June 2020 | Volume 37 | Number 6 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Banking Money

How banks invest to strengthen their investment portfolio
By Tracy Barbour

Budding Industry Battles Black Market

Startup costs, complex permitting, and black market prices challenge legal marijuana business
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Consider a Consultant

Professional consultants help companies maintain, improve, and grow operations
By Tracy Barbour

Data Driven Decisions

Better tech, more information are a boon to oil field exploration
By Julie Stricker

Mining Economies

A few jobs go a long way
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Power pole and power line

Lines Above and Lines Below

Planning, constructing, and maintaining utility lines
By Sam Davenport
Casey Mapes

World-Class Walks

Exploring the lesser known branches of Anchorage’s trail system
By Amy Newman
JodyO. Photos

About The Cover

As the effects of COVID-19 linger long past periods of strict quarantine and hunker down efforts, transportation companies that quickly conformed to CDC recommendations and local mandates continue to adjust every step of the way to ensure Alaskans have what they need when they need it. Carlile President Terry Howard says: “The supply chain is uninterrupted, it’s fully functional, it’s efficient, it’s safe, and it’s working; behind the scenes we’re taking all the necessary precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19.”

Cover by Monica Sterchi-Lowman • Photography by Kerry Tasker

Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc. 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373. © 2020 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & December issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.
Two people standing on a bridge over rushing water

World-Class Walks

Exploring the lesser known branches of Anchorage’s trail system
By Amy Newman
JodyO. Photos

Banking Money

How banks invest to strengthen their investment portfolio
By Tracy Barbour

Budding Industry Battles Black Market

Startup costs, complex permitting, and black market prices challenge legal marijuana business
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Consider a Consultant

Professional consultants help companies maintain, improve, and grow operations
By Tracy Barbour

Data Driven Decisions

Better tech, more information are a boon to oil field exploration
By Julie Stricker

Mining Economies

A few jobs go a long way
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Power pole and power line

Lines Above and Lines Below

Planning, constructing, and maintaining utility lines
By Sam Davenport
Casey Mapes

About The Cover

As the effects of COVID-19 linger long past periods of strict quarantine and hunker down efforts, transportation companies that quickly conformed to CDC recommendations and local mandates continue to adjust every step of the way to ensure Alaskans have what they need when they need it. Carlile President Terry Howard says: “The supply chain is uninterrupted, it’s fully functional, it’s efficient, it’s safe, and it’s working; behind the scenes we’re taking all the necessary precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19.”

Cover by Monica Sterchi-Lowman • Photography by Kerry Tasker

Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc. 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, 
Alaska 99503-2577; 
Telephone: (907) 276-4373. 
© 2020 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & December issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.
Transportation Special Section
Two workers wearing masks while using a fork lift
How Alaska’s transporters continue to deliver
By Tasha Anderson
Span Alaska
Alaska’s aviation experts keep the Bush well-stocked
By Amy Newman
Safety corridors made even safer with multiple projects statewide
By Vanessa Orr
The aviation industry flies forward despite global pandemic
By Vanessa Orr
Robert Stapleton | Alaskafoto
Two workers wearing masks while using a fork lift
How Alaska’s transporters continue to deliver
By Tasha Anderson
Span Alaska
Alaska’s aviation experts keep the Bush well-stocked
By Amy Newman
Safety corridors made even safer with multiple projects statewide
By Vanessa Orr
Plane taking off on the runway
The aviation industry flies forward despite global pandemic
By Vanessa Orr
Robert Stapleton | Alaskafoto

Quick Reads

*Editor’s Note: Community Events and Business Events will not run this month as most events have been cancelled or postponed due to COVID-19. To see if a specific event has been cancelled, visit our COVID-19 resource page at akbizmag.com/covid-19/covid-19-updates/.

Alaska Business logo
Volume 37, #6
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 [email protected]
Associate/Web Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2910 [email protected]akbizmag.com
Art Director
Monica Sterchi-Lowman
257-2916 [email protected]
Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 [email protected]
Photo Contributor
Kerry Tasker
BUSINESS STAFF
President
Billie Martin
VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 [email protected]
VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 [email protected]
Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 [email protected]
Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 [email protected]
Accounting Manager
Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 [email protected]
Customer Service Representative
Emily Olsen
257-2914 [email protected]
CONTACT
Press releases:
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Send address changes to
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Anchorage, AK 99503

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From the Editor

Protecting Alaska’s Supply Chain
Kathryn Mackenzie

W

hen COVID-19 cases started popping up in Alaska, many residents headed straight to the grocery store to stock up on the basics: rice, beans, flour, anything with bleach or disinfectant, and, of course, toilet paper. And those were just people in the state’s urban areas. Rural residents were left wondering if they’d be able to feed, clothe, and care for their families as the world hunkered down to “flatten the curve.”

The run on stores for supplies is perhaps more understandable in Alaska than other states given that most of what we use and consume must be barged, shipped, driven, or flown here, and in early March not much was clear about the COVID-19 situation, including how the supply chain in Alaska would be affected by a worldwide pandemic. As it turns out, it hasn’t been.

Finance
Illustration of hands putting golden eggs in baskets
Banking Money
How banks invest to strengthen their investment portfolio
By Tracy Barbour

A

laska banks employ a variety of approaches to build their own investment portfolio and maintain a healthy balance sheet. While their strategies and tactics may differ, their primary objective is the same: to diversify their investments, minimize risk, and generate income.

Historically, financial regulators limited the types of investments that banks can pursue because they are essentially investing depositors’ funds. This helps to reduce risk and minimize the chance that banks are gambling away deposits on hedge funds or other higher-risk investments. Today many banks focus on fixed-income investments like government and corporate bonds, certificates of deposit, and money market funds to earn a steady stream of revenue with less risk than stocks. However, regulatory restrictions have been loosening over the years to allow financial institutions to broaden their investments options.

For financial institutions, the investment portfolio represents an important asset for their operation. At most banks, the investment portfolio serves as a secondary source of both earnings and liquidity. And at some banks, it’s a primary generator of investment earnings.

Agriculture
Budding Industry Battles Black Market
Startup costs, complex permitting, and black market prices challenge legal marijuana business
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
A

robust licensing and permitting process offers protection from federal prosecution for the Alaska cannabis industry, but the time and expense of participating in that process has created a market in which licensed businesses are vulnerable to being undercut by black-market prices.

When Alaska legalized cannabis for recreational use in 2015, the industry was able to quickly secure two prominent segments of the market.

“We were able to wrest very many individuals from the black market when the legal industry started. These were people who just wanted the convenience and could afford the higher prices, the people who really didn’t like only being able to go to their guy and just have whatever bags he had that day,” Good Titrations COO Brandon Emmett says. “And then we created a smaller but new consumer group: those individuals who like substances but are also very law abiding.”

anankkml | Envato Elements
Agriculture
Budding Industry Battles Black Market
Startup costs, complex permitting, and black market prices challenge legal marijuana business
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
anankkml | Envato Elements
Agriculture
Budding Industry Battles Black Market
Startup costs, complex permitting, and black market prices challenge legal marijuana business
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
anankkml | Envato Elements
A

robust licensing and permitting process offers protection from federal prosecution for the Alaska cannabis industry, but the time and expense of participating in that process has created a market in which licensed businesses are vulnerable to being undercut by black-market prices.

When Alaska legalized cannabis for recreational use in 2015, the industry was able to quickly secure two prominent segments of the market.

“We were able to wrest very many individuals from the black market when the legal industry started. These were people who just wanted the convenience and could afford the higher prices, the people who really didn’t like only being able to go to their guy and just have whatever bags he had that day,” Good Titrations COO Brandon Emmett says. “And then we created a smaller but new consumer group: those individuals who like substances but are also very law abiding.”

Professional Services
Consider a Consultant
Professional consultants help companies maintain, improve, and grow operations
By Tracy Barbour
A

nalytical Consulting Group uses a different approach to consulting with its clients in Alaska and the Lower 48. The Anchorage-based firm, which focuses on outsourced accounting and payroll services, doesn’t just tell companies what to do; it merges consulting with outsourcing services. “When you have someone that is employed in that position, we’re there as their mentor,” says President and CEO Matt Edman. “When they’re not there, we will do that job for them.”

Say, for example, a company’s CFO no longer wants to live in Alaska and unexpectedly resigns. Analytical Consulting Group has the expertise to fill the void. “We’re going to learn everything about your business so that if anybody steps away, we can step in,” Edman says. “For most of our clients, we’re their business continuity plan.”

Consider a Consultant
Professional consultants help companies maintain, improve, and grow operations
By Tracy Barbour
A

nalytical Consulting Group uses a different approach to consulting with its clients in Alaska and the Lower 48. The Anchorage-based firm, which focuses on outsourced accounting and payroll services, doesn’t just tell companies what to do; it merges consulting with outsourcing services. “When you have someone that is employed in that position, we’re there as their mentor,” says President and CEO Matt Edman. “When they’re not there, we will do that job for them.”

Say, for example, a company’s CFO no longer wants to live in Alaska and unexpectedly resigns. Analytical Consulting Group has the expertise to fill the void. “We’re going to learn everything about your business so that if anybody steps away, we can step in,” Edman says. “For most of our clients, we’re their business continuity plan.”

Transportation
The Unbroken Supply Chain
How Alaska’s transporters continue to deliver
By Tasha Anderson
Kerry Tasker
Editor’s Note: This article was written in mid-April; as Alaska has tentatively reopened for business, the transportation companies that contributed to this article have adjusted, and will continue to adjust, their policies and procedures accordingly.

A

laskans have some experience both with isolation and sudden emergencies. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, seasonal flooding, and wildfires seldom schedule their arrival. And while emerging technology and developing infrastructure have allowed Alaska to become more connected, as Alaskans we know we’re still at the end of the road—even more so for those living beyond the road in Alaska’s remote communities.

So while the sudden appearance of COVID-19 in our lives, quickly followed by orders to stop leaving our homes or socializing with anyone, was definitely not normal, at its root it wasn’t completely unfamiliar, and across the state Alaskans demonstrated once again their willingness to do what needs to be done to take care of each other.

Transportation
Transportation
Rob Stapleton | Alaskafoto
Alaska’s Aces
The aviation industry flies forward despite global pandemic
By Vanessa Orr
T

he importance of the aviation industry to Alaska can’t be understated; not only does it provide a huge number of jobs in the state—almost 8 percent of all employment—but it is also responsible for transporting much of the food, products, and other necessities that residents need in their daily lives.

The industry also transports tourists, who bring money into the state, as well as much of the equipment needed to keep Alaska’s manufacturing and natural resource industries running. And with more than 82 percent of Alaska’s communities not connected to the road system, it is at times a literal lifeline for those living outside the handful of urban areas.

Transportation
High Flyin’ Goods and Groceries
Aviation experts keep the Bush well-stocked
By Amy Newman
R

eality television has painted a somewhat distorted picture of life in Bush Alaska. Shows like Alaskan Bush People and Alaska: The Last Frontier depict families living life off-the-grid, chopping wood to build their cabins, and hunting and gathering to put food on the table.

But even the hardiest of those living in the Alaska Bush head to the store at least occasionally to stock their pantry and purchase clothes, furniture, and other personal items.

It just takes a bit more effort—and an airplane—to do what is an easy afternoon errand for the rest of Alaska.

“We’re a service provider,” says Clinton White, owner and operator of Anchorage-based Greatland Grocery & Supply, an online store that serves all of Alaska. “We market ourselves as a grocery store, but really we’re a supplier of goods that Bush communities need.”

Even for businesses that predominantly serve more traditional customers, Bush orders still comprise a significant portion of their sales.

“It’s amazing how much stuff goes out in the Bush,” says Ron Bailey, president of Bailey’s Furniture, which has showrooms in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Wasilla, and Soldotna. “I’d estimate that 10 to 15 percent of our sales are Bush orders.”

Transportation
High Flyin’ Goods and Groceries
Aviation experts keep the Bush well-stocked
By Amy Newman
R

eality television has painted a somewhat distorted picture of life in Bush Alaska. Shows like Alaskan Bush People and Alaska: The Last Frontier depict families living life off-the-grid, chopping wood to build their cabins, and hunting and gathering to put food on the table.

But even the hardiest of those living in the Alaska Bush head to the store at least occasionally to stock their pantry and purchase clothes, furniture, and other personal items.

It just takes a bit more effort—and an airplane—to do what is an easy afternoon errand for the rest of Alaska.

“We’re a service provider,” says Clinton White, owner and operator of Anchorage-based Greatland Grocery & Supply, an online store that serves all of Alaska. “We market ourselves as a grocery store, but really we’re a supplier of goods that Bush communities need.”

Even for businesses that predominantly serve more traditional customers, Bush orders still comprise a significant portion of their sales.

“It’s amazing how much stuff goes out in the Bush,” says Ron Bailey, president of Bailey’s Furniture, which has showrooms in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Wasilla, and Soldotna. “I’d estimate that 10 to 15 percent of our sales are Bush orders.”

Plans Change.
Deadlines Don’t.

Important shipment? No need to worry. You can check the status from anywhere using Lynden’s new mobile app.
Innovative Transportation Solutions
Transportation
Designated Driving
Safety corridors made even safer with multiple projects statewide
By Vanessa Orr
Transportation
Designated Driving
Safety corridors made even safer with multiple projects statewide
By Vanessa Orr
S

ummertime is construction season in Alaska, and while no one can yet predict what the tourist season holds, Alaska’s highways are already heavily used, even before the influx of independent travelers.

There are some places where substantial traffic—and sometimes road conditions—make it more hazardous for drivers to traverse. As a result, Alaska’s Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (DOT&PF) has established Safety Corridors in areas with a higher than average incidence of fatal and serious injury crashes. DOT&PF is also responsible for overseeing the federal Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP), which identifies and funds a wide variety of highway safety projects with the goal of saving lives and reducing injuries.

Transportation Directory
Transportation Directory
40-Mile Air
Leif Wilson, Owner
PO Box 539
Tok, AK 99780
40-mileair.com
[email protected]
907-883-5191
Air charters, scheduled flights, and hunting operation.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1959/1959 |10/10
ACE Air Cargo
Mike Bergt, Pres.
5901 Lockheed Ave.
Anchorage, AK 99502
907-334-5100
On demand passenger charters throughout Alaska. Cargo transportation provider offering scheduled cargo service to twenty-one locations in Alaska. ACE Logistics freight-forwarding and logistics provider.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1988/ 1988 | 150/150
Ace Delivery & Moving
Hank Schaub, GM
PO Box 221389
Anchorage, AK 99522
alaskanace.com
[email protected]
907-522-6684
Air cargo and express-package services, arrangement of transportation of freight, freight-transportation services, local delivery services, local trucking with storage, and third-party logistics. Residential and office moves.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1994/1994 | 12/12
Alaska Air Cargo
Torque Zubeck, Mng. Dir.
4700 Old International Airport Rd.
Anchorage, AK 99502
alaskacargo.com
[email protected]
800-225-2752
Goldstreak package express, Pet Connect Animal Travel, priority and general air freight services. Our modern fleet of 737-700 freighters serves 19 Alaska communities with connections to more than 100 destinations in the Lower 48, Hawaii, and beyond.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1932/1932 | 24,000/3,000
Alaska Air Forwarding
Jeff Dornes, Co-Owner
4000 W. 50th Ave., Ste. 6
Anchorage, AK 99502
[email protected]
907-248-4697
Air freight, trade shows, shipment consolidations, nationwide purchase order procurement service, and international shipping.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1969/1969 | 40/5
Alaska Air Transit
Daniel Owen, Pres./Owner/Operator
2301 Merrill Field Dr.
Anchorage, AK 99501
FlyAAT.com
[email protected]
907-276-5422
Anchorage based air charters through Alaska, Canada, and the Lower 48. Fleet includes fast, pressurized, Pilatus PC-12/47 and PC-12 NG, as well as factory new Grand Caravan EX aircraft with increased power and advanced ice protection system.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1984/1984 | 23/23
Oil & Gas
Data Driven Decisions
Better tech, more information are a boon to oil field exploration
By Julie Stricker
Oil & Gas
Data Driven Decisions
Better tech, more information are a boon to oil field exploration
By Julie Stricker
G

eologists knew more than a century ago there was oil on Alaska’s North Slope. A 1921 report to the US Geological Survey that discussed Alaska petroleum noted areas of the state had oil seeps that looked commercially promising, including “some indications of oil in the extreme northern part of Alaska, a region at present almost inaccessible.”

At that time, geologists relied on obvious signs of oil, such as seeps, to find potential oil fields. In the ‘20s, a method of using sound waves to define underground rock layers was developed. Called 2D seismic surveys, they allowed geologists to see thin slices of the layers of rock underground. In the ‘80s, 3D surveys widened and sharpened that view. Today, 4D surveys are common. Each advance resulted in more data points for a more accurate look at what was happening underground.

What’s Your Position?
Janis Plume headshot
By Janis Plume
Senior Account Manager

I

t’s important to take a stand in life, to be steadfast in who you are. The same can be said for your business—and how you position it in the marketplace. In a marketing sense, positioning is how your business, products, and services are perceived to be different from those of your competitors.

Here are three steps that will allow you to establish a strong marketing position:

1. Develop a Positioning Strategy—
Analyze the characteristics of your business and those of your competitors. Be honest about your strengths and weaknesses as you determine how your business stacks up. Research your competitors to determine what they’re doing and identify how you do it better. What does your business offer that’s unique? How do you excel and what expertise do you have over your competition? How do you want your clients to think about and view your business? Formalize this strategy in writing and discuss it with your staff to make sure everyone is on the same page.

MINING

Mining
Economie$
A few jobs go a long way
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
mbaysan | iStock
Mining
Mining
Economie$
Mining
Economie$
A few jobs go a long way
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Alaska construction worker
mbaysan | iStock
T

he mining industry plays an important role in the economy of more than seventy communities throughout the state. Whether the mines produce zinc, lead, coal, gravel, silver, or gold, the direct and indirect financial impacts on the surrounding area are significant, according to a McDowell Group report commissioned by the Alaska Mining Association.

“The most important impacts are related first to the jobs and the wages that a mine creates,” McDowell Group Senior Vice President Jim Calvin says.

“Mines are fairly labor intensive; they will typically employ several hundred workers. And mines are also often among the largest employers in terms of headcount and total payroll over the course of a year.”

CONSTRUCTION
Lines
Above
and
Lines
Below
Casey Mapes
Construction
Alaska Worker working on telephone pole
Casey Mapes
Lines
Above
and
Lines
Below
Planning, constructing,
and
maintaining utility lines
By Sam Davenport
T

he decision to bury a utility line depends on many factors, such as climate and population density. Alaska’s utilities decide how to provide services to a community based on its needs and characteristics.

Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC) has more power plants than all of Alaska’s other electric cooperatives combined. The nonprofit serves residents in fifty-eight locations across Alaska, from Kodiak Island to Yakutat and Minto, which is the only community in the cooperative’s network accessible by road. AVEC runs more than 150 diesel generators for more than 400,000 hours a year to provide services to its customers.

Tourism
World-Class Walks
Exploring the lesser known branches of Anchorage’s trail system
By Amy Newman
JodyO. Photos
N

obody anticipates summer quite like Alaskans. Months of darkness, mountains of snow, and freezing temperatures yield, seemingly overnight, to long, sunlit days and, with the kids out of school, time to travel to the Lower 48 and beyond for vacation.

Summer 2020, however, is shaping up to be more than just a little bit different.

As this article is being written, Alaskans are hunkered down at home. Every resident or visitor who enters the state—whether by land, sea, or air—is subject to a mandatory 14-day home quarantine, causing many to cancel travel plans. The cruise ship industry, which brings more than 1 million visitors to the state each summer, has canceled excursions through at least June 30; airlines have reduced flights in and out of the state; and all but the most essential services are closed.

Inside Alaska Business
Alaska Materials
Alaska Materials, a wholesale supplier of construction, building, and specialty materials, announced a Master Distribution Agreement with Diamond Grid, which produces a surface stabilization and erosion control system that can be used for shed floors, camp paths, mine access roads, feed and water troughs, parking lots, golf courses, driveways, and more. The agreement is exclusive to develop Alaska and provides an open door to further development in the Lower 48.
alaskamaterials.com

Trilogy Metals
Trilogy Metals reported the public release of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Ambler Mining District Industrial Access Project in late March.

Following the US Bureau of Land Management releasing the EIS, the final step in the permitting process for the project is the issuance of the Record of Decision by the BLM and the issuance of the Clean Water Act Section 404 permit from the US Army Corp of Engineers. Trilogy Metals expects these two items to be issued concurrently within the next couple of months.
trilogymetals.com

Economic Indicators
ANS Crude Oil Production
446,368 barrels
-13% change from previous month
4/30/2020
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources
ANS West Coast Crude Oil Prices
$13.03 per barrel
40% change from previous month
5/1/2020
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources
Statewide Employment
345,010 Labor Force
5.6% Unemployment
3/1/2020. Adjusted seasonally.
Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Right Moves
Alaska USA
Bob Warthen has been selected to fill the position of Vice President, Commercial Services Administration, Business and Commercial Services. Warthen is a skilled leader with more than twenty-five years of industry experience. He has been employed with Alaska USA since 2005, most recently as credit administration manager.
Bob Warthen headshot
Warthen
APU
Alaska Pacific University (APU) selected Valerie Nurr’araaluk Davidson as its next President. Davidson served as commissioner of the Alaska Department of Health & Social Services and then the lieutenant governor under then-Governor Bill Walker. Prior to that, she worked for more than fifteen years as a national policymaker, focusing on matters affecting Indigenous health.

Davidson earned a juris doctorate with a certificate in Indian law from the University of New Mexico School of Law and a bachelor’s degree in education with a minor in bilingual education from the University of Alaska Southeast.

Valerie Nurr’araaluk Davidson headshot
Davidson
Right Moves is sponsored by Northern Air Cargo
Northern Air Cargo plane
Keeping Alaska Open for Business
Northern Air Cargo is committed to continuing our cargo operations while maintaining the health and safety of our customers and employees.

Regulations are changing constantly. For the most up-to-date information visit www.nac.aero.

Northern Air Cargo plane tail
Northern Air Cargo is committed to continuing our cargo operations while maintaining the health and safety of our customers and employees.

Regulations are changing constantly. For the most up-to-date information visit www.nac.aero.

Northern Air Cargo plane tail

Alaska Trends

T

his year, celebrating the transportation industry in June seems particularly well-timed; despite a global pandemic, our transportation professionals have kept shelves stocked and people moving (whenever moving people couldn’t be avoided) while adhering to strict cleanliness and safety protocols. Through it all, Alaskans have been able to rely on an industry that takes its responsibilities to the communities it serves seriously.

It requires infrastructure, equipment, and expertise to “Keep Alaska Moving,” so for our June Alaska Trends we’re presenting a little more information about transportation in the Last Frontier. The facts presented here are sourced from Department Fast Facts: Prepared for Legislative Session 2020 by the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities.

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