Looking at worldwide LNG and Alaska’s North Slope
May 2019
MAY 2019 | Volume 35 | Number 5 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Plane Protection

Aviation insurance is a must-have on the ground and in the air
By Tracy Barbour

New Tech, New Oil

Maximizing legacy fields and identifying new plays
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Choppy Waters

Climate change, China loom over stronger forecasted salmon runs
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Handling Hazmat

Training is crucial to managing hazardous waste
By Vanessa Orr

Infrastructure Update

Summer road construction
projects in 2019
By Tasha Anderson

Alaska Grown

Interest in farming, local foods grows
By Vanessa Orr
© Amy Pettit

correction

On page 77 of the April issue of Alaska Business the captions for the images were transposed. Para-professional Glenn Charlie is pictured in the bottom image working one-on-one with a student.

Productive Partnerships

Preserving tradition and culture in the world of commerce
By Julie Stricker
NANA

Oil & Gas Special Section

Eni Expands

Increasing exploration and production in oil, gas, and renewables
By Julie Stricker
Eni

Welcome to the LNG Era

Projects around the world and how Alaska LNG stands up
By Tasha Anderson
Anadarko

Far from Tapped Out

2019 sees renewed vigor on the Slope
By Kathryn Mackenzie

International Interest in the North Slope

Global companies pursue exploration and production in Alaska
By Tasha Anderson
About The Cover

Alaska Business Magazine May 2019 Cover In the oil and gas industry in Alaska, traditionally it’s oil that’s been pulling the heavy weight. And while oil isn’t going away any time soon, projections for the near future point at gas as bursting with potential. Alaska LNG, a long-dreamt project to get stranded North Slope natural gas to market, has seen more progress in the last year or two than it has seen in decades, but Alaska LNG isn’t the only project looking to take advantage of rising demand for natural gas in Asia and Europe. However Alaska participates in the LNG market, what’s undeniable is the state’s need to keep an eye forward instead of holding ourselves back.

Cover Design by David Geiger, Art Director
Volume 35, #5
Published by Alaska Business
Publishing Co. Anchorage, Alaska
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 [email protected]
Associate Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2906 [email protected]
Art Director
David Geiger
257-2916 [email protected]
Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 [email protected]
Photo Contributor
Judy Patrick
BUSINESS STAFF
President
Billie Martin
VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 [email protected]
VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 [email protected]
Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 [email protected]
Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 [email protected]
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Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 [email protected]izmag.com
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257-2914 [email protected]
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From the Editor

Oil Matters
M

ay means many things in Alaska. Break-up is over, temperatures are rising, and most Alaskans are already dreaming of long days reserved for hiking, hunting, fishing… basically all things outdoors. After months of cold and darkness, we’re excited and optimistic about the summer months ahead.

The same can be said for the oil and gas industry. Much like a spring renewal, the North Slope in particular is undergoing a rebirth of its own with a few new players entering the scene and long-time operators increasing their investment allocation to further support exploration and development efforts in the region.

The Alaska Department of Revenue’s 2019 Spring Revenue Forecast predicts oil production will experience a slight decrease in the near future but expects production to increase next year. In the coming years the general consensus is that the North Slope will continue to see a surge in interest, exploration, and production from both Outside interests and Alaska’s veteran oil and gas companies such ConocoPhillips with its Greater Moose’s 2 and Willow projects, Hilcorp with its Moose Pad wells at Milne Point, and BP’s recent seismic survey of 400 square miles of Prudhoe Bay designed to find previously “hidden” pockets of oil through sonic waves.

Kathryn Mackenzie

Kathryn Mackenzie
Managing Editor, Alaska Business

Insurance
Anchorage-based Security Aviation’s fleet of aircraft.

Security Aviation

Insurance
Anchorage-based Security Aviation’s fleet of aircraft.

Security Aviation

Plane Protection
Aviation insurance is a must-have on the ground and in the air
By Tracy Barbour
A

viation insurance is a critical facet of doing business at Security Aviation. The Anchorage air charter company maintains a fleet of eight aircraft: one Learjet 45, four Cessna Conquests, and three Piper Navajo Chieftans. Each year, Security Aviation’s pilots fly 2,500 to 3,000 hours in Alaska, Canada, and the Lower 48. And the company pays approximately $445,000 annually to insure its planes, passengers, and other assets. “It’s an expensive cost of doing business,” says President and CEO Joe Kapper.

Aviation insurance is vital in Alaska, where airplanes are as commonplace as pickup trucks in Texas. Alaska has six times as many pilots per capita and sixteen times as many aircraft per capita as the rest of the nation.

Alaska Native

Children in Nuiqsut participate in a cross-country ski program called Skiku funded by ConocoPhillips.

ConocoPhillips Alaska

Alaska Native

Children in Nuiqsut participate in a cross-country ski program called Skiku funded by ConocoPhillips.

ConocoPhillips Alaska

Productive Partnerships
Preserving tradition and culture in the world of commerce
By Julie Stricker
I

n 2018, ConocoPhillips’ winter work plan included drilling an exploration well, Putu 2, which was only four miles from the North Slope village of Nuiqsut.

Naturally, the 450 village residents were concerned about potential impacts from the project, says Lisa Pekich, director of village outreach for ConocoPhillips. So long before any drilling took place, the oil company took the time to meet with residents and the North Slope Borough to address those concerns.

“There were lots of concerns in the community about being that close, from emergency response to, just in general, seeing the facility,” Pekich says. “Air emissions are a concern—any community that’s got industrial activity around it has concerns about air emissions.”

Telecom & Tech

Example of a 96-wells plate filled with soil samples, ready for extraction. Samples from different locations sometimes differ in their appearances as is clear from the differing coloration in the wells of this plate.

Biodentify

Telecom & Tech

Example of a 96-wells plate filled with soil samples, ready for extraction. Samples from different locations sometimes differ in their appearances as is clear from the differing coloration in the wells of this plate.

Biodentify

New Tech, New Oil
Maximizing legacy fields and identifying new plays
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
T

echnology developed over the last few years—and which continues to be developed today—is helping oil and gas exploration companies discover and access a wealth of new resources.

This technology ranges from ConocoPhillips Alaska’s steerable drilling liner and BP’s proprietary digital rocks technology program to Netherland-based Biodentify’s patented technology developed to analyze surface soil or seabed samples, recognizing otherwise undetectable hydrocarbon microseepage from prospective areas.

Oil & Gas Special Section | LNG
Anadarko’s Mozambique LNG project, if built, will be the first LNG project in the country.

Anadarko

Oil & Gas Special Section | LNG
Anadarko’s Mozambique LNG project, if built, will be the first LNG project in the country.

Anadarko

Welcome to the LNG Era
Projects around the world and how Alaska LNG stands up
By Tasha Anderson
A

s of late March technical teams from BP and ExxonMobil were scheduled to meet with Alaska Gasline Development Corporation (ADGC) representatives in Houston for a cost reduction workshop as a tool to increase the viability of AK LNG moving forward. The discussions were anticipated to start April 2 and involve at least twenty-five individuals.

This followed a March 8 announcement that AGDC signed an agreement with BP and ExxonMobil to collaborate on various methods to advance the project and improve its competitiveness.

Oil & Gas Special Section | overview
ConocoPhillips’ Alpine field. The company plans for GMT2 to connect to the Alpine production center for processing via GMT1 and CD5 infrastructure.

ConocoPhillips

Oil & Gas Special Section | overview
ConocoPhillips’ Alpine field. The company plans for GMT2 to connect to the Alpine production center for processing via GMT1 and CD5 infrastructure.

ConocoPhillips

Far From Tapped Out
2019 sees renewed vigor on the Slope
By Kathryn Mackenzie
M

aking predictions about when an oilfield will come online and how much oil that field will produce is an inexact science at best. The number of factors involved in successfully finding and extracting oil from start to finish is countless. Oil and gas exploration is dependent on climate, price volatility, budgetary restraints (both state and corporate), land access, permitting, safety requirements, technology, and… shall we go on? While it’s close to impossible to say exactly how much oil will come from the North Slope in the coming years, it’s roundly accepted the state will see a major uptick in activity in the region thanks in part to The More Alaska Production Act, also known as SB 21, which has drawn billions of dollars in new investment to Alaska over the past several years, causing Alaska’s major oil and gas players (and some newcomers) to invest their faith and money in the Alaska Arctic with new and ongoing projects.

Oil & Gas Special Section | Directory

2019 Alaska Business
Oil & Gas
Directory

Oil & Gas Special Section | Directory

2019 Alaska Business
Oil & Gas
Directory

Oil & Gas Special Section | Directory

2019 Alaska Business
Oil & Gas
Directory
Exploration/Production

Alaska Gasline Development Corporation

Top Executive: Joe Dubler, Interim Pres.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 2010/2010
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 20/20
agdc.us | [email protected]

Alaska LNG is an integrated gas infrastructure project with three major components: a gas treatment plant located at Prudhoe Bay, an 807-mile pipeline with offtakes, and a natural gas liquefaction plant located in Nikiski. Alaska LNG will provide gas for Alaskans and LNG for export for generations.
3201 C St., Suite 200, Anchorage, AK 99503
907-330-6300

BP Exploration (Alaska)

Top Executive: Janet Weiss, BP AK Pres.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1959/1959
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 74,000/1,500
alaska.bp.com

BP operates the Greater Prudhoe Bay area, which consists of the Prudhoe Bay field, one of North America’s largest oilfields. This area produces more than half of Alaska’s oil and gas production. BP Alaska employs more than 1,500 people and supports more than 8,300 jobs in Alaska.
PO Box 196612, Anchorage, AK 99515-6612
907-561-5111

ConocoPhillips Alaska

Top Executive: Joe Marushack, Pres.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1952/1952
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 11,100/1,100
conocophillipsalaska.com
[email protected]

conocophillips | @COP_Alaska

An independent exploration and production company. We are Alaska’s largest oil producer and have been a leader in oil and gas exploration and development in the state for more than fifty years.
700 G St., PO Box 100360, Anchorage, AK 99510
907-276-1215

Doyon Drilling

Top Executive: Ron Wilson, Pres./GM
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1982/1982
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 391/391

Doyon Drilling operates on the North Slope of Alaska with rigs designed to drill in northern Alaska conditions. The company consistently strives to improve its operations and has some of the most technologically advanced land drilling rigs in the world.
11500 C St., Suite 200, Anchorage, AK 99515
907-563-5530

Eni Petroleum

Top Executive: Luca Pellicciotta, VP Technical Svcs.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1926/2006
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 33,000/400

Eni is an integrated energy company with a presence in 71 countries and more than 33,000 employees. Eni operates in oil and gas exploration, production, transportation, transformation, and marketing in petrochemicals, oilfield services construction, and engineering.
3800 Centerpoint Dr., Suite 300, Anchorage, AK 99503
907-865-3300
ExxonMobil Alaska

Top Executive: Darlene Gates, Production Mgr.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1870/1954
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 70,000/197

ExxonMobil is the largest holder of discovered gas resources and the second largest oil producer in Alaska. The company operates the Point Thomson facility on the North Slope to produce natural gas condensate and is also the largest interest owner of the Prudhoe Bay unit.
PO Box 196601, Anchorage, AK 99519
907-561-5331

Marathon Petroleum

Top Executive: Cameron Hunt, VP Refining
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1969/1969
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: -/280
marathonpetroleum.com

Located on the Cook Inlet, 60 miles southwest of Anchorage, the 72,000 (bpd) Kenai Refinery has been producing gasoline and gasoline blendstocks, jet fuel, diesel fuel, heating oil and heavy fuel oils, propane, and asphalt since 1969.
1601 Tidewater Rd., Anchorage, AK 99501
907-261-7221

Oil Search

Top Executive: Keiran Wulff, Pres. AK
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1929/2018
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: ~1,300/~100
oilsearch.com

Among the top five oil and gas lease holders on Alaska’s North Slope and operator of the Pikka Unit located east of the Colville River and seven miles northeast of Nuiqsut. Pikka Unit first oil is planned for 2025.
PO Box 240927, Anchorage, AK 99524
907-375-4600

Oil & Gas Special Section | foreign investment
Oil & Gas Special Section | foreign investment
International Interest in the North Slope
Global companies pursue exploration and production in Alaska
By Tasha Anderson
A

NS West Coast oil prices are again (slowly) on the rise since a dip in 2018. Last year started with oil in the mid- to high-$60 per barrel range, hitting $80 a barrel in June and then reaching a 2018 high of $85.36 on October 3 before dipping back into the $60 and $50 range for the rest of the year. As of April 1, ANS oil hit $70 again and continues to gradually climb upward.

Overall, oil prices have slowly and steadily trended up. Other positive news from the Slope includes BP’s investment in a massive, 450-acre seismic program that wrapped up last month; Pantheon Resources confirmed a successful flow test at its Alkaid well in April; and Oil Search flowed oil from two wells in its Pikka unit in April.

Oil & Gas Special Section | ENI
Eni has operations all over the world.

Eni

Oil & Gas Special Section | ENI
Eni has operations all over the world.

ENI

Eni Expands
Increasing exploration and production in oil, gas, and renewables
By Julie Stricker
I

talian energy company Eni is quietly making a splash in global energy circles, including Alaska’s North Slope oil patch. The company entered the area and began production in 2011, developing the Nikaitchuq field, which it fully owns and operates.

The field is located offshore in shallow water and is estimated to have recoverable reserves of 220 million barrels of oil and an operating life of thirty years. Eni plans to make the most of it, including using it as a base to reach nearby federal leases.

AGRICULTURE
Alaska Grown
Interest in farming, local foods grows
By Vanessa Orr
O

nly 5 percent of the food that is consumed in Alaska is grown in Alaska. This means that the rest of what Alaskans eat needs to be flown or barged in from other areas, making the state food insecure.

With open land as far as the eye can see, how can this be possible? And what can be done to increase the amount of local fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat reaching Alaska tables?

The good news is that more Alaskans are interested in farming than ever before, and Alaska consumers are driving the market to provide fresh foods that are grown and harvested locally. But to truly meet the needs of the 49th State, it’s going to take more investment in infrastructure—such as flash freezing facilities for fruits and vegetables—to take the state’s food system to the next level.

Raised beds prepped for planting in front of Pioneer Peak on the VanderWeele farm.

© Amy Pettit

AGRICULTURE
Alaska Grown
Interest in farming, local foods grows
By Vanessa Orr
O

nly 5 percent of the food that is consumed in Alaska is grown in Alaska. This means that the rest of what Alaskans eat needs to be flown or barged in from other areas, making the state food insecure.

With open land as far as the eye can see, how can this be possible? And what can be done to increase the amount of local fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat reaching Alaska tables?

The good news is that more Alaskans are interested in farming than ever before, and Alaska consumers are driving the market to provide fresh foods that are grown and harvested locally. But to truly meet the needs of the 49th State, it’s going to take more investment in infrastructure—such as flash freezing facilities for fruits and vegetables—to take the state’s food system to the next level.

Raised beds prepped for planting in front of Pioneer Peak on the VanderWeele farm.

© Amy Pettit

FISHERIES
Choppy Waters
FISHERIES
Choppy Waters
Climate change, China loom over stronger forecasted salmon runs
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
T

his year’s salmon runs will provide insight into the theory that a warm water anomaly in the Gulf of Alaska in 2015 was to blame for poor runs nearly everywhere in the Last Frontier (with the exception of the record-setting run of sockeye in Bristol Bay) last year.

“The very large Bristol Bay sockeye harvest, 41.9 million, was definitely the highlight of 2018. Another highlight were substantial chum salmon harvests in Southeast Alaska, 11.5 million, and Prince William Sound, 3.5 million,” says Rich Brenner, a biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADFG).

If the forecast for 2019 is realized, Alaska fishermen can look forward to a record harvest of about 29 million chum salmon during 2019, with most of this harvest predicted to come from hatchery chum salmon in Southeast Alaska.

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Leader In All We Do
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Environmental
Participants simulate decontaminating responders during a Lynden Training Center hazmat response training.

Lynden Training Center

Environmental
Participants simulate decontaminating responders during a Lynden Training Center hazmat response training.

Lynden Training Center

Handling Hazmat
Training is crucial to managing hazardous waste
By Vanessa Orr
W

hen hazardous materials, or hazmat, make the news, it is usually because of a large spill or other dangerous condition that requires emergency response and clean up. But the fact is hazardous materials travel through the state every day with little or no fanfare—and that’s because of companies that make sure that these goods are transported safely and securely.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) classifies hazardous materials into nine different hazard classes. These include explosives; gasses; flammable and combustible liquids; flammable solids (such as substances liable to spontaneous combustion and which, on contact with water, emit flammable gases); oxidizing substances and organic peroxides; toxic substances and infectious substances; radioactive materials; corrosive substances; and miscellaneous dangerous goods/hazardous materials and articles.

Construction
Infrastructure Update
Construction will begin this year on the Seward Highway MP 100 to MP 105 improvements project.

© R&M

Construction
Infrastructure Update
Construction will begin this year on the Seward Highway MP 100 to MP 105 improvements project.

© R&M

Summer road construction projects in 2019
By Tasha Anderson
M

ay traditionally signals the beginning of summer construction, including projects statewide to improve or construct roads, bridges, and the affiliated infrastructure. Road projects can take years to design and permit and are generally well-known to the public long before construction begins. This year construction in Alaska may deviate from that slightly because of the anticipation that as the frozen earth thaws, further damage from the November 30, 2018, earthquake may be become apparent. Also, some emergency repairs made at that time were temporary and will require additional work.

For now, the following is a selection of plans that are moving forward for road and bridge construction this summer and fall for projects that have taken the more well-worn project development path.

Circular Logic: Why Roundabouts?

A

ccording to the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities (DOT&PF), in 2000 Alaska didn’t have any roundabouts, but as of early last year the state had more than thirty-six, and that number continues to grow. Roundabouts are commonly included in new road construction, and many intersections across the state have been renovated to integrate roundabout designs. DOT&PF states: “The trend in Alaska mirrors the trend across the United States for a simple reason: [roundabouts] are much safer than a traditional signalized or four-way-stop intersection.”

DOT&PF explains three primary reasons that roundabouts are safer: there are fewer collision points, fewer serious injury crashes, and increased safety for pedestrians.

FOOD TRUCKS
FOOD TRUCKS
Meals on Tires
T

here’s something indescribably special about indulging in fresh food cooked up in the back of a truck. Maybe there’s a bench you politely fight other diners over or maybe you end up awkwardly juggling a drink, napkins, and too-hot-to-eat-but-I-don’t-care food truck offerings in too few hands—but either way you can taste the passion that’s absolutely necessary for a food truck to find success in today’s competitive field. Below Alaska Business has listed just a few food trucks that move around Alaska’s population centers. We’re sure you’ll see a few favorites—and we hope you find some new options to try.

Events Calendar
Events Calendar
KODIAK
MAY
23-27
Kodiak Crab Festival

Crab Fest is a time for the community to celebrate the abundant resources received from the sea. Activities include good food, games, a parade, vendors, and more. kodiakchamber.org

KODIAK
MAY
23-27
Kodiak Crab Festival
This annual fundraising event features pieces by local Alaska Native artists available for purchase through a silent and a live auction. Proceeds from the event underwrite the cost of operating KNBA (90.3 FM), which discovers and shares the music of local and national Indigenous artists and contributes to the dialogue on issues important to Alaska Native and Native American communities. This year’s auction starts at 6 p.m. at the Hotel Captain Cook. nativeartauction.org
AK Biz: Events Calendar Crab Fest
Anchorage
MAY
4-5
Great Alaska Aviation Gathering

This is Alaska’s premier, must-see aviation event with more than 23,000 attendees, including pilots and aviation enthusiasts. Alaska is the “flyingest” state in the union with more pilots and aircraft per capita than anywhere in the world. The gathering takes place at the FedEx Hangar at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. greatalaskaaviationgathering.org

KETCHIKAN
MAY
3
Celebration of the Sea Art Walk

Celebrate art and the start of a new season at the Arts Council’s annual Celebration of the Sea Art Walk. Guests will enjoy the blessing of the fleet, new art pieces by local artists, music, and refreshments. Start at any participating location and enjoy a wonderful spring evening of art. ketchikanarts.org

Business Events

May
May 2-4
ACP Alaska Chapter Meeting

Sheraton Hotel & Spa, Anchorage: ACP is the American College of Physicians, and the annual chapter meeting is an opportunity for CME credits and MOC points. acponline.org

May 2-4
Alaska VFW State Convention
Anchorage: The annual convention includes a Joint Memorial Service, VFW Business Session, guest banquets, and other events. alaskavfw.org
May 16-19
ACUL Annual Meeting
Talkeetna: The Alaska Credit Union League’s annual meeting is an opportunity to gather, network, and learn. alaskacreditunions.org/events.html
May 16-19
Alaska Optometric Association CE Conference
Alyeska Resort, Girdwood: The mission of the AKOA is to influence the future of eye care by ensuring the welfare of Alaskans and promoting the continued development of the profession of optometry. akoa.org
Right Moves
First Alaskans Institute
Cheryl Pitiksuq Johnson has been hired as First Alaskans Institute’s Indigenous Sustainability Advancement Director, and Anna Ts’aayeneekeelno Clock has been hired as the organization’s Indigenous and Intergovernmental Affairs Coordinator. Pitiksuq holds a bachelor of science in aviation technology with an emphasis in aviation management and a minor in business administration from the University of Alaska Anchorage. She also holds several human resources credentials (PHR & SHRM-CP).

Ts’aayeneekeelno holds a bachelor of arts in Japanese studies from Middlebury College. Most recently, she was a 2018 First Alaskans Institute Summer Intern in the Office of former-Governor Bill Walker and after was hired to stay on the team as a policy and program analyst and special assistant to Lieutenant Governor Valerie Davidson until the end of their term.

Cheryl Pitiksuq
Pitiksuq
Inside Alaska Business
First National Bank Alaska

First National Bank Alaska’s newly renamed Wealth Management department (previously Investment Management & Trust Services) offers customers a full spectrum of investment, asset, and trust management services for business and personal finances. The new name is meant to better reflect the bank’s global approach to helping Alaskans manage investable assets. fnbalaska.com

US Senate

The US Senate passed an appropriations package that includes $655 million dedicated to the design and construction of a new heavy polar security cutter; $20 million to acquire long lead-time materials for a second polar security cutter; and $400 million for offshore patrol cutters and $340 million for fast response cutters, six of which will be based in Alaska. Additionally, the bill provides $53 million for shore-side infrastructure facilities in Alaska to support the new cutters, with $22 million going to Kodiak and $31 million to Seward. senate.gov

Pebble Mine

The US Army Corps of Engineers released the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Pebble Project, a copper-gold-molybdenum porphyry project, which would include an open-pit mine and associated infrastructure. The public comment period on the Draft EIS began March 1 and will end May 30, 2019. Comments can be submitted online, through testimony at public meetings, or by mail. The Draft EIS and all contact information are available at pebbleprojecteis.com.

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand? Cowboy Up: John Smith Leads the Legendary Oklahoma State Wrestlers to Their Greatest Season Ever by Kim D. Parish: It’s about the legendary John Smith as a wrestler and as a coach and goes through the best season that John Smith had as the head coach of the Oklahoma State Cowboys wrestling team.
What movie do you recommend to everyone? Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby. If you’re not first, you’re last [he laughs].
What’s the first thing you do after work? Most of the time, I hurry up and get ready to go to wrestling practice [Dickinson is a wrestling coach].
If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live? Nowhere [he laughs]. I love Alaska. But I would probably say either Idaho or Western Montana.
If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be? A wolverine. They’re the most tenacious animal I know of—they never give up.

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand? Cowboy Up: John Smith Leads the Legendary Oklahoma State Wrestlers to Their Greatest Season Ever by Kim D. Parish: It’s about the legendary John Smith as a wrestler and as a coach and goes through the best season that John Smith had as the head coach of the Oklahoma State Cowboys wrestling team.
What movie do you recommend to everyone? Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby. If you’re not first, you’re last [he laughs].
What’s the first thing you do after work? Most of the time, I hurry up and get ready to go to wrestling practice [Dickinson is a wrestling coach].
If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live? Nowhere [he laughs]. I love Alaska. But I would probably say either Idaho or Western Montana.
If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be? A wolverine. They’re the most tenacious animal I know of—they never give up.

Off the Cuff

Pete Dickinson

P

ete and Tanya Dickinson founded All American Oilfield in 2010. In 2015, the company partnered with Chugach Alaska Corporation. Today the couple retains partial ownership, and Pete Dickinson is president of the company that provides oil and gas workover drilling operations, expertise in project management for oil and gas projects, and labor for operator-owned drilling and workover rigs.

Alaska Business: What do you do in your free time?
Pete Dickinson: I like to spend a lot of time with my family, and we do a lot of hunting and fishing.

AB: Is there a skill you’re currently developing or have always wanted to learn?
Dickinson: I’m always trying to learn better ways, or more effective ways, to motivate people—whether it’s in my wrestling coaching or it’s at work.

Alaska Trends

BP Energy Outlook
T

he BP Energy Outlook is produced to aid BP’s analysis and decision-making and is published as a contribution to the wider energy debate. But the Energy Outlook is only one source among many when considering the future of global energy markets. BP considers the scenarios in the Energy Outlook, together with a range of other analysis and information, when forming its long-term strategy.

  • In all the scenarios considered, world GDP more than doubles by 2040 driven by increasing prosperity in fast-growing developing economies.
  • Renewable energy is the fastest growing source of energy, contributing half of the growth in global energy supplies and becoming the largest source of power by 2040.
  • Natural gas grows robustly, supported by broad-based demand and the increasing availability of gas, aided by the continuing expansion of liquefied natural gas (LNG).
  • The Outlook considers a range of alternative scenarios, including the need for “more energy,” “less carbon,” and the possible impact of an escalation in trade disputes.
Thanks for reading our May 2019 issue!