Earthquakes? Fires?
Alaska’s engineers
have a plan
February 2019
Earthquakes? Fires?
Alaska’s engineers
have a plan
February 2019
February 2019 | Volume 35 | Number 2 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

It’s Your Data to Lose

Cyber disaster recovery planning is critical
By Tracy Barbour

Not-for-Profit, For-the-Economy

Mission-based organizations are economic drivers
By Tasha Anderson

Local Fabricators Still Fill Niche

Alaska‘s manufacturers provide specialized and short-term fabrication solutions
By Isaac Stone Simonell

High Function, Low Impact Air Services

Helicopters in Alaska’s industries
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Strategic Pathways

The University of Alaska’s path to even higher education
By Tasha Anderson

Health Wanted

Finding the next wave of Alaska’s life-savers
By Arie Henry

Playing Nicely Together

Tour operators work cooperatively to benefit travelers and each other
By Vanessa Orr
Alaska Railroad
Alaska Railroad
International Trade

Alaska’s Cargo Hub

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport serves the world
By Greg Wolf

Alaska and China

Ties between the Middle Kingdom and Great Land
By Greg Wolf

Large Funds with a Long View

Sovereign wealth funds are significant investors globally
By Greg Wolf

A Largely Untapped Market

India could represent 1.3 billion new customers
By Alex Salov

The Arctic Opportunity

Alaska: the commercial gateway to the American Arctic?
By Greg Wolf

Alaska’s Cargo Hub

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport serves the world
By Greg Wolf

Alaska and China

Ties between the Middle Kingdom and Great Land
By Greg Wolf

Large Funds with a Long View

Sovereign wealth funds are significant investors globally
By Greg Wolf

A Largely Untapped Market

India could represent 1.3 billion new customers
By Alex Salov

The Arctic Opportunity

Alaska: the commercial gateway to the American Arctic?
By Greg Wolf
About The Cover
Alaska Chapter of the National Association of Women Nominated by the Alaska Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction, 2018 Engineer of the Year Christine Ness is a fire protection engineer and project manager at PDC Engineers, an Alaska-based firm with five offices and more than one hundred employees. Ness always knew she wanted to be an engineer and, after moving here in 2013, found in Alaska the happy combination of her many loves: a brilliant husband, ample opportunities for solitary fishing excursions, and the ability to pursue her passion to make the world a little more fire resistant.

Thank you, Matson, for allowing us to use your Anchorage facility fire suppression systems as the backdrop for our cover and Q&A photos.

Cover Photo: Kerry Tasker
Cover Design: David Geiger
Volume 35, #2
Published by Alaska Business
Publishing Co. Anchorage, Alaska
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 editor@akbizmag.com
Associate Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 tanderson@akbizmag.com
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2906 ahenry@akbizmag.com
Art Director
David Geiger
257-2916 design@akbizmag.com
Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 production@akbizmag.com
Photo Contributor
Judy Patrick
BUSINESS STAFF
President
Billie Martin
VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 jason@akbizmag.com
VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 cbell@akbizmag.com
Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 janis@akbizmag.com
Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 cmerki@akbizmag.com
Accounting Manager
Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 accounts@akbizmag.com
Customer Service Representative
Emily Olsen
257-2914 emily@akbizmag.com
501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard,Suite 100 Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577
Toll Free: 1-800-770-4373
(907) 276-4373
www.akbizmag.com
Press releases: press@akbizmag.com
ALASKA BUSINESS PUBLISHING CO., INC.
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc.,
501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage,
Alaska 99503-2577;
Telephone: (907) 276-4373;
© 2019 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope.
One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $3.95 each; $4.95 for the October issue. Send subscription orders and address changes to circulation@akbizmag.com. To order back issues ($8.95 each including postage) visit www.akbizmag.com/store.

From the Editor

A Lesson Well-Learned
A

laska set a stunning example of resilience after the November 30 earthquake, thanks in part to lessons learned from the 1964 Good Friday earthquake that have held up for more than five decades (with a few additions here and there). As news outlets nationwide were lauding the state’s road crews for repairing a partially collapsed off-ramp connecting International Airport Road and Minnesota Drive in Anchorage by December 4—fewer than four full days after the temblor—Alaskans were doing what they do best, getting on with life.

Many retailers opened sections of the store they deemed safe the very next day, despite shelves askew, floors dotted with remnants of broken products, and limited staff. Utilities worked to get power and heat to Anchorage and Mat-Su Valley residents… and did so successfully for nearly the entire area the same day.

Kathryn Mackenzie
Managing Editor, Alaska Business

TELECOM & TECH

It’s Your Data to Lose

Cyber disaster recovery planning is critical
By Tracy Barbour
D

ata is the modern oil, says Danny Maxwell, PMP, ITIL. And it’s essential that organizations recognize its value, protect it—and anticipate that it will have to be recovered some day.

That’s why it’s vitally important for businesses to have a backup and recovery strategy and documented plan, says Maxwell, the Anchorage-based territory director with Structured Communications Systems. Headquartered in Clackamas, Oregon, Structured Communications Systems is an IT consultancy and multi-cloud services provider that partners with companies nationwide. “In our experience, it is not a question of ‘if’ you need a plan but rather ‘when’ you’ll need to execute a recovery,” Maxwell says. “Attacks, deleted or compromised data, broken communication lines, etc., are an unfortunate reality of doing business in today’s ‘connected’ world. The more proactive and prepared a business can be determines how fast and effective the recovery process is accomplished.”

Nonprofits
A Catholic Social
Services volunteer washes the feet of a Brother Francis Shelter guest.

Catholic Social Services

Not-for-Profit,
For-the-Economy
Mission-based organizations are economic drivers
By Tasha Anderson
I

n late October I was invited to visit Catholic Social Services as it hosted a small ceremony and reception to announce that Wells Fargo Housing Foundation had donated $100,000 to the Path to Independence program, “an initiative to quickly house individuals and families experiencing homelessness while working to ensure they remain housed and find long-term financial independence,” to quote myself in the November 1 edition of the Alaska Business Monitor.

I worked this event into my schedule for several reasons: Alaska Business, through our magazine and website, does occasionally spotlight philanthropic efforts, and this one in particular—which touched on housing issues (an ongoing problem for individuals and businesses alike) in Alaska—highlighted the way in which Alaska’s organizations are working together to solve problems to benefit the community. I saw it as a positive story about partnership, communication, housing, and business in Alaska. And it was.

Architecture & Engineering Special Section | Nominees
2019 Engineer of the Year Nominees
Amy Mestas

©Kevin Smith Photography

Amy Mestas
Amy K. Mestas, PE, SE, is a registered civil and structural engineer and PDC Engineers’ senior associate leading their structural engineering group. She has a BS and MS in civil engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Mestas serves on the board of the Structural Engineers Association of Alaska where she is the immediate past president, having held the positions of treasurer, vice-president, and president over the past five years. She also serves on the board for the Alaska Professional Design Council and is a member of several other industry organizations.

Architecture & Engineering Special Section | Ness Profile

© Kerry Tasker

Architecture & Engineering Special Section | Ness Profile

© Kerry Tasker

2018 Engineer of the Year Christine Ness
C

hristine Ness is a fire protection engineer and project manager at PDC Engineers in the company’s Anchorage office. She earned a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from Bradley University in Illinois and studied fire protection engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachussetts. She earned her Alaska FPE PE in May of 2014, and today uses her expertise in facility life safety hazard analysis and fire suppression and detection systems design to keep facilities and people safe throughout Alaska and beyond. Nominated by the Alaska Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction, Ness was named the 2018 Engineer of the Year during E-Week last February. Alaska Business is pleased to share a little more about this exceptional woman and her vital work below.

Architecture & Engineering Special Section | Projects

UAF Engineering Learning & Innovation Facility.

© Ken Graham | AMC Engineers

Architecture & Engineering Special Section | Projects

UAF Engineering Learning & Innovation Facility.

© Ken Graham | AMC Engineers

Discovering Excellence in Engineering
2019 Project of the Year Submissions
W

e are proud to once again present a glimpse at this year’s Engineering Excellence Project of the Year Awards. The winners of this esteemed award will be announced during Engineer’s Week 2019 occurring February 17 through 23. Congratulations to all the nominees.

AMC Engineers—Engineering Learning and Innovation Facility
The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) opened its new Engineering Learning and Innovation Facility for the Spring 2018 Semester. This contemporary, 119,000-square-foot, $121.6 million facility is situated and forms a connection between two existing buildings.

The facility’s design begins with a high performance building envelope, specifically designed for the Southcentral Alaska climate. Window placement, skylights, glass walls, and sophisticated lighting and lighting controls create a high energy vibrant feel in a place where natural sunlight is scarce much of the school year.

Architecture & Engineering Special Section | Interiors
Architecture & Engineering Special Section | Interiors
From Open Floors to Enclaves
As more workplaces switch to a flexible and open office concept, it’s not uncommon to see smaller workspaces. In some cases, the traditional 80-square-foot workstation is switching to a 60-square-foot space.

Stantec

From Open Floors to Enclaves
Office interiors adapt to changing times
By Vanessa Orr
W

hen it comes to office design, taste is subjective. But one thing that most business owners, architects, and interior designers tend to agree on is that today’s offices need to be adaptable.

“Office space has become more fluid and agile over the years; for example, while a formal conference room may still be a requirement, it might now feature divider walls that allow the bigger space to be divided into two spaces,” says Stantec Associate Jessica Cederberg. “The furniture is also mobile; it may be stackable and movable, which makes it easier to adjust for larger or smaller groups.”

Architecture & Engineering Special Section |Directory
The Alaska
Business
2019
Architecture
& Engineering
Directory
Architecture & Engineering Special Section |Directory
The Alaska
Business
2019
Architecture
& Engineering
Directory
Company
Top Executive
Year Founded/ Established in Alaska
Worldwide/ Alaska Employees
Social Media & Business Description
Company
AECOM

700 G St., Suite 500
Anchorage, AK 99501
Phone: 907-562-3366

Top Executive

Laura Young, AK Ops Mgr.

Year Founded/ Established in Alaska

1904
1948

Worldwide/ Alaska Employees

92,000
50

Social Media & Business Description

aecom.com
AECOM Alaska is a team of engineers, scientists, planners, and support staff providing Arctic-smart engineering and environmental services for the complete project life-cycle from permitting for air, water, soils, and solid waste to planning, design, and construction through production and site closure.

Company
aeSolutions

3800 Centerpoint Dr., Suite 620
Anchorage, AK 99503
Phone: 907-865-5992

Top Executive

Chris Hickling, AK Bus. Dev. Mgr

Year Founded/ Established in Alaska

1998
2008

Worldwide/ Alaska Employees

156
26

Social Media & Business Description

aecom.com | info@aesolns.com | aesolutions | aesolns | aesolutions
aeSolutions is a complete system integrator specializing in safety instrumented systems, automation, process safety consulting, industrial cybersecurity, alarm management, and operations and maintenance solutions; supporting all phases of the Process Safety Lifecycle.

Oil & Gas
Oil & Gas Special Section
Workers build and install entrance stairs and a landing for a camp on the North Slope.

GBR Oilfield Services

Local Fabricators Still Fill Niche
Alaska‘s manufacturers provide specialized and short-term fabrication solutions
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
A

laska companies vying for oil and gas company contracts to fabricate custom objects and supply materials to the state’s most dominant industry faced increased competition from the Lower 48 after the oil market took a dive several years ago. “The oil market dictates a lot of what happens on the North Slope. Over the last several years, we saw a lot of projects get put on hold or canceled altogether,” says Jim Wohlers, general manager for GBR Oilfield Services.

“With the drop in demand came the willingness of some of the larger, out-of-state companies to take on work at much lower rates. Over the past six months, we have seen a gradual increase in projects and work on the North Slope. In addition, over the past several years, we have seen a steady increase in the importance of safety across the field,” he says.

Transportation
Transportation
“Our goal is to be ready for when the oil and gas resurgence occurs and continue to partner with the oil and gas companies who are investing in Alaska… We’re waiting for those remote outlier areas to open up, because that’s when we’re going to see a big renaissance of helicopter services on the North Slope.”
—Chris Maynard, Vice President/Director of Sales
Pathfinder Aviation
A helicopter approaches an oil rig. One of the main uses for helicopters on oil rigs is crew transfers.

Pathfinder Aviation

High Function, Low Impact Air Services
Helicopters in Alaska’s industries
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
H

elicopter services fill a specific need in Alaska’s extraction industries. The mining and oil and gas industries rely on rotary-winged aircraft for everything from site testing to crew changeovers in the vast, remote areas in which these industries operate.

With many of the large, legacy helicopter operators based Outside leaving the state to seek higher returns in the last ten years, Alaska’s helicopter services are now dominated by mid- and small-sized operators, explains Chris Maynard, the vice president and director of sales for Pathfinder Aviation.

International Trade Special Section | Airport

Alaska’s
Cargo Hub

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport serves the world
By Greg Wolf
Greg Wolf has been the executive director of the World Trade Center in Anchorage since 2002; he previously served as the State of Alaska’s director of international trade and market development and was the vice president of oversees projects for AEDC.
International Trade Special Section | Airport
Alaska’s Cargo Hub
Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport serves the world
By Greg Wolf
Greg Wolf has been the executive director of the World Trade Center in Anchorage since 2002; he previously served as the State of Alaska’s director of international trade and market development and was the vice president of oversees projects for AEDC.
W

hile some living in the Lower 48 may think Anchorage is at the end of the world, in reality the city is located right in the middle of the world. At least, so far as the aviation business is concerned. The commercial aviation industry has extensive air cargo operations that they perform at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport on a daily basis.

Situated at the top of the world and near equidistance between Europe, Asia, and North America, the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport is less than ten hours by air to 95 percent of major global markets. It serves as the primary link between cities in Asia and North America, as approximately 80 percent of all cargo flights operating across the Pacific make a “technical stop” at Anchorage to refuel, change crews, and (in some cases) to transfer cargo. It is why major integrator airlines like FedEx, UPS, and DHL all have a significant presence at the airport in support of their growing international cargo operations.

International Trade Special Section | China
Alaska and China
Ties between the Middle Kingdom and Great Land
By Greg Wolf
C

hina is the world’s largest importer of natural resource commodities, and Alaska is a major American producer and exporter of many of those commodities, so the growing commercial ties between the Middle Kingdom and the Great Land make for a natural, mutually beneficial trading partnership. And, indeed, the dramatic growth of China as an economic powerhouse has fueled continued expansion of Alaska’s international trade economy and has been the headline story for the state’s export community for the past two decades.

International Trade Special Section | Sovereign Wealth
Large Funds with a Long View
Sovereign wealth funds are significant investors globally
By Greg Wolf
S

tate-sponsored investment funds, better known as sovereign wealth funds, continue to rise in economic clout as their assets under management continues to grow and they deploy funds into a broader range of investments. While these government-controlled investment vehicles vary considerably in size and scope, as well as by their particular investment strategies and policies, they are a significant force in the financial markets and their impact can be felt in all corners of the world, including Alaska.

International Trade Special Section | Emerging Market
A Largely Untapped Market
India could represent 1.3 billion new customers
By Alex Salov
Alex Salov is the business operations manager of World Trade Center Anchorage and has been working at the center since 2004; he holds a master’s degree in global supply chain management from the University of Alaska Anchorage.
W

hat comes to mind when someone hears the word “India”? A large country located very far from Alaska. A very populous country home to millions of poor farm workers. At the same time, India also home to millions of highly skilled IT professionals. Many college students encounter professors from India who teach a spread of subjects at major American universities. And last but not least, the Taj Mahal is a major travel destination for many Western tourists. The above statements paint a multifaceted image of India.

International Trade Special Section | Arctic Update
The Arctic Opportunity
Alaska: the commercial gateway to the American Arctic?
By Greg Wolf
A

s the world increasingly turns its eyes northward to the potential of the Arctic, Alaska finds itself uniquely positioned to play a leading role to serve as a gateway and forward base of operations for commercial development in the region. More so than any other state, Alaska has the opportunity to benefit from the economic activity that transpires in the American Arctic. The Arctic opportunity is literally in Alaska’s backyard.

Geography doesn’t always deal the best hand; it can, after all, be a curse or a blessing. For Alaska, perched at the top of the world, its location has often worked to its advantage.

Education
UA system nursing programs are led out of the University of Alaska Anchorage but are available statewide throughout the system.

University of Alaska

Strategic Pathways
The University of Alaska’s path to even higher education
By Tasha Anderson
I

n 2016 the University of Alaska (UA) launched Strategic Pathways, a plan to “maximize value to Alaska through excellent, accessible, and cost-effective higher education.” An early draft was published in February 2016, and three years later UA has made significant strides in pursuing its goals.

Progress with Pathways
According to UA President Jim Johnsen, “Many of the decisions resulting from the Strategic Pathways process have been implemented or are in the implementation process.” For example, within the UA system there used to be three schools of management, but now there are two; there were several procurement processes that have been streamlined into one; multiple email platforms have been turned into one; and several grants and contracting processes have been simplified to one.

Healthcare

UAA School of Nursing student Krysta Byford goes over treatment plans with actor Danny Ashton Earll as he portrays a patient about to be discharged during a simulated patient care scenario in UAA’s Health Sciences Building Simulation Center.

UAA College of Health

Health Wanted
Finding the next wave of Alaska’s life-savers

By Arie Henry

I

t’s no revelation that the healthcare industry is experiencing an economic boon in the Last Frontier. Indeed, Alaska boasts the best average wages for several healthcare positions, including optometrists, pharmacists, dental hygienists, and general technologists and technicians. Healthcare employment has recently seen consistent increases—not many sectors in Alaska are seeing that trend. What isn’t common knowledge, however, is the process involved in filling the positions that fuel the growing demand for jobs.

Healthcare

Health Wanted
Finding the next wave of Alaska’s life-savers

By Arie Henry

I

t’s no revelation that the healthcare industry is experiencing an economic boon in the Last Frontier. Indeed, Alaska boasts the best average wages for several healthcare positions, including optometrists, pharmacists, dental hygienists, and general technologists and technicians. Healthcare employment has recently seen consistent increases—not many sectors in Alaska are seeing that trend. What isn’t common knowledge, however, is the process involved in filling the positions that fuel the growing demand for jobs.

Tourism
Playing Nicely Together
Tour operators work cooperatively to benefit travelers and each other
By Vanessa Orr
C

ompanies in the tourism industry often work together to provide the best experience for those visiting the Last Frontier. And while this form of cooperative tourism may seem counterintuitive since many of them are competing for the same tourist dollar, such relationships actually benefit all of the parties involved—including the state itself.

“Alaska in particular is a unique destination, and everyone in the industry wants the destination to succeed because a rising tide lifts all ships,” explains Jillian Simpson, vice president of the Alaska Travel Industry Association (ATIA).

Great Alaskan Holidays’ goal is to provide customers with an amazing experience while also supporting the state’s tourism industry, so they partner with companies ranging from flying services to fishing guides.

© Charlie Sears

Tourism
Playing Nicely Together
Tour operators work cooperatively to benefit travelers and each other
By Vanessa Orr
C

ompanies in the tourism industry often work together to provide the best experience for those visiting the Last Frontier. And while this form of cooperative tourism may seem counterintuitive since many of them are competing for the same tourist dollar, such relationships actually benefit all of the parties involved—including the state itself.

MEET LOCAL MEATS

MEET LOCAL MEATS

Fresh and Custom Protein
S

mall business owners around the state provide local meat options, whether through raising animals in Alaska or processing game meats and fish sourced in the Last Frontier. Below is a range of butchers, wholesalers, and game processors to help you get your meat fix.

Family-owned Indian Valley Meats, located in Indian, has been a custom processor of fish and exotic meats since 1976 and, according to the company, is “one of the largest processors of game meat in North America.”

The cost for fish processing is by pound or by can, and options include smoked, vacuum packing, canned, jerky, or frozen. Processing game is also priced per pound and can include moose, buffalo, caribou, goat, sheep, deer, or pig. indianvalleymeats.com

Events Calendar
Events Calendar
Fairbanks
FEB-MAR
14-31
World Ice Art Championships
This family-friendly event, produced by the World ICE Association, features interactive ice sculptures, multiple ice slides, and ice art exhibitions created by a multitude of artists, all at the Tanana Valley State Fairgrounds. www.icealaska.com/welcome/
Anchorage
FEB
9
APWA Gala: An Evening of Exploration
Hosted by the Anchorage Petroleum Women’s Association, this gala raises funds for Alaska Resource Education and includes a reception, dinner, silent and live auctions, and live music performed by Chill Factor at the Anchorage Marriott Downtown from 6 p.m. to Midnight. ancpwa.org
FEB
13-23
Iron Dog
Iron Dog is the longest, toughest snowmobile race in the world, running from Big Lake to Nome and finishing on the Chena River in downtown Fairbanks. Race events include the Donlin Gold Safety Expo in the valley on February 15 and the Halfway Ceremonies in Nome on February 20. The Pro Class start is February 17 in Big Lake. irondog.org
Homer
FEB
9
Homer Winter Carnival
This is a weekend event of outdoor activities and fun for the whole family, including a parade, community dances, an outhouse race, wedding expo, hockey tournament, Mr. Homer pageant, arts and crafts, and lots of food. This year’s carnival is celebrating the US Coast Guard’s 50th Anniversary in Homer with the theme “Coasting through Winter.” homeralaska.org
Ketchikan
JAN-FEB
31-2
Circus of Curiosities
This is the 33rd annual Wearable Art Show in Ketchikan, taking place at the Ted Ferry Civic Center. Artists in the Ketchikan community and beyond create original wearable wonders out of duct tape, foam, sequins, trash bags, wood, milk jugs—and lots of glue. The artwork comes alive modeled on the runway to music: fashion, sculpture, engineering, theatrics, dance, and music in one performance. ketchikanarts.org
Business Events
February
February 6-9
Anchorage AEYC Early Childhood Conference
Hilton Anchorage: This year’s keynote speaker is Cate Heroman, author of Making & Tinkering with STEM, who will conduct workshops on Friday and Saturday. anchorageaeyc.org
February 8-10
Alaska Pharmacists Association Convention & Tradeshow
Sheraton Anchorage: The Alaska Pharmacists Association is a 501(c)(6) nonprofit organization serving pharmacists, technicians, associates, and students. alaskapharmacy.org
February 25-27
Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference
Hilton Anchorage: The Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference (ASSEC) is committed to providing high quality professional development relevant to the cultural, rural, and remote characteristics of Alaska. assec.org
February 26-28
TWS Alaska Chapter Annual Meeting
Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall, Juneau: This is the annual meeting of the Alaska Chapter of The Wildlife Society and brings together wildlife researchers, managers, educators, students, and administrators. twsalaskameeting.com
Right Moves
United Way
Veteran social worker and educator Sonya Hunte joined United Way of Anchorage as Vice President for Education Impact. Hunte will oversee United Way’s 90% Graduation by 2020 initiative. She earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Penn State University and a master’s in clinical social work from Boston College.
Hunte
Stantec
Tom Garrett, PE, joined Stantec as a Senior Civil Engineer in the firm’s transportation group in Anchorage. Garrett’s project design experience includes site development, road reconstruction and resurfacing, grading and drainage plans, retaining wall design, and utility main extensions. Garrett holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Alaska Anchorage and is a member of the Institute of Transportation Engineers.
Garrett
Inside Alaska Business
UAF
The University of Alaska Fairbanks has become the fourth university in the nation to earn the Quality Matters’ Online Learner Support Certification.

Quality Matters is an international, US-based nonprofit organization that is recognized as a leader in quality assurance for online education. The Online Learner Support Certification recognizes programs that provide all the critical student and academic services needed for learner success and that use learner feedback to continuously improve those services.

The Quality Matters review team was particularly impressed with the tech support available and the high satisfaction ratings it got from online students, the programs in place to help students succeed academically, and the variety of ways UAF accepts student feedback, among other things.

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?
12 Rules for Life: An Antidote for Chaos by Jordan B. Peterson and Boomtown: The Fantastical Saga of Oklahoma City by Sam Anderson. I’m usually reading two books at a time.

What movie do you recommend to everyone you know? In Harm’s Way – best John Wayne movie ever!

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work? Kiss my wife Nicole and ask her how her day was.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska what’s your dream locale? Buffalo, Wyoming.

If you could domesticate a wild animal what animal would it be? Mountain lion.

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?
12 Rules for Life: An Antidote for Chaos by Jordan B. Peterson and Boomtown: The Fantastical Saga of Oklahoma City by Sam Anderson. I’m usually reading two books at a time.

What movie do you recommend to everyone you know? In Harm’s Way – best John Wayne movie ever!

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work? Kiss my wife Nicole and ask her how her day was.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska what’s your dream locale? Buffalo, Wyoming.

If you could domesticate a wild animal what animal would it be? Mountain lion.

Off the Cuff

Bill Popp
B

ill Popp has spent more than forty years in both the Alaska private and public sectors. As President and CEO of the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation (AEDC) since 2007, he plans the strategic direction in marketing Anchorage and Alaska to companies and global industries considering Anchorage as a place in which to conduct business and assists local businesses seeking to expand both within Anchorage and Alaska as well as Lower 48 and international markets. Popp is currently chair of the 49th State Angel Fund Business Advisory Committee. And he’s the latest Alaska Business Off the Cuff participant.

Alaska Trends

Free Trade in the
49th State
T

hough many consider Alaska to literally be the Last Frontier, it is in fact a super hub of import and export activity. In 2017 Alaska exported nearly $5 billion in goods to destinations worldwide. Its top five export markets are China, Japan, Canada, Korea, and Germany. Its top five exports are seafood, minerals and ores, petroleum and coal products, transportation equipment, and oil and gas.

Thanks for reading our February 2019 issue!