The Evolution of a Pipeline text
Jeff Baker
Senior Vice President,
Michael Baker International
MAT MOLLENKOPF,
Senior Pipeline Engineer

MIREYA DE LA PENA,
Pipeline Project Manager

JOSH GREENHILL,
Senior Pipeline Engineer

August 2021
August 2021 | Volume 37 | Number 8 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Online and In-Check

Third-party cybersecurity providers keep Alaska businesses vigilant
By Tracy Barbour

Tools of the Trade

High-tech solutions for the construction industry
By Alexandra Kay

The Law of the Land

Environmental law firms ensure clients remain on solid legal ground
By Vanessa Orr

Staying on Track

Alaska to Alberta railway considers refinancing to steam ahead
By Vanessa Orr

Long Forgotten—Far From Gone

USACE scrubs away at $1 billion of environmental liability
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
AOGA
Environmental: Long Forgotten—Far From Gone

New Administration, New Agenda

Mixed messaging from Biden Administration spells uncertainty for oil and gas investment
By Linda F. Hersey
AOGA

About The Cover

Without pipelines, where would Alaska be?

While most are aware of the crucial importance of these highly specialized pieces of infrastructure, there’s a lot more going on beneath the surface.

Michael Baker International’s pipelines have been coursing through the state since the construction of TAPS. And gracing this month’s cover of Alaska Business are a few of the pipeline problem solvers behind the company. Having been in the biz for decades, they’ve learned a thing or two about transporting pressurized fluids in Alaska. For example, did you know these structures have been gradually elevated over the years to accommodate animal movements—and on the North Slope pipelines get a good shake from wind instead of earthquakes?

Our cover story, Pipelines: Evolutions and Solutions, is brimming with expert insights on decades of projects from a team of industrial support service pros.

Cover Photo by Oscar Avellaneda-Cruz

New Administration, New Agenda

Mixed messaging from Biden Administration spells uncertainty for oil and gas investment
By Linda F. Hersey
AOGA
Oil & Gas: New Administration, New Agenda

Online and In-Check

Third-party cybersecurity providers keep Alaska businesses vigilant
By Tracy Barbour

Tools of the Trade

High-tech solutions for the construction industry
By Alexandra Kay

The Law of the Land

Environmental law firms ensure clients remain on solid legal ground
By Vanessa Orr

Staying on Track

Alaska to Alberta railway considers refinancing to steam ahead
By Vanessa Orr

Long Forgotten—Far From Gone

USACE scrubs away at $1 billion of environmental liability
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
AOGA
Environmental: Long Forgotten—Far From Gone

About The Cover

Without pipelines, where would Alaska be?

While most are aware of the crucial importance of these highly specialized pieces of infrastructure, there’s a lot more going on beneath the surface.

Michael Baker International’s pipelines have been coursing through the state since the construction of TAPS. And gracing this month’s cover of Alaska Business are a few of the pipeline problem solvers behind the company. Having been in the biz for decades, they’ve learned a thing or two about transporting pressurized fluids in Alaska. For example, did you know these structures have been gradually elevated over the years to accommodate animal movements—and on the North Slope pipelines get a good shake from wind instead of earthquakes?

Our cover story, Pipelines: Evolutions and Solutions, is brimming with expert insights on decades of projects from a team of industrial support service pros.

Cover Photo by Oscar Avellaneda-Cruz

Special Section: Industrial Support Services
Geospatial data provides vital insight for industry
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Agencies offer HR departments an able ally
By Amy Newman
A little design goes a long way
By Danny Kreilkamp
Maintenance: Key to Production
Proper rig care spells less down time for oil producers
By Rindi White
Sonny Kula | Elko International
We know what comes out, but what goes into a pipeline?
By Tasha Anderson
stanley45 | iStock
We know what comes out, but what goes into a pipeline?
By Tasha Anderson
stanley45 | iStock
Pipelines: Evolutions AND Solutions
Geospatial data provides vital insight for industry
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Agencies offer HR departments an able ally
By Amy Newman
A little design goes a long way
By Danny Kreilkamp
Maintenance: Key to Production
Proper rig care spells less down time for oil producers
By Rindi White
Sonny Kula | Elko International
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc. 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373. © 2021 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & October issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.
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From the Editor

Little Parts and Big Players
It’s a few days past the summer solstice as I sit to write this. And the days don’t just feel long, they feel endless: a permanent twilight that—as a life-long Alaskan—I’ve learned to cherish. But not all things that linger are as welcome. The ongoing effects of a global pandemic come to mind, as does the unfortunately familiar trial of a challenged economy.

But although as a community we still feel the weight of COVID-19 and several years of a state-wide recession, there are little victories we can celebrate even now: there was a tourism season, even if it’s not quite back to its former glory; stores and restaurants are filling up (I’ve never been so grateful to wait forty-five minutes for a table at South); and here at Alaska Business we are once again conducting face-to-face interviews with our sources and attending events in person.

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Volume 37, #8
Editorial Staff
Acting Managing Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2910 [email protected]
Staff Writer
Danny Kreilkamp
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Editorial Assistant
Emily Olsen
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Art Director
Monica Sterchi-Lowman
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Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 [email protected]
Photo Contributor
Kerry Tasker
BUSINESS STAFF
President
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VP & General Manager
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VP Sales & Marketing
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257-2909 [email protected]
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Advertising Account Manager
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257-2911 [email protected]
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TELECOM & TECH
Online and In-Check
Third-party cybersecurity providers keep Alaska businesses vigilant
By Tracy Barbour
F

rom its inception, Anchorage-based DenaliTEK has focused on addressing cybersecurity issues and a range of other IT services. But for years, many businesses did not want to hear about cybersecurity, including medical practices that are legally required to maintain strict security practices, says President Todd Clark. Now due to a rash of security breaches and evolving federal laws, more companies are ready to listen.

“Now people understand that it’s a real, urgent business need—and in some cases a problem,” Clark says. “And they want to know their IT provider is prioritizing cybersecurity.”

Cybersecurity is such a critical issue that it’s now part of DenaliTEK’s official mission statement: “Alaska will be the most cybersecure business community in America.”

yacobchuk | iStock
TELECOM & TECH
someone using a control panel
yacobchuk | iStock
Online and In-Check
Third-party cybersecurity providers keep Alaska businesses vigilant
By Tracy Barbour
F

rom its inception, Anchorage-based DenaliTEK has focused on addressing cybersecurity issues and a range of other IT services. But for years, many businesses did not want to hear about cybersecurity, including medical practices that are legally required to maintain strict security practices, says President Todd Clark. Now due to a rash of security breaches and evolving federal laws, more companies are ready to listen.

“Now people understand that it’s a real, urgent business need—and in some cases a problem,” Clark says. “And they want to know their IT provider is prioritizing cybersecurity.”

Cybersecurity is such a critical issue that it’s now part of DenaliTEK’s official mission statement: “Alaska will be the most cybersecure business community in America.”

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Construction
Tools of
the Trade
High-tech solutions for the construction industry
By Alexandra Kay
Natnan Srisuwan | iStock
C

ontractors in the construction industry are driven to keep projects on track, on time, and within budget. And lately there have been additional challenges for the construction industry, including labor shortages, heightened HSE requirements, and the rising cost of lumber.

“Alaska challenges are like any other state, but bigger,” says Nelson Hays, a construction technology engineer with Accupoint, which specializes in construction technology solutions. “The short construction season and challenges of remote work demand innovation to deploy and operate a system with minimal downtime.”

Technologies and techniques have been (and continue to be) developed to streamline processes and procedures, improve communication, build efficiencies, and reduce or mitigate challenges that a construction project may face. Below Accupoint, PDC Engineers, Drake Construction, NANA Construction, Cornerstone General Contractors, and Remote Alaska Solutions share some of their insights and solutions for Alaska’s construction industry.

Building Information Modeling
Building Information Modeling (BIM) is the process of creating and managing a digital representation of a project. It can be used for scheduling, decision making, cost estimation, and operations maintenance and sustainability. BIM allows engineers, architects, contractors, and other construction professionals to collaborate on a 3D model of a project. With BIM, when one aspect of a design is changed, the software updates to reflect that change—so everyone involved with the project is in the know. According to the Ernst & Young report Construction Technology Trends to Watch, the estimated savings of project cost using BIM is typically between 4 to 6 percent. And according to a Dodge Data & Analytics report, 73 percent of US contractors are using it.
Construction
Tools of
the Trade
High-tech solutions for the construction industry
By Alexandra Kay
Natnan Srisuwan | iStock
C

ontractors in the construction industry are driven to keep projects on track, on time, and within budget. And lately there have been additional challenges for the construction industry, including labor shortages, heightened HSE requirements, and the rising cost of lumber.

“Alaska challenges are like any other state, but bigger,” says Nelson Hays, a construction technology engineer with Accupoint, which specializes in construction technology solutions. “The short construction season and challenges of remote work demand innovation to deploy and operate a system with minimal downtime.”

Technologies and techniques have been (and continue to be) developed to streamline processes and procedures, improve communication, build efficiencies, and reduce or mitigate challenges that a construction project may face. Below Accupoint, PDC Engineers, Drake Construction, NANA Construction, Cornerstone General Contractors, and Remote Alaska Solutions share some of their insights and solutions for Alaska’s construction industry.

Building Information Modeling
Building Information Modeling (BIM) is the process of creating and managing a digital representation of a project. It can be used for scheduling, decision making, cost estimation, and operations maintenance and sustainability. BIM allows engineers, architects, contractors, and other construction professionals to collaborate on a 3D model of a project. With BIM, when one aspect of a design is changed, the software updates to reflect that change—so everyone involved with the project is in the know. According to the Ernst & Young report Construction Technology Trends to Watch, the estimated savings of project cost using BIM is typically between 4 to 6 percent. And according to a Dodge Data & Analytics report, 73 percent of US contractors are using it.
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SAVVY EXPERIENCE ACROSS THE UNITED STATES, CANADA, EUROPE AND ASIA
Over 550 lawyers from Dorsey & Whitney’s 19 offices provide clients global reach, local resources and productive relationships. All with a deep understanding of our clients’ business, industry and the goals that drive them. Making us a wise choice for smart businesses everywhere.
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Leading environment, natural resources & regulated industries practice box
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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
The Law of the Land
Environmental law firms ensure clients remain on solid legal ground
By Vanessa Orr
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E

nvironmental law is a vast field, especially in Alaska where so many different factors come into play. From protecting endangered species to developing natural resources in a safe and efficient way and making sure that landowners—including Alaska Native entities—are involved in decisions that affect their way of life, companies working in the Last Frontier must make sure that they’re on solid legal ground.

For this reason, many companies choose to hire firms that specialize in environmental law to work in conjunction with, or in addition to, in-house counsel.

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Industrial Support Services Special Section
stanley45 | iStock
Pipelines: Evolutions and Solutions
We know what comes out, but what goes into a pipeline?
By Tasha Anderson
A

few years ago a friend and I were on a road trip exploring Alaska, somewhere in the vicinity of the Denali Highway. At some point we saw a side road, pulled onto it, got out to walk for a while, and stumbled across one of the locations where the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) transitions from above to below ground.

As we walked next to the pipeline, taking a moment to appreciate our first encounter with an iconic piece of infrastructure, I wondered why it would be buried there, in that particular place. To my untrained eye, there weren’t any immediate answers.

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Industrial Support Services Special Section
The Gist of GIS
Geospatial data provides vital insight for industry
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
F

rom checking on an Amazon package to firing up the Garmin to head out to a favorite bend of a remote stream, geospatial data provides layers of information vital to people’s everyday lives and the industries that employ them.

Given its role in the world, it should come as little surprise that geographic information systems (GIS) is one of the five fastest growing technologies in the public sector.

“The reason that it’s growing so fast right now is because it’s embedded in our daily business operations,” says Alaska’s State Geospatial Information Officer Leslie Jones. “We use the tools to automate workflows, to increase efficiency, and improve our communication. But, most importantly, we use it to make data informed decisions.”

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Based in Fairbanks, Hoffman Consulting provides emergency planning and preparedness services for businesses and organizations throughout Alaska and the Pacific Northwest.
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ailure to recognize an approaching threat can be a real bear… At Hoffman Consulting, we firmly believe that the time to prepare for emergencies is before they appear on the horizon, not when you find yourself suddenly confronting a crisis.

With over 30 years’ experience in public and private-sector emergency response, risk assessment/mitigation, and crisis management communications, we can develop the site-specific response plans and resource guides necessary to face any challenge.

We are the Pipefitters & Welders of the United Association typogrphy
Building Alaska's Arctic Pipelines for Over 40 Years in a red sidebar
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INDUSTRIAL SUPPORT SERVICES SPECIAL SECTION
Coeur Alaska
Recruiting Rugged Workforces
Agencies offer HR departments an able ally
By Amy Newman
A

laska’s resource development industry offers some of the state’s most lucrative jobs. But the trade-off for those hefty paychecks is logging time in some of the state’s most rugged locations and harshest climates, working long hours isolated from family for extended periods of time.

So the ability to recruit and retain a reliable, skilled workforce that can handle the technical, environmental, and even mental aspects of these jobs is a crucial component of a project’s success.

Most large companies have an equally large human resources (HR) department capable of overseeing the hiring process. Coeur Alaska, which operates the Kensington gold mine outside of Juneau, for example, typically handles hiring for both salaried and hourly positions, says Chrissi Gilbert, HR manager for Coeur Alaska.

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NV5 Geospatial Is Helping to Solve Alaska’s Toughest Geographic Challenges
Conducting environmentally responsible and sustainable projects that help us adapt to a changing landscape and climate
A

lthough many Alaskans may not recognize its new name, NV5 Geospatial has been providing geospatial services in the state for over 60 years. Most recently known as Quantum Spatial, the company has been entrenched at its Merrill Field location in Anchorage for decades. It has supported Alaska on many of its major mapping initiatives such as aerial surveys for the U.S. government, and mapping route alternatives before construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. NV5 Geospatial has been with Alaska through many of its changes and continues to adapt to solve new challenges.

Today, “mapping” means so much more than taking pictures from above and drawing features of the ground. With an arsenal of advanced sensor technologies such as lasers, multi-spectral imaging cameras, and massive computing power, modern geospatial companies can expand the catalog of questions that can be answered with geospatial solutions. From measuring the changing coastline, to identifying specific geo-hazards along pipe, rail, and road systems, to developing impact studies of earthquakes, and analyzing potential landslide hazards, NV5 Geospatial is answering some of the most pressing geographic questions facing Alaska.

The 2021 Top 49ers
Alaska’s Largest Locally-owned Businesses Ranked by Gross Revenue
By Charles Bell, VP of Sales
T

he October issue of Alaska Business magazine features the annual Top 49ers, ranking Alaska’s top locally-owned businesses based on gross revenue. Last year, the companies comprising the Top 49ers reported combined revenue of nearly $18.5 billion which was a 7.24% increase over the prior year.

In addition to generating billions of dollars in annual revenue, these businesses employ a reported 21,794 people in Alaska and 80,034 worldwide. With numbers like this, it’s safe to say that these forty-nine locally-owned businesses are signifi cant contributors to keeping Alaska’s economy strong.

Growing with Alaska. text

Span Alaska’s new Anchorage Service Center (ASC) means even better service and more options for our customers statewide.

Our new facility increases our capacity, improves our security, offers customizable storage areas, and streamlines freight handling — all to enable faster, smoother, and more consistent delivery of your cargo to its final destination.

Stop by our new ASC and see what Span Alaska can do for you.

Or, to schedule a pickup or find the terminal nearest you, call 1-800-257-7726 or visit us at spanalaska.com.

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Growing with Alaska. text

Span Alaska’s new Anchorage Service Center (ASC) means even better service and more options for our customers statewide.

Our new facility increases our capacity, improves our security, offers customizable storage areas, and streamlines freight handling — all to enable faster, smoother, and more consistent delivery of your cargo to its final destination.

Stop by our new ASC and see what Span Alaska can do for you.

Or, to schedule a pickup or find the terminal nearest you, call 1-800-257-7726 or visit us at spanalaska.com.

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INDUSTRIAL SUPPORT SERVICES SPECIAL SECTION
Sonny Kula | Elko International
Maintenance: Key to Production
Proper rig care spells less down time for oil producers
By Rindi White
F

rom spearing new prehistoric pools of crude oil to reworking a field to extract oil deposits previously untapped, drilling rigs are the machines that power the oil and gas industry. But, like any machine, they require significant maintenance and care to keep operating at maximum efficiency.

That’s one goal, says Luke Lawrence, wells manager for ConocoPhillips Alaska. And it’s an important one.

“For us, time is money. If the rig is efficient and is able to operate during the time we’ve planned it to operate, that’s better business for us. We do a lot of auditing and checking on how [rig owners] go about their maintenance processes. In our evaluation of a competitive tender, that’s part of what we look at,” Lawrence says.

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turning the page
Industrial Support Services Special Section
The Beauty of
Public Projects
A little design goes
a long way
By Danny Kreilkamp
P

erched in the northeast corner of Anchorage lies a curious piece of infrastructure that serves as a gateway to the City of Lights and Flowers.

Approaching from the north and south, drivers pass under a pair of bridges etched with detailed scales resembling those of a fish. When they aren’t questioning what brought them to the wrong side of the road, crossers east and west might take note of a crimson fence or tasteful landscape elements.

This gateway is the Glenn Highway/Muldoon Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI): the only of its kind in the state.

Industrial Support Services Special Section
Industrial Support
Services Directory
ADVOCACY, PERSONNEL, TRAINING & FACILITIES
Alaska Executive Search
Paula Bradison, Pres.
821 N St., Ste. 201
Anchorage, AK 99501
akexec.com
907-276-5707
Providing recruitment and staffing in and outside of Alaska since 1977. With highly trained recruiters, certified by the American Staffing Association, we offer specialty recruitment services in most all disciplines.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1977/1977 | 50-100/50-100
Alaska Miners Association
Deantha Skibinski, Exec. Dir.
121 W. Fireweed Ln., Ste. 120
Anchorage, AK 99503
alaskaminers.org
907-563-9229
Nonprofit industry support organization for the mining industry.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1939/1939 | 3/3
Alaska Oil and Gas Association
Kara Moriarty, Pres./CEO
121 W. Fireweed Ln., #207
Anchorage, AK 99503
aoga.org
907-272-1481
Alaska oil and gas industry trade association.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1966/1966 | 4/4
The world is changing… and so is Alaska.
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Connecting Alaska for over 40 years
Integrated electrical, telecommunications, construction, and engineering solutions
Connecting Alaska for over 40 years
Integrated electrical, telecommunications, construction, and engineering solutions
The world is changing… and so is Alaska.
Are you ready?
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Connecting Alaska for over 40 years
Integrated electrical, telecommunications, construction, and engineering solutions
TRANSPORTATION
Alaska map
Staying on Track
Alaska to Alberta railway considers refinancing to steam ahead
By Vanessa Orr
T

he Alaska Railroad, Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, World War II military infrastructure, and TAPS: there are a select number of large-scale infrastructure projects that have helped make Alaska what it is today.

It was hoped that the Alaska to Alberta Railway (A2A) would be a similar groundbreaking project, connecting producers and consumers in western Canada with the large and growing markets in East and South Asia.

“There are certain types of beachhead investments that create a lot of other jobs and contribute to increased economic activity in the state,” says A2A Vice-chair Mead Treadwell of these move-the-needle projects. “And while our ports are fundamental, in this case, the A2A could help Alaska find its destiny as a transportation powerhouse.”

Oil & Gas
New Administration, New Agenda
Mixed messaging from Biden Administration spells uncertainty for oil and gas investment
By Linda F. Hersey
AOGA
P

resident Joe Biden sent a clear message early this summer about his position on oil and gas development in Alaska.

The president set parameters for future energy development in Alaska, in what at first appeared to be contradictory back-to-back actions on exploration and drilling. Upon closer look, the pair of decisions underscored the president’s recognition that the US economy depends on fossil fuels in its energy portfolio.

Biden signaled that Alaska oil and gas development will continue in areas long used for that purpose.

The back-to-back decisions illustrate the balancing act faced by the Biden administration as it proceeds on a campaign promise to move the nation toward less dependence on fossil fuels for renewable energy sources.

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Cut the Distance
Cut the Cost
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Marine Repair & Maintenance
Closer to Home,
More Cost-Effective,
Competitive Rates,
at one of the Best Equipped
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JAG Alaska Inc., Seward Shipyard
+1.907.224.3198
[email protected]m
Environmental
Long Forgotten—Far From Gone
USACE scrubs away at $1 billion of environmental liability
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
W

ith an estimated billion dollars of remediation projects left to manage in Alaska alone, it’s a long road for the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District to clean up formerly used defense sites in the state. Nonetheless, the USACE–Alaska District has been steadily chipping away at the herculean effort since October 17, 1986, whittling the list of properties that need to be investigated for possible remediation from 137 to 60.

“We’re working on almost forty to forty-five of those actively,” says Ken Andraschko, the USACE–Alaska District’s Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program manager.

K. Eldridge | USACE Alaska District
W

ith an estimated billion dollars of remediation projects left to manage in Alaska alone, it’s a long road for the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District to clean up formerly used defense sites in the state. Nonetheless, the USACE–Alaska District has been steadily chipping away at the herculean effort since October 17, 1986, whittling the list of properties that need to be investigated for possible remediation from 137 to 60.

“We’re working on almost forty to forty-five of those actively,” says Ken Andraschko, the USACE–Alaska District’s Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program manager.

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Inside Alaska Business
Koniag | TecPro
Koniag is excited to welcome TecPro to its Energy and Water business sector. Based in Anchorage, TecPro is a well-established industrial electrical and security services provider whose clients and projects span Alaska, the Lower 48, and Hawai’i. Koniag Chairman and CEO Ron Unger says, “TecPro has an experienced, knowledgeable staff and has a history of winning valuable contracts in Alaska and across the Pacific Northwest. With TecPro’s addition to the Koniag family, we can continue to grow and diversify in pursuit of our mission—continually increasing benefits and opportunities for our Shareholders.” TecPro will join Dowland-Bach, Glacier Services, Big G Electric & Engineering, and newly acquired Great Northern Engineering in Koniag’s Energy and Water sector.
koniag.com
Trihydro | JJ&A
Trihydro Corporation has completed the acquisition of California-based consulting firm Jacobson James & Associates (JJ&A). The acquisition diversifies and broadens Trihydro’s market presence and enhances the firm’s ability to better serve its West Coast and national client base with expanded resources and expertise. With similar solutions-focused cultures, both companies are committed to serving as trusted advisors when partnering with clients on projects. In addition to enhancing Trihydro’s core service areas of complex environmental clean-up, stormwater, hazardous materials management, and natural resource permitting, JJ&A strengthens Trihydro’s regulatory planning and strategy services and adds new areas of expertise to the team, such as forest resiliency planning, biomass management, and post-fire stabilization and restoration.
trihydro.com | jacobsonjames.com
Economic Indicators
ANS Crude Oil Production
475,860 barrels
-1% change from previous month

6/30/21

Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources

ANS West Coast Crude Oil Prices
$76.53 per barrel
8% change from previous month

7/1/21

Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources

Statewide Employment
350,818 Labor Force
6.7% Unemployment

5/1/21. Adjusted seasonally.

Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Right Moves
RISQ Consulting
Colby Swenor headshot
Swenor
RISQ Consulting announced Colby Swenor has joined its team as a Strategy Consultant. Swenor works with both current and prospective clients, providing them with customized and comprehensive insurance programs to ensure that their risks are successfully managed. He joins RISQ following a successful fifteen-year career in the financial services industry and has held management positions with Wells Fargo and Key Bank, as well as a commercial loan officer position at Alaska USA Federal Credit Union. Prior to joining RISQ he was the CFO for a large Anchorage-based contracting company.
Northrim Bank
Northrim Bank announced two new officers and a promotion: Jeffrey Sanford, VP – Loan Officer, Kodiak Loan Production Office; Asanya Lloyd, Assistant Branch Manager, Jewel Lake Branch; and Michelle Lozano, Special Credits Associate Officer.

Alaska Trends

S

ummer might be on its way out, but Alaskans can take solace in the fact that a different kind of fun is on its way in.

Perhaps second only to fishing (depending on who you ask), the Last Frontier’s hunting scene attracts outdoor enthusiasts from around the world. Serving these enthusiasts are a number of local guides and other hunting industry professionals to ensure a safe and unforgettable experience. Per a report by the McDowell group prepared for the Alaska Professional Hunters Association, the guided hunting industry employed 1,380 direct jobs and contributed $62.4 million in total state revenue.

This month’s installment of Alaska Trends charges headfirst into some other impressive numbers that underline this storied industry. Not just big game—Alaska’s hunting industry means big money for the state and its recreationally spoiled residents.

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?

The only thing on my nightstand is dust. That said, currently in the queue is a book called Thug Kitchen.

What charity or cause are you passionate about?

Both my wife and I are big supporters of public radio and public television.

What vacation spot is on your bucket list?

That’s in the crosshairs right now, but I really want to do one of those longer rafting trips through the Colorado River on the Grand Canyon.

Bill O’Leary Standing behind a desk

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?

The only thing on my nightstand is dust. That said, currently in the queue is a book called Thug Kitchen.

What charity or cause are you passionate about?

Both my wife and I are big supporters of public radio and public television.

What vacation spot is on your bucket list?

That’s in the crosshairs right now, but I really want to do one of those longer rafting trips through the Colorado River on the Grand Canyon.

Images ©Kerry Tasker

Off the Cuff

Bill O’Leary
B

ill O’Leary is the President & CEO of the Alaska Railroad. The Fairbanks native has led the company at every level, from COO to CFO, eventually “ascending to the throne” back in 2013. O’Leary’s leadership is rivaled only by his sense of humor—something that likely helped him through the brutal tourism season of 2020.

Despite seeing passenger levels decline a whopping 95 percent from the previous year, the new season has O’Leary optimistic.

“We’re coming back,” he says. “We’ve had strong bookings and a lot of it has really come in the last six weeks. Had you told me that in January, I would have said: ‘Not happening.’” At the time of the interview, the Alaska Railroad’s passenger season was set to kick off at the end of May, and O’Leary is looking forward to what’s in store for 2021.

John Deere and Airport Equipment Rentals logos
Alaska State Map
John Deere
460E Mud Truck
Featuring:
– Traction Boosting Auto Diff Locks
– Jobsite Adaptive Suspension
– Smooth, Optimized, Fast Cycle Shifting

Backed by a Industry Leading
5-Year / 15,000 Hour Transmission Warranty

John Deere and Airport Equipment Rentals logos
Alaska State Map
John Deere
460E Mud Truck
Featuring:
– Traction Boosting Auto Diff Locks
– Jobsite Adaptive Suspension
– Smooth, Optimized, Fast Cycle Shifting

Backed by a Industry Leading
5-Year / 15,000 Hour Transmission Warranty

Prudhoe Bay
907.659.2000
Fairbanks
907.456.2000
Anchorage
907.522.6466
The Rental Zone
907.474.2000
Delta Junction
907.895.9898
Kenai
907.335.5466
Prudhoe Bay
907.659.2000

Fairbanks
907.456.2000

Anchorage
907.522.6466

The Rental Zone
907.474.2000

Delta Junction
907.895.9898

Kenai
907.335.5466

Only pay for the speed you need…
Dynamic Routing!
Lynden Logo
On time and on budget.
At Lynden, we understand that plans change but deadlines don’t. That’s why we proudly offer our exclusive Dynamic Routing system. Designed to work around your unique requirements, Dynamic Routing allows you to choose the mode of transportation – air, sea or land – to control the speed of your deliveries so they arrive just as they are needed. With Lynden you only pay for the speed you need.
lynden.com | 1-888-596-3361
On time and on budget.
At Lynden, we understand that plans change but deadlines don’t. That’s why we proudly offer our exclusive Dynamic Routing system. Designed to work around your unique requirements, Dynamic Routing allows you to choose the mode of transportation – air, sea or land – to control the speed of your deliveries so they arrive just as they are needed. With Lynden you only pay for the speed you need.
lynden.com | 1-888-596-3361
Lynden Logo
Alaska Business Logo
Thanks for reading our August 2021 issue!