Junior Achievement of Alaska Celebrates 50 years
Flora Teo
President
(CENTER)

Rebecca Hilton
VP of Elementary Programs
(RIGHT)

Tiana Taylor
Special Events Manager
(LEFT)

January 2023
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January 2023 | VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 1 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Kivalina Landfill

Photo Essay
Doug Huntman | Delta Backhaul Co
a man stands at the Kivalina Landfill with arms outstretched for a picture

2023 Alaska Economic Forecast

Ready for recovery, dragged by workforce woes
By Katie Pesznecker

Your Money or Your File

Combatting ransomware threats
By Tracy Barbour
a girl pictured in mid-air during a play at the Native Youth Olympics

Traditional Skills Inform Today’s Games

Native Youth Olympics promote strength, endurance, good sportsmanship
By Vanessa Orr
Cook Inlet Tribal Council

Traditional Skills Inform Today’s Games

Native Youth Olympics promote strength, endurance, good sportsmanship
By Vanessa Orr
Cook Inlet Tribal Council

Kivalina Landfill

Photo Essay
Doug Huntman | Delta Backhaul Co

About The Cover

2023 marks the 50th Anniversary of Junior Achievement (JA) of Alaska, which has worked tirelessly over a half-century to make sure Alaskan students have access to high-quality information on finance, entrepreneurship, and workforce readiness. This month our cover features the people behind the scenes of that amazing mission, putting President Flora Teo, Vice President of Elementary Programs Rebecca Hilton, and Special Events Manager Tiana Taylor front and center. That’s not a position they occupy at most JA of Alaska events, usually because they’re working. All. The. Time.

They would be the first to say that it’s the community—engaged educators, volunteer business leaders, and generous corporate contributions—that make JA of Alaska’s mission possible. Whether you’ve worked with JA of Alaska before, or if you’ve never heard of the program, take a minute to visit their website (alaska.ja.org) to learn more about how you can help educate Alaska’s future.

Cover Photo: Photo Arts by Janna | Monica Sterchi-Lowman

Alaska Business January 2023 issue cover
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc. 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373. © 2023 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & October issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.
Photo: Phase 2 construction of the Lower Yukon River Regional Port in Emmonak.
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From the Editor

I enjoy the holidays and the progression of themes they follow, particularly in Alaska. In October the Permanent Fund Dividend launches the shopping season, which benefits the state’s communities, whether Alaskans use the dividend for debt relief, to invest in projects, or just for fun. Then we move into Thanksgiving, and we shift our focus to gratitude and sharing, both among our loved ones and with those we don’t know personally but know need help. Whatever your religious background (or lack thereof), December holiday season traditions encourage families and friends to gather together and be inspired by the potential for goodness that people have. And then the New Year rounds it out, when we take stock of the past and make plans for the future.

Time moves forward unceasingly, but the cyclical nature of our planet and the impact that has had on our culture has created these yearly opportunities to reflect on the things that truly make our lives rich and what’s been and what’s to come.

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Volume 39, #1
Editorial Staff
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FINANCE
2023 Alaska Economic Forecast
Ready for recovery, dragged by workforce woes
By Katie Pesznecker
Alaska Business
2023 Alaska Economic Forecast
Ready for recovery, dragged by workforce woes
By Katie Pesznecker
A

s Alaska continues climbing out from the COVID-19 pandemic, the state’s economy remains among the nation’s lowest performing, yet other indicators suggest potential for growth and recovery in 2023 and beyond.

While nearly half of other states have rebounded, Alaska is still reaching for pre-pandemic job levels, according to the October 2022 Alaska Economic Trends report published by the Alaska State Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Furthermore, a study published in November 2022 by the Alaska Center for Economic Development at UAA made a case that, for the last seven years, Alaska’s economy ranked “at or near the bottom” in key economic health measures compared to its national counterparts.

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Telecom & Tech
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Combatting ransomware threats
By Tracy Barbour
R

ansomware is the top cybersecurity threat to businesses today—and it is expanding at an alarming rate. In 2020, Alaska reported a record number of complaints about ransomware and other cybercrimes to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3). On a per-person basis, Alaska recently ranked as one of the country’s least secure states, according to Todd Clark, president of DenaliTEK and Cybersecure Alaska. “Per capita, Alaska had more cybercrimes reported in both 2018 and 2019 than any other state in America,” he says. “Alaska was 4th least secure in both 2020 and 2021.”

“Alaska is home to many military bases, energy companies, and government agencies,” says David W. Monroe, a cybersecurity consultant with Computer Task Group (CTG), which provides digital transformation solutions. “These industries and organizations have always been prime targets for ransomware attacks. Recently, news agencies in Alaska have been reporting on an increase in attacks on educational institutions as well.”

Junior Achievement
Junior Achievement of Alaska Celebrates 50 Years
Educating young Alaskans in financial literacy, work readiness, and entrepreneurship
By Flora Teo and Beth Barnes
A graphical illustrative digital representation of financial symbols and icons
2

023 is particularly special for Junior Achievement (JA) of Alaska as we celebrate our 50th Anniversary. Fifty years ago in 1973, C. H. Rosenthal, Joseph P. Wiley, Dave Stein, and Les Pace established an organization to teach financial literacy, work readiness, and entrepreneurship to Alaska’s youth, helping them acquire the skills they needed to succeed in a changing economy.

The initial endeavor was called “Stop ‘Em from Droppin,” a partnership with the then-Anchorage Borough School District, business community, and S.A.V.E. aimed at allowing students, “through ownership of their own companies, to develop a realization of honesty and dependability in the world of work” and to “instill in young people a sense of responsibility for the successful functioning of American business and government during their lifetime.”

Junior Achievement
2023 Alaska Business Hall of Fame Laureates
By Tasha Anderson
T

he Alaska Business Hall of Fame honors Alaskans who have made ongoing, significant contributions to the Alaska business community. They have established strong relationships within that community, donated their time and expertise to nonprofit and charitable causes, and built up the Alaska economy through their dedication, innovation, and leadership. The path that each laureate takes is highly varied, but they all start with a first job.

Below, we get to know the 2023 Alaska Business Hall of Fame laureates a little better, starting with their origin stories. To learn more about the laureates, the induction ceremony is being held January 19. Visit Alaska.ja.org for more details.

Junior Achievement
Andy Elliott
Sean Schubert

To Teach and to Serve

JA’s high-achieving educators and volunteers

By Scott Rhode
E

ach year, JA of Alaska recognizes an educator and a volunteer who have gone above and beyond to support the program and Alaska’s students as they learn critical financial information and skills. According to JA of Alaska Executive Director Flora Teo, “Volunteers are the backbone of JA. We have a lot of talented, amazing leaders in our business community, and it is truly special when you see volunteers walk into a classroom and see the excitement on kids’ faces.”

While JA volunteers are critical for the program, it’s educators who work every day to make sure Alaska’s students are prepared for the future. “Alaska has amazing educators who rally for our students every day,” Teo says.

Junior Achievement
Business Name: PJ’s Perfect Parties
JA CEO: Penelope
Business Description: This company will plan your next family gathering, celebration, birthday party, et cetera. Parties include an on-site specialist and a consultation where the customer can provide details to make the event extra special. This business will plan events of all sizes.

Junior Achievement

kid giving presentation for "Survive-it Jacket"
Business Name: PJ’s Perfect Parties
JA CEO: Penelope
Business Description: This company will plan your next family gathering, celebration, birthday party, et cetera. Parties include an on-site specialist and a consultation where the customer can provide details to make the event extra special. This business will plan events of all sizes.

Junior Achievement

From the Mouths of JA CEOS
JA Biz Camp 2022
I

n July 2022 Junior Achievement (JA) of Alaska launched its first Biz Camp with the goal to ignite the entrepreneurial spirit among young people in Alaska.

Campers were divided by grade level and spent the week developing their business plans while learning about leadership and teamwork through physical fitness with the support of their camp counselors.

Thanks to support from the Alaska Community Foundation and Cook Inlet Region, Inc., students walked away with a business plan ready to put into action, and four students went home with seed money for their idea.

As JA board member Ryan Cropper often says, “Big businesses start as small businesses.”

If you think your student would benefit from Biz Camp—and you’re right—registration for that and three other new programs is now open at Alaska.ja.org.

Junior Achievement

Upper One Studios

Upper One Studios

Helping small businesses and nonprofits find a marketing niche

By Vanessa Orr

W

hile working for the Alaska Department of Corrections, Rick Mallars and Tom Karpow were given the opportunity to create a probation/parole orientation video that could spread a consistent message across corresponding state offices. After spending a month creating the project, the duo discussed how much fun it would be to make videos for a living. Thirteen years later, they’re doing just that—and much more.

“We made the video, which was well-received, and that gave us the idea to start a video production company,” says Mallars, president and CEO of Upper One Studios. “I walked into my supervisor’s office and asked him if they would have hired me if I had my own company and had come in at a reasonable price, and he said yes. So I put in my two-weeks’ notice.”

Mallars cashed out his retirement and bought three cameras, audio equipment, and an editing program. He also came up with the name for the company, which refers to Alaska being the “Upper One state” above the Lower 48.

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Traditional Skills Inform Today’s Games
Native Youth Olympics promote strength, endurance, good sportsmanship
By Vanessa Orr
E

ach year, approximately 2,000 students statewide take part in Native Youth Olympics (NYO) junior and senior games, athletic contests based on skills crucial to Alaska Natives people’s traditional way of life. More than just a display of athletic prowess, the events focus on promoting healthy lifestyles, positive self-esteem, leadership skills, and good sportsmanship through friendly athletic competition.

Now in its 51st year, Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) has been hosting the games since 1986, and NYO remains an active program within its Youth Empowerment Services Department.

“Our CITC staff, along with volunteers, provide all of the logistical and event planning support, fundraising, and marketing and promotion for the event and related activities each year,” says Tim Blum, senior marketing and communications specialist for CITC. “It’s a huge effort.”

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Visit our ANCSA Resource Center
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Construction
Kivalina Landfill
The village of Kivalina, northwest of Kotzebue, was already in grave danger. The barrier island on which it sits (bottom right) is forecast to be underwater before this decade is over. Then the remnants of Typhoon Merbok struck the Western Alaska coast in mid-September, scattering debris around the area (bottom left).
The village of Kivalina, northwest of Kotzebue, was already in grave danger. The barrier island on which it sits (below) is forecast to be underwater before this decade is over. Then the remnants of Typhoon Merbok struck the Western Alaska coast in mid-September, scattering debris around the area (far bottom).
Debris from Typhoon Merbok on shore with excavator in background
Aerial view of Kivalina barrier island
Luckily, Kivalina was prepared. Work had begun earlier in the summer on rehabilitation of the village landfill, led by Delta Backhaul Co. “Due to the recent landfill cover and newly fenced-in waste collection area,” says company owner Doug Huntman, “environmental damage was kept to a minimum.”

Delta Backhaul, aided by local laborers, tidied up the 6.7-acre site, closing the majority of the old landfill through consolidation, compaction, and cover and developing a more manageable 1-acre site. All the better for Kivalina’s eventual relocation, whenever that massive effort takes place.

Industrial Support Services
Doug Huntman | Delta Backhaul Co
Industrial Support Services typography
Industrial Support Services
Behind the curtain of Alaska’s superstar industries, a crew of peripheral businesses keeps the whole show moving. These industrial support services are specialists in their niche, satisfying operational needs that no single company can manage on its own.

Of these supporting players, several equipment dealers have found an advantageous spot at the crossroads of high revenue and local ownership. Construction Machinery Industrial, Airport Equipment Rentals, and Craig Taylor Equipment all rank alongside their major building contractor clients among the Top 49ers (Alaska companies ranked by gross revenue). “Equipment Rentals” visits some of their peers, unfolding a map of how to succeed in equipment rental.

Industries need room to work and to store materials and inventory, and that’s the job of warehouse support businesses. It’s not as easy as rolling up the door on a big empty shed, as shown in “Where Oh Where Have Warehouses Gone?”

Every industry can benefit from professional insight, whether in the form of economic consulting or communications. “Clarity from Confusion” reports on Alaska’s biggest private research firms, while guest author Sarah Erkmann Ward of Blueprint Alaska shares her expertise with connecting to the public, particularly for resource development projects.

Other industries may live in the spotlight, but (to extend the metaphor) they would be in the dark without a stagehand to light the way.

Industrial support services

Equipment Rentals

A temporary toolbox has the right equipment at the right time
By Rachael Kvapil
C

harles Klever, president of Yukon Equipment, Inc., says his company regularly rents a variety of heavy construction vehicles, including dozers, loaders, backhoes, sweepers, compaction rollers, and more. However, Yukon Equipment has recently seen a rise in the demand for excavators at all three of their locations in Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Wasilla. The main inventory of full-size excavators runs from 29,000 pounds to 55,000 pounds and comes with steel and rubber tracks. Several have front blades, and almost all come equipped with multiple buckets and hydraulic thumbs.

lucato | iStock

Industrial support services

lucato | iStock

Equipment Rentals

A temporary toolbox has the right equipment at the right time

By Rachael Kvapil

C

harles Klever, president of Yukon Equipment, Inc., says his company regularly rents a variety of heavy construction vehicles, including dozers, loaders, backhoes, sweepers, compaction rollers, and more. However, Yukon Equipment has recently seen a rise in the demand for excavators at all three of their locations in Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Wasilla. The main inventory of full-size excavators runs from 29,000 pounds to 55,000 pounds and comes with steel and rubber tracks. Several have front blades, and almost all come equipped with multiple buckets and hydraulic thumbs.

Groundbreaking typography
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Construction of Span Alaska’s new Fairbanks Service Center (FSC) is underway, but it is breaking ground in more ways than one. Our FSC will be one of the most technologically modern, efficient, and purpose-driven transportation facilities ever built in Fairbanks.

Coming in the summer of 2023, Span’s FSC will increase our capacity, improve security, offer customizable storage areas, and streamline freight handling — all to ensure faster, smoother, and more consistent delivery of your product to its final destination.

To schedule a pickup or find the Span location nearest you, call 1-800-257-7726 or visit us at spanalaska.com.

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Industrial support services

Where Oh Where Have Warehouses Gone?

Creative uses of industrial storage space

By Scott Rhode
W

arehouses are easy to ignore. Almost by definition, they are places that the general public passes by but rarely visits.

“Most of the time you don’t allow the public inside because of the safety requirements,” says Rosita Johnson, business development manager for Advanced Supply Chain International (ASCI) in Anchorage. The company manages inventory contained inside buildings stacked to the roof with pallets, forklifts scooting to and fro.

A warehouse is defined less by its form than by function. “It doesn’t have anything to do with what the building looks like; it is what the zoning allows you to do in that building,” explains Elisha Martin, a real estate broker with Colliers International. While many warehouses have large roll-up doors, some don’t. Most are designed around access for delivery trucks, and as a rule they are places where only people who work there ever see the inside.

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STEP INTO ALASKA’S FUTURE WITH UAF eCAMPUS

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  • Encourage your employees to complete their degree or certification online!
  • UAF eCampus Business Partnerships offer discounts.
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By Janis Plume
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very few months, I’m asked to write a short article about advertising strategies, including the print and digital products offered by Alaska Business.

I sometimes mention our one-on- one service and how we build strong relationships. I genuinely believe the best service and advice come from frank discussions with clients over time.

I could tell you more about how I feel about Alaska Business and what it has to offer—or you can hear it from our clients…

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Industrial Support Services
Connecting with Communities
9 tips for resource development communications
By Sarah Erkmann Ward
Carter Damaska | Alaska Business
G

ood communication is critical for any business or industry. This is especially true when developing natural resources in Alaska, where nothing is more indicative of a project’s success or failure than the quality of communication with stakeholders.

It’s not an easy task. The list of development projects that enjoyed early success or showed incredible promise only to be relegated to the dustbin of Alaska history is long. Of course, economics ultimately determines if projects move forward. But in many cases, the frequency and tone of communications plays an outsized role, ultimately impacting the economics.

So, what are some best practices, especially at a time when Alaska is poised to benefit from several new, large-scale development projects?

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MARCH 29-31, 2023
HOSTED AT THE DENA’INA CONVENTION CENTER
In Anchorage, Alaska
ARCTIC ENCOUNTER
Join 1,000+ leading government officials, politicians, business executives and investors, indigenous leaders, scientists, military officials, and guests from 15+ countries at the 2023 Arctic Encounter. Proudly hosted in Anchorage, this world-class event is North America’s largest Arctic policy and business convening.
Industrial Support Services
Clarity from Confusion
When businesses have questions, private research firms have answers
By Tara O’Hanley
Agnew::Beck
S

ome exacting economists shy away from using the word “unique” to describe Alaska’s particularities, but local knowledge clearly helps to answer the types of questions that specialized consultants tackle every day. Behind the scenes, they provide answers—or, at least, very educated guesses—to big questions: How are key industries like mining, fishing, and oil and gas development expected to grow, shift, or decline? How can rural communities arrive at consensus on heated topics, and then turn those agreements into action? What would be the economic impact on the state if, say, the Alaska LNG pipeline project moved forward?

Through a combination of field work, data collection, and number crunching, local firms such as Northern Economics, McKinley Research Group, and Agnew::Beck Consulting have been transforming confusion into clarity for decades. “Maybe it’s not that Alaska’s necessarily unique by an economic definition, but we believe that we have a context here that has to be understood to help the kind of clients we really want to help,” says Katie Berry, McKinley’s Director of Economics and Research. “Our work is largely focused on helping Alaskan industries, communities, and people drive themselves forward and make the next set of decisions for their businesses and organizations.”

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turning the page
Industrial Support Services

Carter Damaska | Alaska Business

The co-owners of Donlin Gold have yet to make the go-ahead decision, yet exploration and pre-development have kept workers busy at the site for twenty-five years.

Carter Damaska | Alaska Business

two construction workers use drills while working on a foundation
The co-owners of Donlin Gold have yet to make the go-ahead decision, yet exploration and pre-development have kept workers busy at the site for twenty-five years.

Carter Damaska | Alaska Business

construction workers stand near a green helicopter at a site
Worth Waiting For
Slow but steady progress for the
Donlin Gold development
By Alexandra Kay
T

hough placer mines had been in the Middle Kuskokwim area for decades, the official discovery of the Donlin Gold deposit in the late ‘80s led to one of the largest undeveloped gold projects in the world. Expected to take three to four years to construct, the mine aims to produce 1.1 million ounces of gold each year over its twenty-seven-year lifespan. The deposit is five times the average size of its peer mines, according to NOVAGOLD, one of the partners on the project.

Donlin Gold has been conducting environmental studies and developing engineering plans for the site for more than twenty years. In 1996, landowners Calista Corporation and The Kuskokwim Corporation (TKC) came to an agreement that gave a company called Placer Dome mining rights at Donlin Creek. Placer Dome was eventually purchased by Barrick Gold Corporation, and Donlin Gold is now owned in equal parts by Barrick Gold Corporation and NOVAGOLD Resources, both based in Canada.

Balanced Boundaries
Gifts of De-Escalation typographic title
Ending perpetual
states of urgency
in corporate
spaces
By Woodrie Burich
R

ecently, I was reflecting on one of my favorite mentors. She was a rockstar consultant with a brilliant mind and excellent communication skills. She was consistently thrown into challenging and high-conflict situations because of her track record for figuring out the core issue and her ability to bring frustrated people back to the table to resolve it. If you needed something done, throw Jane* at it. She was the ultimate fixer.

She taught me a skill early in my career that I’ve never forgotten: she was an expert at classifying the urgent from the non-urgent.

I remember in my early twenties, rushing down a long hallway to gain her attention. I was so focused on getting her advice that I often would track her down and take the few minutes she had between meetings to walk hallways with her. In this particular moment, she stopped. Paused. Took a breath. And then stated something to me very gently and very calmly: “This is not urgent. We are not curing cancer. No one is dying in this moment. Remember that. Now, what exactly do you need?”

Inside Alaska Business
Residential Mortgage
Anchorage-based real estate firm Residential Mortgage is extending its reach into Arizona and Colorado. The company hired loan originators Ron and Brooke Schlachter in Phoenix and Sheila Kennelley in Denver. The two new branches add to the eleven throughout Alaska for the Northrim Bank subsidiary.
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Aleutian Airways
A new regional airline expands travel options for Unalaska. Aleutian Airways began service in November with two flights each weekday from Anchorage to Dutch Harbor and back. The new competitor cuts the fare for a one-way ticket from $1,000 to $659, while round-trip tickets cost just under $1,000, comparable to Ravn Alaska’s service to Unalaska.
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Economic Indicators

ANS Crude Oil Production
499,140 barrels
1.1% change from previous month

11/29/2022
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources

ANS West Coast Crude Oil Prices
$89.63 per barrel
-3.6% change from previous month
11/30/2022
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources
Statewide Employment
360,600 labor force
4.5% Unemployment

10/1/2022. Adjusted seasonally.
Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Right Moves
LifeMed Alaska
Headshot of Grace K Greene
Greene
A veteran of the US Marine Corps is the new CEO of LifeMed Alaska. The air and ground ambulance service selected Grace K. Greene to lead the company. Greene was the president of TOTE Maritime Alaska until last year, when she moved to Oak Brook, Illinois to take a job as senior vice president of Hub Group. Greene attended the US Naval Academy and was commissioned into the Marine Corps, working in logistics and aviation safety.
Natives of Kodiak
A Headshot of Monica James
James
The Alaska Native urban corporation for Kodiak selected a successor to longtime President and CEO Jim Erickson, who is retiring. Natives of Kodiak hired Monica James, most recently the chief operating officer at Aleut Corporation. James is a shareholder of Calista Corporation and Bethel Native Corporation. James was previously executive vice president and COO at Calista and also served as president of Yulista Holding, the Alabama-based aerospace branch of Calista. James also served as vice president of business operations and administration for Alaska Aerospace, the state-backed owner and operator of the Pacific Spaceport Complex on Kodiak Island.

Alaska Trends

P

erhaps the most discouraging statistic in the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s cost of living publication is the Affordability Index. That measures how many monthly paychecks it takes to afford a 30-year mortgage on a typical house. In most places, the number of paychecks is more than one, which strikes a blow to the traditional vision of a single-earner household.

The encouraging part of that statistic, though, is that there is at least one place where the single-earner household can exist: in Fairbanks, the Affordability Index is less than one paycheck per household.

At 4.9 percent, price increases in 2021 in Alaska were the highest since 1990, and they only ballooned going into 2022. While inflation retreated as the year progressed, 2022 is liable to end up with double-digit increases. Still, state economist Neal Fried likes to point out that Alaska had annual inflation above 5 percent from 1974 to 1982, yet those were Alaska’s boom years, albeit for once-in-a-lifetime reasons. His point is that high inflation doesn’t have to spell economic doom.

This edition of Alaska Trends checks the cost of living across Alaska and over time.

What book is currently on your nightstand?
Shadows on the Koyukuk: An Alaskan Native’s Life Along the River by Sidney Huntington and How to Be Your Dog’s Best Friend by the Monks of New Skete.

What vacation spot is on your bucket list?
Iceland.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
We had a black wolf that hung out at Mendenhall Glacier for a number of years and got a chance to ski with it, which was really amazing.

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work?
Walk the dog. Feed the dog.

What charity or cause are you passionate about?
SEADOGS (Southeast Alaska Dogs Organized for Ground Search).

Geoff and Marcy Larson with their dog Tango in a grassy opening
What book is currently on your nightstand?
Shadows on the Koyukuk: An Alaskan Native’s Life Along the River by Sidney Huntington and How to Be Your Dog’s Best Friend by the Monks of New Skete.

What vacation spot is on your bucket list?
Iceland.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
We had a black wolf that hung out at Mendenhall Glacier for a number of years and got a chance to ski with it, which was really amazing.

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work?
Walk the dog. Feed the dog.

What charity or cause are you passionate about?
SEADOGS (Southeast Alaska Dogs Organized for Ground Search).

Carter Damaska | Alaska Business

Off the Cuff

Geoff and Marcy Larson
O

n a weekly basis, the co-founders of Alaskan Brewing Company tromp into the muskeg on Douglas Island with their dog, Tango, to hone the retriever’s trailing skills. A SEADOGS volunteer hides in the brush, and Tango sniffs them out. The exercise keeps Geoff and Marcy Larson and their pooch ready for when Alaska State Troopers call for help to locate a missing person.

“It’s sometimes a very traumatic period for a small community,” Geoff says, “but it’s amazing to see how small communities pull together.”

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The largest and most diverse equipment fleet across Alaska. text
Anchorage
907.522.6466

The Rental Zone
907.474.2000

Delta Junction
907.895.9898

Fairbanks
907.456.2000

Prudhoe Bay
907.659.2000

Kenai
907.335.5466

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Thank You Alaska!

Thank you to our friends, neighbors, and valued customers for your ongoing support and partnership, and special thanks to each of our dedicated employees for their continued care, expertise, and ingenuity as we all work together to keep Alaska moving. We look forward to continuing to serve our communities by providing multi-modal transportation and logistics solutions across the entire state!

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Thanks for reading our January 2023 issue!