september 2019 | Volume 35 | Number 9 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Emergent Technologies

Tech security tips to keep your business safe
By Tracy Barbourr

The Shoppes at Sun Mountain

Wasilla grows with first Sonic, a Planet Fitness, retail, residential options
By Sam Friedman

A Small Business Success Story

Multi-generational family lodge and winery flourishes in Kachemak Bay
By McKibben Jackinsky

Movers and Drillers in Cook Inlet

Hilcorp dominates, BlueCrest innovates
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Upgrades, New Construction to Improve Alaska’s Healthcare Access

Multiple projects moving forward while budget uncertainty put others on hold
By Vanessa Orr
Travel Like a Local

Travel Like a Local

How businesses are making Alaska a year-round destination
By Vanessa Orr
UnCruise Adventures

Out of the Mine and into the Smelter

Alaska’s metal mines export commodities to import good jobs and a strong economy
By Brad Joyal
alamy
Out of the Mine and into the Smelter

Out of the Mine and into the Smelter

Alaska’s metal mines export commodities to import good jobs and a strong economy
By Brad Joyal
alamy

Emergent Technologies

Tech security tips to keep your business safe
By Tracy Barbourr

The Shoppes at Sun Mountain

Wasilla grows with first Sonic, a Planet Fitness, retail, residential options
By Sam Friedman

A Small Business Success Story

Multi-generational family lodge and winery flourishes in Kachemak Bay
By McKibben Jackinsky

Movers and Drillers in Cook Inlet

Hilcorp dominates, BlueCrest innovates
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Upgrades, New Construction to Improve Alaska’s Healthcare Access

Multiple projects moving forward while budget uncertainty put others on hold
By Vanessa Orr
Travel Like a Local

Travel Like a Local

How businesses are making Alaska a year-round destination
By Vanessa Orr
UnCruise Adventures

Alaska Native Special Section

Bering Straits Native Corporation: defined by conscientious leaders and cultural values
By Tasha Anderson
Strong Vision and Steady Growth
Bering Straits Native Corporation: defined by conscientious leaders and cultural values
By Tasha Anderson
Protecting culture, traditions, and lands while operating successful businesses
By Kathryn Mackenzie
$370 million in credits registered in Alaska since 2015
By Sam Friedman
Chugach
Protecting culture, traditions, and lands while operating successful businesses
By Kathryn Mackenzie
Harvesting Carbon Credits
$370 million in credits registered in Alaska since 2015
By Sam Friedman
Chugach

About The Cover

Gail Schubert, president and CEO of Bering Straits Native Corporation, expertly combines her cultural values, education, and work experience as she dedicates herself to her corporation, the Bering Straits region, and her people. She is passionate about creating opportunities for shareholders, descendants, and all Alaska Natives, whether that’s in the region, Alaska’s urban areas, or around the world. Schubert draws from her upbringing in Unalakleet as well as her eight years of experience working in New York on Wall Street to balance traditional knowledge with modern approaches to business as she forges a path that embraces the past while preparing for the future.
Volume 35, #9
Published by Alaska Business
Publishing Co. Anchorage, Alaska
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 [email protected]
Associate/Web Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2906 [email protected]
Art Director
Monica Sterchi-Lowman
257-2916 [email protected]
Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 pr[email protected]
Photo Contributor
Judy Patrick
BUSINESS STAFF
President
Billie Martin
VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 [email protected]
VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 [email protected]
Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 [email protected]
Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 [email protected]
Accounting Manager
Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 [email protected]
Customer Service Representative
Emily Olsen
257-2914 [email protected]
501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100 Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577
Toll Free: 1-800-770-4373
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ALASKA BUSINESS PUBLISHING CO., INC.
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc., 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373; © 2019 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & October issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.

From the Editor

Celebrating Alaska Native Operations
R

ecently we sent out a readership survey to help us better understand what you love to read in Alaska Business. We’re learning so much about your interests and the areas you’d like to see us cover more (small businesses and entrepreneurship, for example). We are heartened to learn that the great majority of you read the magazine from cover to cover every month. Thank you for your continuing support and your valuable input—we take every idea you give us seriously and are thrilled to have the opportunity to even better tailor each article to the topics that are relevant to you and the regions you’d like to see show up in the magazine more often (we hear you Southcentral). If you haven’t taken the survey yet, please do! Just visit akbizmag.com and follow the link.

One subject you’ve told us you love reading about is Alaska Native business activities, which is particularly exciting since this is the month in which we celebrate all things Alaska Native. This year we asked each of the twelve Alaska Native regional corporations a few questions about their respective business activities including their favorite programs of 2019, what initiatives their shareholders are telling them they’re excited about, and how each of their regions is unique in how it allows them to search out economic opportunities. We’re thankful to those executives who provided us with thoughtful answers for this extensive article.

This year we made a very exciting change to our Alaska Native directories by surveying not only the twelve regional corporations, but all the village corporations for which we have contact information. This change not only allows us to present you with a bigger, better, more comprehensive directory, but also gives us the opportunity to touch base with some of the smaller operations we don’t get to hear from as often.

Kathryn Mackenzie

Kathryn Mackenzie
Managing Editor, Alaska Business

Telecom & Tech
Emergent
Technologies
Tech security tips to keep your business safe
By Tracy Barbour
N

ew and evolving technology—from virtual private networks to artificial intelligence—offers diverse benefits that businesses can use to enhance their operations. But new technology also comes with inherent vulnerabilities that can jeopardize a company’s infrastructure, reputation, and other assets. However, by employing best practices and remaining vigilant, businesses can protect themselves as they evolve right along with exciting new technological applications.

Telecom & Tech
Emergent
Technologies
Tech security tips to keep your business safe
By Tracy Barbour
N

ew and evolving technology—from virtual private networks to artificial intelligence—offers diverse benefits that businesses can use to enhance their operations. But new technology also comes with inherent vulnerabilities that can jeopardize a company’s infrastructure, reputation, and other assets. However, by employing best practices and remaining vigilant, businesses can protect themselves as they evolve right along with exciting new technological applications.

Retail
A rendering of The Shoppes at Sun Mountain.

© Cameron Johnson | A&C Investment Group

Retail
A rendering of The Shoppes at Sun Mountain.

© Cameron Johnson | A&C Investment Group

The Shoppes at Sun Mountain
Wasilla grows with first Sonic, a Planet Fitness, retail, residential options
By Sam Friedman
R

eal estate developer Cameron Johnson is building a mixed-use walkable community amidst one of the last large pieces of undeveloped land along the Parks Highway in Wasilla.

His plans for the thirty-two acre Shoppes at Sun Mountain include the first Sonic Drive-In restaurant in Alaska, other restaurants, professional offices, a Planet Fitness gym, townhouse condominiums, and senior housing.

“There really isn’t anything else in the Valley that has that walkability factor, where you can walk out your front door and walk to the gym, go shopping, have lunch, go to the bank, and everything is within walking distance. That’s what we want to develop,” he says.

HR MATTERS
What Does House Bill 79 Mean to Your Business?
Omnibus Workers’ Compensation Changes, Effective August 1, 2019
By Brian Zematis
R

elax. Seriously, let’s do this together. Sink into your chair. Breathe in deeply for five seconds. Hold that breath for a second. Now release. Ahh… that feels good right? So does the idea that we have all just about made it through another whirlwind summer season. This also means as of August 1, we have now seen the full enactment of 2018’s House Bill 79—Omnibus Workers’ Compensation.

Now that we are all subject to House Bill 79, it is the perfect time to take stock of the changes we have had to navigate over the last year and make sure we are all still on course. We will take this one step at a time:

The Second Injury Fund is no longer open for business. Employers no longer need to make contributions to the fund and no longer benefit from payments from the fund either.

Small Business
A Small Business Success Story
Multi-generational family lodge and winery flourishes in Kachemak Bay
By McKibben Jackinsky
Samples of Alaskan-made wine are served at Bear Creek Winery

© Scott Dickerson | Bear Creek Winery and Lodging

P

ut Bear Creek Winery and Lodging next to other wineries in the world—castle-neighboring wineries in Alsace, France; Tuscany wineries scattered from seashore to rolling countryside; the California wineries of Sonoma County—and this family-run Alaska business stands tall.

It has an award-winning product, can claim bragging rights for using Alaska fruits and berries, offers overnight accommodations designed with Alaskans in mind, has a picture-perfect setting near the shores of Kachemak Bay, has roots that sink deep into its surrounding community, and is a multi-generational enterprise.

Using the kitchen in the family’s home a few miles east of Homer, Bill Fry began trying his hand at winemaking in the 1990s. Positive reactions from friends to whom Bill gave bottles of his wine as gifts for birthdays, holidays, and special occasions encouraged the budding vintner. It wasn’t long before the kitchen became too small for his growing interest and Bill was forced to find a bigger space to set up shop: the garage. Blueberries, raspberries, rhubarb—just name it and Bill found a way to incorporate it in his wine-making experiments.

Tourism
Travel Like a Local
How businesses are making Alaska a year-round destination
By Vanessa Orr
Alaska is a year-round destination—and visitors can even fish in the winter.

© Matt Hage | State of Alaska

Small Business
Alaska is a year-round destination—and visitors can even fish in the winter.

© Matt Hage | State of Alaska

Travel Like a Local
How businesses are making Alaska a year-round destination
By Vanessa Orr
A

laska is a wonderful place to live year-round, but most people who choose to visit come during the warmer summer months. While this is a big boost to the economy, some companies are encouraging travelers to come earlier and stay longer, creating more lucrative shoulder seasons in April, May, September, and October.

The Alaska Travel Industry Association (ATIA) promotes the state as a year-round destination, and that includes attracting visitors during the shoulder seasons. “If we can get people to visit at this time of year, it really benefits our communities and businesses,” explains Sarah Leonard, ATIA president and CEO. “Businesses can stay open longer, which makes them available to residents as well as visitors. And if the Alaska tourism industry strengthens our year-round visitor numbers, it also allows these businesses to hire more residents, generating more economic activity for these companies and for Alaska.”

Why Visit during the Shoulder Season?

There are many reasons why visitors might want to come to Alaska when it’s not teeming with tourists—especially if the point of their vacation is to get away from it all. Restaurants and shops are far less crowded. And there’s less competition when it comes to seeing Alaska in its natural state.

UnCruise Adventures has made a point of marketing to the shoulder season traveler. Their “Alaska Awakening” campaign, launched two years ago, invites visitors to enjoy a more intimate experience in the great outdoors.

ALASKA NATIVE SPECIAL SECTION
Getting to Know Alaska’s Regional ANCs
Protecting culture, traditions, and lands while operating successful businesses
By Kathryn Mackenzie

Since they were established as corporations in the early 1970s, the twelve Alaska Native Regional corporations have worked tirelessly to uplift their respective regions, their shareholders, and the state’s economy as a whole. All together they reported more than $10.5 billion in revenue last year—revenue that creates opportunities; protects their lands, culture, and resources; and provides investment opportunities for the entire state and, more importantly, their shareholders.

This year Alaska Business asked each corporation’s top executives to share a little about their business, new initiatives, and what makes them unique in an already rarified group. We are grateful to every person who took the time out his or her (very) busy schedule to offer this valuable insight into the past, present, and future of the regional corporations.

In no particular order, we present a snapshot of the twelve Alaska Native Regional Corporations.

Alaska Native Special Section
Strong Vision and Steady Growth
Bering Straits Native Corporation: defined by conscientious leaders and cultural values
Alaska Native Special Section
Strong Vision and Steady Growth
Bering Straits Native Corporation: defined by conscientious leaders and cultural values
By Tasha Anderson
T

he relatively short history of the corporations formed by the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act is one of determined perseverance. The corporations established in the early 1970s were charged with the responsibility of creating economic opportunity to support their region and shareholders, using surface and/or subsurface real estate and money conveyed as part of the settlement. But experience participating in the corporate sphere isn’t something one can transfer via signed agreement, and many corporations struggled in their early years.

For Bering Straits Native Corporation (BSNC), one of the corporation’s most challenging years was 1986, when it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. According to a four-part BSNC Land Series by Vice President of Media and External Affairs Matt Ganley, “BSNC made errors, and in some cases was the recipient of unscrupulous or inadequate investment and business advice. Companies were purchased and investments made with the long-term goal of developing a business portfolio that would enhance the original ANCSA settlement. These often proved to be companies that looked promising but had little value as long-range growth strategies. As the late Charlie Johnson once said, ‘We bought a tire company with no tires and a construction company with no equipment.’”

What followed was a “series of complex agreements designed to protect BSNC’s land base, repay the village corporations for the lost settlement funds, and bring BSNC back from bankruptcy.”

Alaska Native Special Section
2019 Alaska Native Corporations Directory
Alaska Native Special Section
2019 Alaska Native Corporations Directory
Alaska Native Special Section
2019 Alaska Native Corporations Directory
W

elcome to the 2019 Alaska Native Corporations Directory. This year we sent surveys to both the regional and village corporations in order to provide an even more comprehensive listing of Alaska’s native organizations. We appreciate all of the time and effort put into gathering and reporting this data to us, and we look forward to this list becoming even more robust in years to come. For more directory content and information, please visit akbizmag.com/lists/.

Afognak Native Corporation

Afognak Native Corporation, Alutiiq, and their subsidiaries provide an exceptional track record of services in the government and commercial sectors worldwide, including: leasing; construction; timber; engineering; security; logistics, operations, and maintenance; oilfield; and youth services.

Top Executive: Greg Hambright, President/CEO
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 4,546/151
Acreage: 248,000
Number of Shareholders: 1,185
Subsidiaries: Shields Point, Alutiiq Advanced Security Solutions, Alutiiq Construction Services, Alutiiq Education & Training, Alutiiq Essential Services Alutiiq General Contractors, Alutiiq International Solutions, Alutiiq Professional Services, Alutiiq Security & Technology, Alutiiq Commercial Enterprises, Alutiiq 3SG, Alutiiq Technical Services, Alutiiq Pacific, Alutiiq Diversified Services, Alutiiq Management Services, Alutiiq Manufacturing Contractors, Alutiiq-Mele, Alutiiq Professional Training, Alutiiq Global Solutions, Afognak Near Island, Afognak Arctic Development, Afognak C Street, Marka Bay, Alutiiq Business Services, Alutiiq Logistics & Maintenance Services, Alutiiq Solutions, Alcyon, Inc., Alutiiq Information Management, Alutiiq Career Ventures, Afognak Leasing, McCallie Associates, Inc., Oxbow Data Management Systems, Alutiiq Leasing Company, Alutiiq Employee Leasing, Alutiiq Professional Consulting, Alutiiq, Red Peak Technical Services

300 Alimaq Dr. Kodiak, AK 99615
907-486-6014
afognak.com
alutiiq.com

Ahtna, Inc.

Ahtna’s principle activities include construction, engineering, environmental, facilities management, surveying, security, military training, janitorial, healthcare and medical records management, government contracting, land management and resource development, and oil and gas pipeline services.

Top Executive: Michelle Anderson, President
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 1,101/292
Acreage: 1.5 million
Number of Shareholders: 2,065
Subsidiaries: Ahtna Development Corp., Ahtna Facility Services, Inc., Ahtna Support & Training Services, Ahtna Government Services Corp., Ahtna Construction & Primary Products Company, Ahtna Design Build, Inc., Ahtna Professional Services, Inc., Ahtna Environmental, Inc., Ahtna Technologies, Inc., AKHI, Ahtna Global, Ahtna Logistics, Tolsona Oil & Gas Exploration, Ahtna Engineering Services, AAA Valley Gravel, Ahtna Netiye’, Ahtna Infrastructure & Technologies, Ahtna Integrated Services, Ahtna Marine & Construction Company, Ahtna Solution

PO Box 649, Glennallen, AK 99588
907-822-3476
ahtna-inc.com
[email protected]
facebook.com/Ahtna.Inc
twitter.com/ahtnainc
linkedin.com/company/ahtna-inc

Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.

Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc. (AKI) is an Alaska Native Village Corporation specializing in commercial real estate, private equity, government products and services, tourism, and lands management.

Top Executive: Michael Bradshaw, President/CEO
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 11/3
Acreage: 77,000
Number of Shareholders: 278

1400 W. Benson Blvd. #425, Anchorage, AK 99503
907-258-0604
aki-kodiak.com
[email protected]
linkedin.com/company/akhiok-kaguyak-inc

alaska native special section
Harvesting Carbon Credits
$370 million in credits registered in Alaska since 2015
By Sam Friedman
T

here’s money to be made in promising to reduce your company’s environmental footprint by cutting down fewer trees. And Alaska’s largest landowners are getting behind this new type of business in a big way.

Alaska is now the largest producer of forestry carbon offsets for California’s greenhouse gas cap and trade program, despite qualifying to sell the credits years behind the contiguous United States. Thus far, four Alaska Native regional corporations and eight village corporations have received carbon offset credits through the program or have started the process of registering credits.

At current prices of about $13 per offset credit, the carbon offsets registered in Alaska are worth about $370 million. And that’s just the initial carbon credits awarded for these projects. As forests continue to grow, they will produce a smaller number of new credits equal to the value of the carbon dioxide stored in the new growth compared to similar forestland outside the project.

The new market created by California’s greenhouse gas rules opened to Alaska in 2015. It’s scheduled to partially close in 2021, with a new regulatory change that will cut demand for forestry credits produced in Alaska by 75 percent.

Oil & Gas
alamy
Oil & Gas
alamy
Movers and Drillers in Cook Inlet
Hilcorp dominates, BlueCrest innovates
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
H

ilcorp Energy continues to dominate the oil exploration scene in Cook Inlet—it’s the only company to put in a bid on the State of Alaska’s annual Cook Inlet basin oil and gas lease sale for the third consecutive year.

The Houston-based company that specializes in mature fields spent $190,350 on three lease tracts totaling 10,286 acres earlier this year, according to the Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Oil and Gas.

“We are pleased to see bid activity in the Cook Inlet lease sale,” DNR Deputy Commissioner Sara Longan said in a prepared statement earlier this year. “We recognize the focus of investment has been on the North Slope in recent years. Nevertheless, significant investment is made to sustain current Cook Inlet production, while exploration activities continue to inform and support future development.”

Construction
Construction
Upgrades, New Construction to Improve Alaska’s Healthcare Access
Multiple projects moving forward while budget uncertainty put others on hold
By Vanessa Orr
H

ealthcare construction in Alaska is influenced by many different factors, including an aging population; the need for specialized services such as mental health and addiction treatment; technological advancements; and requirements to update or replace facilities and equipment in order to meet state and federal regulations. Yet while it’s important to invest in expanding, renovating, or even building brand new facilities, healthcare systems must at the same time keep a very tight grip on expenses, especially in this time of economic uncertainty.

Alaska Regional
At Alaska Regional, for example, construction is underway on replacement equipment projects and on renovations required to meet regulatory requirements. Work is also taking place to repair damage caused by the earthquake in November 2018. Other projects, such as the addition of twenty-four new psychiatric inpatient beds, are on hold.
Mining
123RF / alamy
Mining
123RF / alamy
Out of the Mine and into the Smelter
Alaska’s metal mines export commodities to import good jobs and a strong economy
By Brad Joyal
M

ining has long been a key fixture of Alaska’s economy. On a small scale, people flock to the 49th state to tour different operations. Kennecott Mine was once a booming copper mining site and is now a National Historic Landmark, attracting tourists eager to visit the ghost town and get a feel of the Gold Rush era it once dominated. Gold Dredge No. 8 provides tourists with an opportunity to pan for gold while learning more about the Interior’s mining history. Although some tourists might visit Alaska to learn about the state’s mining past, the industry remains at the center of the state’s economy today.

The Alaska mining industry includes exploration, mine development, and production, and it continues to provide Alaskans with thousands of jobs while generating millions of dollars of personal income. Alaska’s six large operating mines—Fort Knox, Greens Creek, Kensington, Red Dog, Usibelli, and Pogo—provided 2,400 full-time jobs of the state’s nearly 4,500 mining industry jobs in 2018. In all, there were 9,200 direct and indirect mining industry jobs in 2018, and those jobs dished out $715 million in payroll. Development spending in 2018 was $170 million and the export value from Alaska production was $1.8 billion.

Mineral exports accounted for 36 percent of Alaska’s export total in 2017, and all signs point to mined commodities staying one of the state’s leading exports for years to come.

Alaska Trends -Mine,Mine,Mine

operating mines and developing projects graph
A Timeline of Mining Production in Alaska
A Timeline of Mining Production in Alaska
Employment in the Mines
Employment in the Mines
Greens Creek is the largest Southeast Alaska for-profit employer, in terms of payroll.

Kensington is 2nd largest private sector employer in Southeast Alaska in terms of payroll; over $36 million in 2017.

Pogo paid approximately $44 million in wages.

Museums
Museums
History, Culture, and Art
The Last Frontier is rich with history and home to talented and passionate craftspeople and artists. Museums around the state provide an amazing opportunity to learn more about the state’s past and present, as well as to see how those who love Alaska the most portray the state through their art. Below is a selection of museums in the state’s largest population centers.
In Anchorage
“Through a combination of art and design, history, science and culture, the Anchorage Museum creates a rich, deep understanding of the human experience and offers something for everyone.”
anchoragemuseum.org

The Alaska Veterans Museum’s mission is to “create a museum for the inspiration, remembrance and preservation of the memory of veterans and of their sacrifices for America’s freedom.”
alaskaveterans.org

Events Calendar
Events Calendar
SEP
21
Equinox Marathon
Most of the Equinox Marathon’s course is on trails that climb up and over Ester Dome, making this running event a fun challenge. The marathon has a ten-hour cutoff, so those who choose to walk instead of run can complete the course as long as they maintain a steady pace. In addition, there’s a marathon relay, allowing participants to run just one-third of the course.
equinoxmarathon.org
Girdwood
JUN
1-2
Fiddlehead Festival

This festival is hosted by Alyeska Resort and is a celebration of the fiddlehead fern season and summer music in the mountains; the family-oriented, outdoor event features live music, local arts and crafts booths, beer and wine garden, cooking demos, 5K Fun Run, and children’s activities. Alyeska Resort’s talented chefs host hands-on demonstrations and share techniques for cooking with fiddleheads. alyeskaresort.com

AK Biz: Events Calendar Equinox Marathon
Anchorage
SEP
7
Champagne Pops
This elegant black-tie evening features intimate cabaret style seating, fine fare, a short live auction, and a Baton Drawing—one lucky guest will conduct the Anchorage Symphony Orchestra (ASO). All proceeds benefit the ASO. anchoragesymphony.org
SEP
7
VegFest
Alaska VegFest is organized by the Alaska Vegan Society and is an opportunity to learn from experts about a plant-based diet and vegan lifestyle. This event takes place at Grant Hall at Alaska Pacific University and features guest speakers Brenda Davis, Emily Boller, and Jenny Brown. alaskavegfest.com
GIRDWOOD
SEP
14
Alyeska Climbathon
The Alyeska Climbathon is an endurance event where participants will walk, hike, and run up the steep North Face Trail of Mount Alyeska and ride the Tram down as many times as possible from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. This event is a fundraiser for women’s cancer. alyeskaresort.com
SEP
20-21
27-28

Oktoberfest at Alyeska Resort

Celebrate German traditions, the changing of the seasons, and, of course, beer. This event spans over two weekends and features authentic Bavarian fare and festivities including full polka band and other live performances. Open to all ages and free admission at Alyeska Resort. alyeskaresort.com
Inside Alaska Business
UAF
UAF
The first cohort of the collaborative veterinary program offered by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Colorado State University graduated this year. The collaborative veterinary training program allows ten students to enroll each year, giving preference to Alaska residents. Students attend veterinary medicine courses at UAF for the first two years and at CSU for the last two years. The program was established between the two land-grant universities to give students in Alaska access to a top-ranked veterinary medicine education partially in their home state, where veterinarians are in high demand. Additionally, the partnership gives CSU veterinary students an opportunity to learn about Alaska fish and wildlife, marine animal science, and sports medicine and rehabilitation of sled dogs.
uaf.edu
Hilton Anchorage
Columbia Sussex, which has owned and managed The Hilton Anchorage since 2006, recently completed an extensive multi-million dollar renovation, including upgrades to the lobby, dining establishments, guest rooms, fitness center, and conference spaces.

The hotel’s new guest room design celebrates the up-to-date and accessible feeling of Hilton hotels. The natural color palette of earth and water tones highlights the beautiful colors of Alaska’s pristine wilderness and Northern Lights with a modern and comfortable atmosphere. columbiasussex.com

Business Events

September
September 23-25
NW AAAE Annual Conference
Westmark Fairbanks: The Northwest Chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives annual conference includes a tour of the Fairbanks International Airport, networking luncheon, and educational sessions.
nwaaae.site-ym.com/page/NWAAAEannual
September 23-27
Alaska Fire Conference

Ketchikan: The conference includes training, workshops, lectures, and a firefighter competition. alaskafireconference.com

September 23-27
IAWP 2019 Conference
Dena’ina Center, Anchorage: The theme for the 2019 conference of the International Association of Women Police is “Mentoring the Next Generation.” iawp2019.womenpoliceofalaska.org
September 25-28
Museums Alaska Annual Conference
Best Western Kodiak Inn and Convention Center: This year’s conference theme is “Critical Conversations: Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, and Inclusion,” as “the museum field is currently engaging in critical conversations regarding how our institutions can evolve to become more equitable, inclusive, diverse, and accessible.” ahsmaconference.org
September 26-28
ASA Fall Conference
Fairbanks: The Alaska Council of School Administrators’ unifying purpose is to support educational leaders through professional forums, provide a voice that champions possibilities for all students, and purposeful advocacy for public education. alaskaacsa.org
September 27
Alaska Business Top 49ers Luncheon
Anchorage Marriott Downtown: Come honor the top forty-nine Alaska companies ranked by revenue at our annual luncheon. 907-276-4373 | akbizmag.com
Right Moves
Alaska Business
Alaska Business is pleased to announce our newest staff addition, Monica Sterchi-Lowman; she joins us as our new Art Director. For the last ten years, Sterchi-Lowman owned and operated a boutique design studio, where she worked with organizations around the world. Through her experience with a broad spectrum of organizations, she found her passion for design that focuses on promoting education, youth, and community development.

A long-time supporter of the Anchorage community, Sterchi-Lowman has served on several nonprofit boards and was a founding member of AIGA Alaska, of which she currently serves as president. She is also a member of the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame board and a past board member of the Zonta Yellow Rose Foundation.

Monica Sterchi-Lowman
Sterchi-Lowman
HealtheConnect
HealtheConnect has added four new staff to its Anchorage team.
Nicole Licht was hired as Communications & Engagement Manager; she spent the last six years working for Procare Home Medical as their sales and marketing manager. Licht has twelve years of experience in healthcare sales and marketing in Alaska.
Nicole Licht
Licht
Rachel Lawler has been hired as the Health IT Training Coordinator. Previously she was with Beacon Occupational Health and Safety Services for eight years where she was in charge of clinical operations. She has fourteen years of experience in healthcare.
Rachel Lawler
Lawler

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand?
The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9/11 by Lawrence Wright, which is a look at how 9/11 happened; Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari, which is a complete history of the entire human species; and The Last Magician by Lisa Maxwell, a fantasy book that takes place in historic New York City.

What movie do you recommend to everyone?
Silence of the Lambs is one of my all-time favorite movies just because of how amazing the acting is. Going old school—Charade with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn

What’s the first thing you do after work?
I change out of my “work armor” clothes and into something I feel is more comfortable, and then I turn on some music.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live?
If I didn’t have to worry about money, New York City, without a doubt.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
A bald eagle—it’s got nothing to do with being patriotic, they’re just beautiful birds and being able to get one to do my bidding would be pretty awesome.

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand?
The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9/11 by Lawrence Wright, which is a look at how 9/11 happened; Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari, which is a complete history of the entire human species; and The Last Magician by Lisa Maxwell, a fantasy book that takes place in historic New York City.

What movie do you recommend to everyone?
Silence of the Lambs is one of my all-time favorite movies just because of how amazing the acting is. Going old school—Charade with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn

What’s the first thing you do after work?
I change out of my “work armor” clothes and into something I feel is more comfortable, and then I turn on some music.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live?
If I didn’t have to worry about money, New York City, without a doubt.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
A bald eagle—it’s got nothing to do with being patriotic, they’re just beautiful birds and being able to get one to do my bidding would be pretty awesome.

Off the Cuff

Jason Hodges
J

ason Hodges is the Executive Director of the Anchorage Concert Association, a role he’s been performing for more than eleven years. He focuses on expanding the reach of the Anchorage Concert Association, giving as many people as possible in the community exposure to the performing arts. He says his favorite part of the job is the end of a performance when the audience applauds: “While that applause is not for me—it’s for the artist on the stage—I take a moment to experience it and take a piece for myself because we were a small part in helping put the audience together with the artist to create that magic, that moment of community—and it’s a great moment.”

Alaska Business: What do you do in your free time?
Jason Hodges: For the last couple of years photography has been something I’ve been really passionate about. Cooking is another huge one.

AB: Is there a skill you’re currently developing or have always wanted to learn?
Hegna: There was a period of time right after college when I was taking piano lessons, but then the woman who was teaching the class wanted me to do a recital… and I just wanted to learn, so I kind of gave it up then. [Playing] piano is something I wish I’d done or could learn without having to find 10,000 hours to achieve mastery, as Malcolm Gladwell would say.

Thanks for reading our September 2019 issue!