalia.

© Josh Corbett | Koniag

T

his marks the fifth consecutive year of profitability for Koniag, a record of success that Senior Director of Shareholder Services Stacey Simmons attributes to the effort of Koniag’s Board of Directors and leadership team to work together to make informed decisions, weighing industry data and research with the input and opinions from the regional corporation’s shareholders.

“Koniag does a phenomenal job communicating with our shareholders, but we are always looking to do more,” Simmons says, an endeavor that she facilities through her role on a daily basis.

TOP 49ers Special Section | CMI

Construction Machinery Industrial

Equipping Alaska’s industries

By Tasha Anderson

“O

ur number one priority is product support to the equipment that we sell and rent,” says Construction Machinery Industrial (CMI) President and CEO Ken Gerondale.

“Product support includes providing parts; it also includes the service, whether it’s the service for warranty or longer-­term maintenance; and then product support can also include having a large enough inventory of equipment in the state of Alaska to provide rental equipment or standby equipment in case a piece of equipment goes down.”

Ultimately CMI strives to be available with the right tools, the right people, and the right parts, anytime and anywhere in the state. On the company’s website there are phone numbers and email addresses listed for employees at each of CMI’s four branches, along with this simple reassurance: “Branch numbers answered 24/7.”

Professional Services

Corporate teams play one of Venture Up’s most popular games—DB Cooper: Who am I?

Venture Up

Playing the Game

The benefits of corporate team building

By Vanessa Orr

G

etting people to work together as a team can be a challenge, especially if those people have different learning styles or don’t process information the same way. Trying to find a way to teach employees how to respect each other’s differences while maximizing each team member’s individual strengths isn’t a game—but maybe it should be.

What many business owners have learned—and what team-building companies promote—is that learning should be fun. “When employees feel that something is an obligation, like a lecture or listening to a keynote speaker, they tend to zone out,” says Todd Rice, director of THEY improv. “But when something is more interactive, they open themselves up to it; they have fun, they are engaged, and their brains are working at peak efficiency.

ENVIRONMENTAL

Ariel view of the junkyard site at Wrangell taken August 19 that shows two-thirds of the stockpile of treated soil has been removed; the removed soil was transported to an Oregon landfill.

Shane O’Neill | NRC Alaska

The Best Soil Remediation Tools Available

Prevention, awareness, and innovation

By Judy Mottl

O

f about 7,600 contaminated sites in Alaska, some 70 percent have been cleaned up with 2,300 remaining that require additional remediation.

The bulk of those sites, about 73 percent, are contaminated by petroleum, the most common toxic matter in land-based spills statewide, according to Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) officials and remediation specialists.

“We are in a much better place [with regard to land-based spills] than we were back in March 1989,” says Graham Wood, program manager of the DEC’s Prevention Preparedness and Response Program, which was launched following the Valdez oil spill in 1989.

Education

The University of Alaska Anchorage’s College of Business and Public Policy is located inside Rasmuson Hall.

Eric Terry

Planning for the Future

What gets workers farther: traditional degrees or the school of life?

By Samantha Davenport

T

here is an array of degrees training workers for Alaska’s business community. From business administration to human resources, each individual is an important piece of the whole.

Paula Bradison is the owner and managing director of staffing agency Alaska Executive Search. She obtained her associate’s degree in small business administration from the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and is a fourth generation Alaskan business owner.

While the company recruits some potential employees from the Lower 48, the majority of individuals who use Alaska Executive Search’s services are from Alaska, ranging from Bethel to Nome to Kotzebue.

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand? The last book I read was the autobiography of Tommy Franks [American Soldier by General Tommy Franks].

What movie do you recommend to everyone you know? Doctor Strangelove. It’s the best movie… ever. Peter Sellers is phenomenal.

If you could not live in Alaska, where would you live? I would explore the Southeast US States—the coastal area. I like the water. But my home is Alaska. I’m not going anywhere.

If could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be? A white Russian sable.

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand? The last book I read was the autobiography of Tommy Franks [American Soldier by General Tommy Franks].

What movie do you recommend to everyone you know? Doctor Strangelove. It’s the best movie… ever. Peter Sellers is phenomenal.

If you could not live in Alaska, where would you live? I would explore the Southeast US States—the coastal area. I like the water. But my home is Alaska. I’m not going anywhere.

If could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be? A white Russian sable.

Off the Cuff

Aves Thompson

A

ves Thompson has served as Executive Director at the Alaska Trucking Association (ATA) for the past twelve years. Prior to joining ATA, Thompson served as chief and director of the State of Alaska Division of Measurement Standards. This year he was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the National Conference on Weights and Measures.

Beer!

Beer!

Oktoberfest

T

he world’s biggest and oldest Oktoberfest runs for more than two weeks every year from late September to early October in Munich. Taking place annually since 1810, this beer festival and fair sees more than 6 million attendees.

Communities around the world have since initiated their own fall festivals that pay homage to Oktoberfest and celebrate food, fun, community, and (naturally) beer. As Alaska’s local brewing industry has sky-rocketed in the last few years, there’s never a short supply of new, local, and unique brewed options for Alaskans to sample and love throughout the fall across the state.

T

he world’s biggest and oldest Oktoberfest runs for more than two weeks every year from late September to early October in Munich. Taking place annually since 1810, this beer festival and fair sees more than 6 million attendees.

Communities around the world have since initiated their own fall festivals that pay homage to Oktoberfest and celebrate food, fun, community, and (naturally) beer. As Alaska’s local brewing industry has sky-rocketed in the last few years, there’s never a short supply of new, local, and unique brewed options for Alaskans to sample and love throughout the fall across the state.

Halloween Events

H

alloween in Alaska can be tricky, as end-of-October weather ranges from cold and dry to wet and slippery, and there’s no telling if one will be balancing on ice or trekking through several feet of snow. But Alaskans know these challenges, and there are events in every community that promote safe and fun (and sometimes warm) Halloween and fall activities.

Anchorage

Oct 27
Kid’s Halloween Train

Join the Alaska Railroad for the Halloween family fun: a ride on the rails complete with costumes, crafting, and tasty treats. The train travels 2.5 hours round-trip from Anchorage to Indian. Passengers enjoy monster-size fun, including a magician, crafts, balloon animals, Halloween-themed bingo, a raffle, and coloring contest. alaskarailroad.com

Oct 27
Trick or Treat Street

Trick or Treat Street is a free and fun event for families and children to trick or treat from business to business in downtown Anchorage in a safe and friendly environment from Noon to 4 p.m. anchoragedowntown.org

Juneau

Oct 20
MASK-erade Party

Fancy, silly, glitzy, or gruesome—put on a mask and join the Friends of the Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum for a fun evening of food, music, and dance at the Alaska State Museum from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. foslam.org

Skagway

Oct 27
Halloween Carnival

The whole family is invited to fun and festivities at the Halloween Carnival, taking place at the Skagway Recreation Center from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. skagwayrecreation.org

Events Calendar

Events Calendar

Anchorage

Oct 5-7
Make It Alaskan Festival

In its thirtieth year, this festival features more than 120 booths showcasing arts, crafts, food products, jewelry, produce, and homegrown products from artisans ranging from Utqiaġvik to Ketchikan. Entry to the festival at Dena’ina Center is free to the public. makeitalaskanfestival.com

Oct 26-27
Portugal. The Man

Join the Alaska Railroad for the Halloween family fun: a ride on the rails complete with costumes, crafting, and tasty treats. The train travels 2.5 hours round-trip from Anchorage to Indian. Passengers enjoy monster-size fun, including a magician, crafts, balloon animals, Halloween-themed bingo, a raffle, and coloring contest. alaskarailroad.com

Fairbanks

Oct 6-7
Go Winter! Expo

This event focuses on winter: how to get through it safely and sanely while having fun. This year will include the Interior Alaska Gun show, as well as indoor and outdoor activities, food, and information about winterization, home care, and travel ideas, all at the Carlson Center. fairbanksevents.com/go-winter-expo/

Juneau

Oct 13
Zero K Fun Non-Run

This event features live music from Fire on McGinnis and others, a pasta buffet for carb loading, a no-host bar, and non-alcoholic drinks. Participants will receive a race-day T-shirt and a 0.0 sticker to highlight their lack of achievement, all at the Hangar on the Wharf ballroom. jahc.org

Seward

Oct 5-7
Music & Arts Festival

The theme of this year’s festival is “Wilderness” and was inspired by the art of Rockwell Kent. This exciting conclusion to the busy summer season includes live music and dance performances along with local artisan craft and food vendors. The festival is held at the Dale R. Lindsey Alaska Railroad Intermodal Facility, which is heated and indoors. sewardfestival.com

Sitka

Oct 10-18
Alaska Day Festival

This festival commemorates the transfer of Alaska from Russia to the United States at Sitka in October 1867. This year’s theme is “Museums Preserving History.” The Alaska Day ball is on Tuesday, and other events include special lectures, exhibits, and displays; receptions, luncheons, and food sales; interpretive programs at museums and parks; and races and games. alaskadayfestival.org

Business Events

October

October 8-11

ATIA Annual Convention & Trade Show

Fairbanks: The Alaska Travel Industry Association is the leading nonprofit trade organization for the state’s tourism industry. The theme for this year’s conference is “The Great Escape.” alaskatia.org

October 8-12

AAHPA Annual Conference

Seward: This is the annual conference of the Alaska Association of Harbormasters & Port Administrators. alaskaharbors.org

October 11-14

All-Alaska Medical Conference

Alaska Native Heritage Center, Anchorage: A continuing medical education conference organized by the Alaska Academy of Physicians Assistants, providing up to twenty-five CMEs. akapa.org

October 18-20

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention

Dena’ina Center, Anchorage: The Alaska Federation of Natives Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one representative per twenty-five Native residents in the area, and delegate participation rates at the annual convention typically exceed 95 percent. nativefederation.org

October 23-25

Alaska Chamber Fall Forum

Westmark Fairbanks: Open to the public, the Alaska Chamber’s Annual Conference is the state’s premier business conference. The conference draws 200 to 225 attendees and features keynote speakers, panel discussions, and breakout sessions on issues of statewide concern to Alaska business. alaskachamber.com

Inside Alaska Business

Office of the Governor

Governor Bill Walker signed the following into law:

SB105—Improves medical transparency in Alaska, requiring healthcare providers to publicly post cost of services and provide good-faith estimates. It also improves billing for marital and family counseling.

HB267—Allows local governments to confirm that hunting and fishing activities subject to taxes within their jurisdictions are being accurately reported.

HB135—Gives Alaska school districts more time and flexibility to provide the local match required under the School Construction Grant Program, loosening the existing three-year deadline; it can now be extended by the Commissioner of the Department of Education and Early Development to a maximum of seven years.

HB212— Expands Alaska’s rural school construction fund so that major maintenance projects at existing schools can qualify for money, instead of funding only the construction of new schools.

Right Moves

Office of the Governor

The Anchorage Superior Court will welcome Una Gandbhir, Tom Matthews, and Josie Garton to the bench.

Gandbhir has practiced law in Alaska for twenty-four years, after law school at Northeastern and an internship with Alaska Legal Services.
Matthews has practiced law in Alaska for thirty-two years, after graduating from Lewis & Clark Law.
Garton has practiced law in Alaska for more than seventeen years. She graduated from Lewis & Clark Law before moving to Alaska to clerk for Chief Justice Warren Matthews.

The Bethel District Court also welcomes Will Montgomery to the bench.

Montgomery graduated from William Mitchell College of Law in 2010.

Alaska Trends

Top 49ers: Impact at Home and Beyond

Total Top 49ers Revenue more than $15.5 Billion

Alaska Native Corps $12,245,273,807
Construction & Engineering $352,588,287
Finance $273,965,024
Industrial Services $426,095,968
Mining $79,000,000
Retail/Wholesale $336,522,488
Transportation $1,155,800,000
Utility $635,538,932

Alaska Native Corps $12,245,273,807
Construction & Engineering $352,588,287
Finance $273,965,024
Industrial Services $426,095,968

Mining $79,000,000
Retail/Wholesale $336,522,488
Transportation $1,155,800,000
Utility $635,538,932

Alaska Native
Corporations
2017
Revenue
Change
from
2016
2018
Alaskan
Employees
Change
from
2017
2018
worldwide
Employees
Change
from
2017
Afognak Native
Corporation
$608,104,000 28.2% 158 4.6% 5,185 10.6%
Ahtna, Inc. $238,000,000 9.3% 309 -17.4% 1,380 -2.3%
Aleut Corporation $211,837,206 23.4% 184 -2.1% 929 -12.9%
Arctic Slope Regional
Corporation
$2,697,862,000 13.8% 3,715 0.8% 11,301 -0.1%
Bering Straits Native
Corporation
$357,900,000 9.8% 337 -36.9% 1,447 -7.6%
Bethel Native
Corporation
$99,197,518 38.2% 50 -16.7% 125 0.0%
Bristol Bay Native
Corporation
$1,659,345,000 8.8% 1,550 20.0% 3,860 -11.9%
Calista Corporation $480,200,000 -2.4% 800 1.5% 3,000 3.4%
Cape Fox Corporation $60,632,693 -4.6% 172 49.6% 748 30.1%
Chenega Corporation $876,000,000 -5.5% 219 -23.7% 5,600 -6.5%
Chugach Alaska
Corporation
$920,000,000 9.3% 1,000 25.0% 6,400 6.7%
Cook Inlet Region, Inc. $439,349,000 52.0% 284 0.4% 1,384 -1.4%
Doyon, Limited $290,548,000 -4.9% 591 10.1% 888 6.9%
Goldbelt, Incorporated $229,389,285 -3.1% 250 0.0% 1,500 0.0%
Koniag, Inc. $270,769,000 7.6% 59 7.3% 753 60.6%
NANA Regional
Corporation
$1,354,000,000 4.2% 4,796 -9.4% 12,251 -13.1%
Olgoonik Corporation $260,200,000 7.6% 114 12.9% 834 -16.7%
Sealaska $293,400,000 101.6% 50 -2.0% 300 13.6%
Sitnasuak Native
Corporation
$134,138,330 3.0% 91 -9.0% 871 -8.3%
Tanadgusix Corp. (TDX) $111,700,000 -8.6% 281 99.3% 639 11.7%
The Kuskokwim
Corporation
$104,276,146 17.5% 13 -13.3% 180 33.3%
Tyonek Native
Corporation
$78,000,000 -12.4% 37 729 84.1%
Ukpeagvik Inupiat
Corporation (UIC)
$470,425,629 10.9% 605 132.7% 4,450 78.0%
Alaska Native
Corporations total
$12,245,273,807 13.2% 15,665 10.1% 64,754 11.2%

Alaska Native Corporation: Afognak Native Corporation
2017 Revenue: $608,104,000
Change from 2016: 28.2%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 158
Change from 2017: 4.6%
2018 worldwide Employees: 5,185
Change from 2017: 10.6%

Alaska Native Corporation: Ahtna, Inc.
2017 Revenue: $238,000,000
Change from 2016: 9.3%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 309
Change from 2017: -17.4%
2018 worldwide Employees: 1,380
Change from 2017: -2.3%

Alaska Native Corporation: Aleut Corporation
2017 Revenue: $211,837,206
Change from 2016: 23.4%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 184
Change from 2017: -2.1%
2018 worldwide Employees: 929
Change from 2017: -12.9%

Alaska Native Corporation: Arctic Slope Regional Corporation
2017 Revenue: $2,697,862,000
Change from 2016: 13.8%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 3,715
Change from 2017: 0.8%
2018 worldwide Employees: 11,301
Change from 2017: -0.1%

Alaska Native Corporation: Bering Straits Native Corporation
2017 Revenue: $357,900,000
Change from 2016: 9.8%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 337
Change from 2017: -36.9%
2018 worldwide Employees: 1,447
Change from 2017: -7.6%

Alaska Native Corporation: Bethel Native Corporation
2017 Revenue: $99,197,518
Change from 2016: 38.2%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 50
Change from 2017: -16.7%
2018 worldwide Employees: 125
Change from 2017: 0.0%

Alaska Native Corporation: Bristol Bay Native Corporation
2017 Revenue: $1,659,345,000
Change from 2016: 8.8%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 1,550
Change from 2017: 20.0%
2018 worldwide Employees: 3,860
Change from 2017: -11.9%

Alaska Native Corporation: Calista Corporation
2017 Revenue: $480,200,000
Change from 2016: -2.4%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 800
Change from 2017: 1.5%
2018 worldwide Employees: 3,000
Change from 2017: 3.4%

Alaska Native Corporation: Cape Fox Corporation
2017 Revenue: $60,632,693
Change from 2016: -4.6%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 172
Change from 2017: 49.6%
2018 worldwide Employees: 748
Change from 2017: 30.1%

Alaska Native Corporation: Chenega Corporation
2017 Revenue: $876,000,000
Change from 2016: -5.5%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 219
Change from 2017: -23.7%
2018 worldwide Employees: 5,600
Change from 2017: -6.5%

Alaska Native Corporation: Chugach Alaska Corporation
2017 Revenue: $920,000,000
Change from 2016: 9.3%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 1,000
Change from 2017: 25.0%
2018 worldwide Employees: 6,400
Change from 2017: 6.7%

Alaska Native Corporation: Cook Inlet Region, Inc.
2017 Revenue: $439,349,000
Change from 2016: 52.0%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 284
Change from 2017: 0.4%
2018 worldwide Employees: 1,384
Change from 2017: -1.4%

Alaska Native Corporation: Doyon, Limited
2017 Revenue: $290,548,000
Change from 2016: -4.9%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 591
Change from 2017: 10.1%
2018 worldwide Employees: 888
Change from 2017: 6.9%

Alaska Native Corporation: Goldbelt, Incorporated
2017 Revenue: $229,389,285
Change from 2016: -3.1%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 250
Change from 2017: 0.0%
2018 worldwide Employees: 1,500
Change from 2017: 0.0%

Alaska Native Corporation: Koniag, Inc.
2017 Revenue: $270,769,000
Change from 2016: 7.6%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 59
Change from 2017: 7.3%
2018 worldwide Employees: 753
Change from 2017: 60.6%

Alaska Native Corporation: NANA Regional Corporation
2017 Revenue: $1,354,000,000
Change from 2016: 4.2%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 4,796
Change from 2017: -9.4%
2018 worldwide Employees: 12,251
Change from 2017: -13.1%

Alaska Native Corporation: Olgoonik Corporation
2017 Revenue: $260,200,000
Change from 2016: 7.6%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 114
Change from 2017: 12.9%
2018 worldwide Employees: 834
Change from 2017: -16.7%

Alaska Native Corporation: Sealaska
2017 Revenue: $293,400,000
Change from 2016: 101.6%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 50
Change from 2017: -2.0%
2018 worldwide Employees: 300
Change from 2017: 13.6%

Alaska Native Corporation: Sitnasuak Native Corporation
2017 Revenue: $134,138,330
Change from 2016: 3.0%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 91
Change from 2017: -9.0%
2018 worldwide Employees: 871
Change from 2017: -8.3%

Alaska Native Corporation: Tanadgusix Corp. (TDX)
2017 Revenue: $111,700,000
Change from 2016: -8.6%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 281
Change from 2017: 99.3%
2018 worldwide Employees: 639
Change from 2017: 11.7%

Alaska Native Corporation: The Kuskokwim Corporation
2017 Revenue: $104,276,146
Change from 2016: 17.5%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 13
Change from 2017: -13.3%
2018 worldwide Employees: 180
Change from 2017: 33.3%

Alaska Native Corporation: Tyonek Native Corporation
2017 Revenue: $78,000,000
Change from 2016: -12.4%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 37
Change from 2017:
2018 worldwide Employees: 729
Change from 2017: 84.1%

Alaska Native Corporation: Ukpeagvik Inupiat Corporation (UIC)
2017 Revenue: $470,425,629
Change from 2016: 10.9%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 605
Change from 2017: 132.7%
2018 worldwide Employees: 4,450
Change from 2017: 78.0%

Alaska Native Corporations total
2017 Revenue: $12,245,273,807
Change from 2016: 13.2%
2018 Alaskan Employees: 15,665
Change from 2017: 10.1%
2018 worldwide Employees: 64,754
Change from 2017: 11.2%

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Thanks for reading our October 2018 issue!