Alaska Business
Alaska Business
October 2019
Announcing the New Anchorage Service Center
Brand New 54,000 Square Foot State-of-the-art Facility
Increased Capacity with an 83 Door Cross-Dock Terminal
We’re Committed to Alaska
October 2019 | Volume 35 | Number 10 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Staying a Step Ahead

Why continuing education is a smart investment
By Vanessa Orr

Calling All Civilians

JBER, Eielson recruiting for hundreds of job openings—no enlistment necessary
By Brad Joyal

Safe Travels

Insurance provides peace of mind for vacationers
By Tracy Barbour

Lights, Camera, Actionables

Digital video marketing evolves from novel to necessary
By Arie Henry

Breaking Boundaries

A celebration of Alaska-grown, top-earning companies
By Tracy Barbour

Getting Goods Around the Globe

The ins and outs of international imports and exports
By Vanessa Orr
All Hands on Deck

All Hands on Deck

Naval architecture and marine engineering require communication and collaboration
By Brad Joyal

Oil Season

The industry prepares for winter drilling
By Amy Newman

About The Cover

Alaska Business Magazine October 2019 Cover It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s the Top 49 Alaskan-owned companies ranked by gross revenue! Which, actually, wouldn’t look much like a bird or a plane at all. Certainly they fly in some circumstances, but their facilities are generally grounded and their employees are people-shaped… but we digress. A Top 49er is actually easy to spot—just look for companies that are committed to quality, pillars in the community, and radiating success. We simply cannot use enough exclamation points to describe how over the moon (in a stolen rocket, launched from our underground lair) we are to celebrate the daring escapades of our 2019 Top 49ers!
Cover Art by Monica Sterchi-Lowman
Oil Season

Oil Season

The industry prepares for winter drilling
By Amy Newman

Staying a Step Ahead

Why continuing education is a smart investment
By Vanessa Orr

Calling All Civilians

JBER, Eielson recruiting for hundreds of job openings—no enlistment necessary
By Brad Joyal

Safe Travels

Insurance provides peace of mind for vacationers
By Tracy Barbour

Lights, Camera, Actionables

Digital video marketing evolves from novel to necessary
By Arie Henry

Breaking Boundaries

A celebration of Alaska-grown, top-earning companies
By Tracy Barbour

Getting Goods Around the Globe

The ins and outs of international imports and exports
By Vanessa Orr
All Hands on Deck

All Hands on Deck

Naval architecture and marine engineering require communication and collaboration
By Brad Joyal

About The Cover

Alaska Business Magazine October 2019 Cover It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s the Top 49 Alaskan-owned companies ranked by gross revenue! Which, actually, wouldn’t look much like a bird or a plane at all. Certainly they fly in some circumstances, but their facilities are generally grounded and their employees are people-shaped… but we digress. A Top 49er is actually easy to spot—just look for companies that are committed to quality, pillars in the community, and radiating success. We simply cannot use enough exclamation points to describe how over the moon (in a stolen rocket, launched from our underground lair) we are to celebrate the daring escapades of our 2019 Top 49ers!
Cover Art by Monica Sterchi-Lowman

Top 49ers Special Section

Choggiung Makes a Striking 49er Debut

A new CEO and a significant acquisition lead to positive momentum
Choggiung Makes a Striking 49er Debut
Choggiung Makes a Striking 49er Debut

A new CEO and a significant acquisition lead to positive momentum
A Family Affair

Watterson Construction: thriving in Alaska since 1981
Epic Earnings

Decades of Top 49er history
By Tasha Anderson
The 2019 Top 49ers Unmasked

Directory of 2019 Top 49ers
Tyonek Native Corporation—Defined by Quality, Dedicated People

CEO Leo Barlow helps lead the company to “unprecedented, rapid growth”
A Family Affair
A Family Affair

Watterson Construction: thriving in Alaska since 1981
Epic Earnings

Decades of Top 49er history
By Tasha Anderson
The 2019 Top 49ers Unmasked

Directory of 2019 Top 49ers
Tyonek Native Corporation—Defined by Quality, Dedicated People
Tyonek Native Corporation—Defined by Quality, Dedicated People

CEO Leo Barlow helps lead the company to “unprecedented, rapid growth”
Volume 35, #10
Published by Alaska Business
Publishing Co. Anchorage, Alaska
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 [email protected]
Associate/Web Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2906 [email protected]
Art Director
Monica Sterchi-Lowman
257-2916 [email protected]
Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 [email protected]
Photo Contributor
Judy Patrick
BUSINESS STAFF
President
Billie Martin
VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 [email protected]
VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 [email protected]
Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 [email protected]
Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 [email protected]
Accounting Manager
Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 [email protected]
Customer Service Representative
Emily Olsen
257-2914 [email protected]
501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100 Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577
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Press releases: [email protected]
ALASKA BUSINESS PUBLISHING CO., INC.
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc., 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373; © 2019 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & October issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.

From the Editor

Teamwork—It’s a Thing
I

‘ve been an editor for more than twenty years. I’ve edited just about everything one can imagine (seriously) and never have I been as excited about a magazine issue as I am about this issue of Alaska Business. It’s not just because it contains our annual Top 49ers special section or because, as a group, the Top 49ers reported more than $17 billion in 2018 revenue (which is the highest group total in Top 49ers history), or even that I’m in love with this year’s theme: Meanwhile in Corporateville…

It’s the amount of teamwork that went into this issue that has me saying, “Zoinks!”

Every person at Alaska Business contributed to this issue in one way or another. Each year the entire team comes up with some good, some terrible, some hilarious ideas for our Top 49ers theme; after we rip them apart and poke fun at each other, we eventually get serious and vote on our favorite. This year we chose to lighten the economic mood by celebrating the companies on the list with a pop-art, comic-book-style theme. In an impressive (some may say heroic) showing, our brand new Art Director Majestic Monica took the idea, worked fearlessly into the night, and brought the team’s idea to life.

Kathryn Mackenzie

Kathryn Mackenzie
Managing Editor, Alaska Business

Education
Blythe Campbell educates HR professionals on effective communication strategies at a presentation provided by the Anchorage Society for Human Resource Management.

ASHRM

Education
Blythe Campbell educates HR professionals on effective communication strategies at a presentation provided by the Anchorage Society for Human Resource Management.

ASHRM

Staying a Step Ahead
Why continuing education is a smart investment
By Vanessa Orr
I

n many industries, continuing education is a must in order to keep up with the latest rules and regulations and technological advancements. But finding the time and the money to send employees to these classes isn’t always a priority for businesses that are already stretched thin.

“For employers and employees, taking time out of a busy day is a burden; these days, everyone is doing more with less,” explains Anchorage Society for Human Resource Management (ASHRM) President Patty Hickok, who also serves as the membership and workforce readiness director for the Alaska SHRM State Council. “But businesses and individuals need to look at the time and cost spent on continuing education as an investment. In the human resources field, or in any field, things are changing so rapidly that employees must continue lifelong learning or get left behind. In today’s job market, the only constant is change.”

Government
Calling All
Civilians
JBER, Eielson recruiting for hundreds of job openings—no enlistment necessary
By Brad Joyal
Government
Calling All
Civilians
JBER, Eielson recruiting for hundreds of job openings—no enlistment necessary
By Brad Joyal
A

laska’s military bases are looking to make new hires at a rapid pace. Between Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s (JBER) influx of non-appropriated funds (NAF) jobs and Civilian Personnel openings and Eielson Air Force Base’s available jobs tied to the new F-35 beddown, there are hundreds of military jobs available throughout the state. And many of them don’t require any affiliation with the military.

In July, JBER’s public affairs office issued a news release in which human resource directors estimated there are roughly 330 positions to fill between its NAF jobs—which are positions that don’t require approval from Congress—and additional openings in the Civilian Personnel office.

Although the open positions at JBER involve working on the base, the bulk of them are entry-level positions that welcome civilians even if they have little knowledge about military operations.

Insurance
LifeMed Alaska helicopter.

LifeMed Alaska

Insurance
LifeMed Alaska helicopter.

LifeMed Alaska

Safe Travels
Insurance provides peace of mind for vacationers
By Tracy Barbour
W

hether it’s for a weekend getaway, exhilarating cruise, or extended adventure to Alaska, travel insurance can help vacationers protect their trip investment. Travel insurance can cover a myriad of potential calamities, from lost luggage and travel interruption/cancellation to health emergencies and even accidental death.

There are a multitude of real-life situations in which vacation insurance becomes crucial. For example, if someone loses a piece of luggage containing important medications, travel insurance coverage assists with finding the bag or even filling an emergency prescription. Or say an extended family has been planning a big, annual reunion for months. But right before the event, a key family member gets too sick to go, and everyone decides to cancel. Travel insurance helps people get reimbursed for non-refundable deposits, pre-payments, and other covered expenses.

Media & Arts
A camera drone takes to the air during a Yuit video shoot in June at JAXPORT in Jacksonville, Florida.

Yuit Communications

Media & Arts
A camera drone takes to the air during a Yuit video shoot in June at JAXPORT in Jacksonville, Florida.

Yuit Communications

Lights, Camera, Actionables
Digital video marketing evolves from novel to necessary
By Arie Henry
M

arketing brains know the “age of digital content” is now and has been going strong for a number of years. Digital content marketing has evolved from novel to necessary for startups and billion-dollar corporations alike. In fact, a common adage in the field is the phrase “content is king.” If that’s the case, video content is undoubtedly the supreme ruler of the land.

Cisco’s Visual Networking Index projects consumer video traffic to comprise 82 percent of all online traffic by 2021. Marketing tech company Unruly calculates that about 18 percent of internet users share videos on social networks at least once a week and that 61 percent of American Facebook users share video advertisements specifically.

Finance
Finance
Breaking Boundaries
A celebration of Alaska-grown, top-earning companies
By Tracy Barbour
S

ome of Alaska’s most ambitious start-ups are now among the top-earning companies in the state. The following are examples of top-producing entities that originated in Alaska and have expanded beyond its borders to serve a broad base of customers.

Alaska USA

Alaska USA Federal Credit Union is one of the longest-standing home-grown entities in Alaska. It was established on December 6, 1948, when fifteen civil service personnel gathered in Anchorage’s Alaska Air Depot pooled their savings—and their conviction in one another—to form a member-owned credit union. “This decision was made in order to provide financial services to the personnel who had been recently transferred to Alaska,” says Senior Vice President of Corporate Relations Dan McCue. “Members began extending credit to one another while volunteering their time to operate the credit union.”

top 49ers special section
Alaska Business has been publishing a Top 49ers list since 1985, our first year of operation, though at the time the list was branded as “The New 49ers.”

Cover design by Judy Clark Hartwig

top 49ers special section
Alaska Business has been publishing a Top 49ers list since 1985, our first year of operation, though at the time the list was branded as “The New 49ers.”

Cover design by Judy Clark Hartwig

Epic Earnings
Decades of Top 49er history
By Tasha Anderson
General Manager Jason Martin crashed his way into my office about a fortnight ago, frothing at the mouth and waving a sheaf of printed spreadsheets. “Anderson!” he spluttered, slamming his hammy fists on my desk, knocking pens and crusty coffee cups onto the floor. “What in tarnation is going on here?”

Wiping some spittle off my face, I took a quick peek at the papers still crushed in his grasp, praying to catch a glance of a word or a number I could extrapolate into an answer that might send him packing. “Top 49ers” and “1998” flashed in my view, and I quickly stifled a sigh of relief. “Of course, Mr. Martin,” I said, sweet as grandma’s cookies. “That’s historic Top 49ers data.”

top 49ers special section
The 2019 Top 49ers Unmasked
The 2019 Alaska Business Top 49ers rankings are official, ironclad, etched in stone, locked in—and not a minute too soon as we can’t wait to take a closer look at the Last Frontier’s top earning, Alaskan-owned companies.

Topping the list (and there’s no need to sit down for this, it’s not surprising) is Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; what may knock you out of your easy chair (if you did sit) is that the company increased its revenue by a whopping 23 percent year over year, reporting a skyscraping $3.4 billion in revenue for 2018.

In fact, the top eight of the Top 49ers all managed (very possibly with the aid of grappling hooks and anti-gravity boots) to hold onto their rankings this year from last year.

top 49ers special section
Meanwhile in Corporateville…
Heroism Abounds
W

hat is a heroic trait? It depends on who you ask. Ask a teenager and the answer will more than likely be x-ray vision or flying. Ask a fully-grown adult and the answer will still more than likely be x-ray vision or flying.

But in a more broad (and reality-based) sense, the definition of a hero is one who goes above and beyond the norm to help others. This certainly holds true among the 2019 Top 49ers—they made the list because of their ability to garner revenue in even the toughest of financial environments, but their true power and value lies in their super-sized philanthropic abilities.

top 49ers special section
Choggiung Makes a Striking 49er Debut
A new CEO and a significant acquisition lead to positive momentum
©Arie Henry | Alaska Business
top 49ers special section
©Arie Henry | Alaska Business
Choggiung Makes a Striking 49er Debut
A new CEO and a significant acquisition lead to positive momentum
T

his year is the debut of Top 49er Choggiung Limited, the ANCSA village corporation for Dillingham. The corporation reported 2018 revenue of more than $95 million, propelling it to number thirty-five in the rankings. The last two years for Choggiung have been full of positive changes, including the addition of a new CEO, a significant acquisition, and positive movement throughout its business holdings.

Positioning for Growth

Cameron Poindexter joined Choggiung in July of 2017 as the company’s president and CEO. He’s a Choggiung shareholder who was born and raised in Homer and Anchor Point, where his parents owned a small business, “so I gained interest in business just from the very start, working and living in an entrepreneurial family,” he says. Poindexter’s upbringing led to his decision to study business, and he earned his undergraduate degree in business management from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and MBA from the University of Alaska Anchorage.

top 49ers special section
Tyonek Native Corporation—Defined by Quality, Dedicated People
CEO Leo Barlow helps lead the company to “unprecedented, rapid growth”

Tyonek Services Group employees perform maintenance on an aircraft at the company’s hangar facility in Mississippi.

©Ginger Zolynsky

top 49ers special section
Tyonek Services Group employees perform maintenance on an aircraft at the company’s hangar facility in Mississippi.

©Ginger Zolynsky

Tyonek Native Corporation—Defined by Quality, Dedicated People
CEO Leo Barlow helps lead the company to “unprecedented, rapid growth”
L

ast year was one of outstanding growth for Tyonek Native Corporation (TNC), which saw its revenue increase 85 percent from 2017, reporting 2018 revenue of more than $144 million. This boosted TNC up twelve spots in our Top 49ers ranks, landing them at number 25. “We’ve had pretty unprecedented, rapid growth,” says CEO Leo Barlow. “We’ve been fortunate and successfully bid a number of contracts with the US government, and in some cases we’re a preferred provider for a number of our customers.”

Barlow stepped into his role as CEO in 2016, and at the same time a new management team took the reins at TNC. “Frankly speaking, the company had strayed from its core business of government defense contracting into more commercial activity. So we brought it back together and refocused our strategies on what we were successful at, reaffirming our relationships with the US government and defense contracting personnel,” Barlow says.

top 49ers special section
On March 29, Eielson broke ground for the F-35A Lightning II flight simulator facility, which marked the beginning of improvements to the base’s infrastructure in order to house the new aircraft. Bill Watterson, then-president of Watterson Construction, is on the right.

©Airman Eric M. Fisher | US Air Force

top 49ers special section
On March 29, Eielson broke ground for the F-35A Lightning II flight simulator facility, which marked the beginning of improvements to the base’s infrastructure in order to house the new aircraft. Bill Watterson, then-president of Watterson Construction, is on the right.

©Airman Eric M. Fisher | US Air Force

A Family Affair
Watterson Construction: thriving in Alaska since 1981
B

ill and Helga Watterson founded Watterson Construction in Anchorage in 1981. Sixteen years later in 1997, Watterson Construction debuted as an Alaska Business Top 49er, reporting revenue of nearly $27 million in 1996. With the exception of 1998, Watterson Construction has been a Top 49er every year since. While the company has moved up and down the list, Watterson Construction has consistently found itself in the ranks of Alaska’s top earning, Alaskan-owned businesses.

This year Watterson Construction is once again climbing up, jumping 13 places to the number 35 spot, reporting more than $85 million in 2018 revenue. That’s more than double the revenue the company reported for 2017, much of which can be attributed to federal spending on construction in the Interior. Watterson Construction is one of the many companies that have secured contracts related to the F-35 beddown at Eielson Air Force Base.

ALPHABETICAL LISTING, 5-YEAR RANK & REVENUE OF CORPORATEVILLE’S TOP 49ERS
Company Rank
2019
2018
Revenue
Rank
2018
2017
Revenue
Rank
2017
2016
Revenue
Rank
2016
2015
Revenue
Rank
2015
2014
Revenue
Afognak Native Corporation 7 $643,686,000 7 $608,104,000 8 $474,271,000 8 $457,569,000 7 $505,346,000
Ahtna, Inc. 14 $284,400,000 16 $238,000,000 16 $217,700,000 18 $188,400,000 18 $185,000,000
Airport Equipment Rentals 47 $55,900,000 45 $55,100,000 44 $54,361,000 39 $75,624,000 44 $63,212,586
Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Inc. 48 $52,400,000 47 $46,500,000 49 49,500,000 - - - -
Aleut Corporation 16 $252,293,053 19 $211,837,206 20 $171,655,823 28 $137,942,098 28 $120,307,293
Anchorage Chrysler Dodge Center 37 $77,738,867 32 $90,546,881 36 79,853,962 30 $89,313,811 30 $97,752,543
Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 1 $3,396,783,000 1 $2,697,862,000 1 $2,371,164,000 1 $2,515,377,000 1 $2,663,540,000
Bering Straits Native Corporation 12 $415,000,000 11 $357,900,000 10 $326,000,000 11 $304,404,000 12 $229,482,000
Bethel Native Corporation 23 $153,715,435 29 $99,197,518 37 $71,771,183 45 54,275,351 - -
Bristol Bay Native Corporation 2 $1,689,014,000 2 $1,659,345,000 2 $1,525,181,000 3 $1,512,022,000 2 $1,736,084,000
Calista Corporation 8 $575,474,000 8 $480,200,000 7 $492,200,000 7 $460,100,000 8 $401,900,000
Cape Fox Corporation 39 $68,500,055 42 $60,632,693 41 63,532,532 - - - -
Chenega Corporation 6 $830,000,000 6 $876,000,000 4 $927,000,000 5 $882,000,000 5 $885,000,000
Choggiung Ltd. 33 $95,700,000 - - - - - - - -
Chugach Alaska Corporation 5 $949,000,0000 5 $920,000,000 6 $842,000,000 6 $758,000,000 6 $626,000,000
Chugach Electric Association 20 $202,253,000 18 $224,689,000 17 $197,747,579 16 $216,421,152 13 $281,318,513
Colville 34 $98,699,990 34 $87,479,056 31 $96,299,358 25 $132,986,277 26 $125,690,815
Construction Machinery Industrial 31 $105,000,000 31 $98,500,000 29 $98,000,000 30 $105,000,000 25 $127,000,000
Company: Afognak Native Corporation
Rank 2019: 7
2018 Revenue: $643,686,000
Rank 2018: 7
2017 Revenue: $608,104,000
Rank 2017: 8
2016 Revenue: $474,271,000
Rank 2016: 8
2015 Revenue: $457,569,000
Rank 2015: 7
2014 Revenue: $505,346,000
Company: Ahtna, Inc.
Rank 2019: 14
2018 Revenue: $284,400,000
Rank 2018: 16
2017 Revenue: $238,000,000
Rank 2017: 16
2016 Revenue: $217,700,000
Rank 2016: 18
2015 Revenue: $188,400,000
Rank 2015: 18
2014 Revenue: $185,000,000
Company: Airport Equipment Rentals
Rank 2019: 47
2018 Revenue: $55,900,000
Rank 2018: 45
2017 Revenue: $55,100,000
Rank 2017: 44
2016 Revenue: $54,361,000
Rank 2016: 39
2015 Revenue: $75,624,000
Rank 2015: 44
2014 Revenue: $63,212,586
TRANSPORTATION
Getting Goods Around the Globe
The ins and outs of international imports and exports
By Vanessa Orr
TRANSPORTATION
Getting Goods Around the Globe
The ins and outs of international imports and exports
By Vanessa Orr
International shipper TransGroup Global has more than ninety offices worldwide.

TransGroup Global Logistics

International shipper TransGroup Global
International shipper TransGroup Global has more than ninety offices worldwide.

TransGroup Global Logistics

“There are only a couple of airlines that directly serve Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, which means that goods have to be routed through Seattle and then transferred via Alaska Airlines or put on a barge.”
Beau Rogers, International Key Account Manager
TransGroup Global Logistics
Oil and Gas
Rig No. 1 at BlueCrest Energy’s Cosmopolitan Unit in Cook Inlet.

BlueCrest Energy

Oil Season
The industry prepares for winter drilling
By Amy Newman
F

all is well underway, and with it signs that Alaska’s oil and gas industry is busy preparing for the 2019-2020 winter drilling season. Available project details indicate a winter season that expands upon last season’s successes, continued exploration in the Nanushuk Formation, and the design and implementation of new technologies to help companies better identify potential prospects and guide future exploration.

Project Timelines

“These days companies are looking really at January [as a start date] so they can ensure the ice infrastructure will be in place,” says Graham Smith, permitting section chief with the Alaska Division of Oil and Gas. “The flood of permits, meetings, and planning sessions these days is happening more in the September/October timeframe, although we’re starting to see some applications come in August.”

Smith says that while the Division historically likes to know what projects are in the pipeline, they encourage companies to hold off on submitting permit applications until all the details are finalized.

“These projects can go through many different iterations, and in the past we’ve dedicated staff time and resources to processing permit applications only to have the company come back and say, ‘Plans changed, now this is what we’re actually going to do,’” Smith explains. “When it comes to the permitting aspect, we ask that they come in when they’re actually ready to roll.”

Anchorage Economic Development Corporation President and CEO Bill Popp says the short-term outlook for drilling this winter looks promising, even though the state won’t see an immediate financial benefit.

“I think we’ve got some things to be optimistic about in terms of increased activity, but it’s going to be awhile before that impact has any impact on the state treasury,” he says.

Oil and Gas
Rig No. 1 at BlueCrest Energy’s Cosmopolitan Unit in Cook Inlet.

NBBJ/©Benjamin Benschneider

Oil Season
The industry prepares for winter drilling
By Amy Newman
F

all is well underway, and with it signs that Alaska’s oil and gas industry is busy preparing for the 2019-2020 winter drilling season. Available project details indicate a winter season that expands upon last season’s successes, continued exploration in the Nanushuk Formation, and the design and implementation of new technologies to help companies better identify potential prospects and guide future exploration.

Project Timelines

“These days companies are looking really at January [as a start date] so they can ensure the ice infrastructure will be in place,” says Graham Smith, permitting section chief with the Alaska Division of Oil and Gas. “The flood of permits, meetings, and planning sessions these days is happening more in the September/October timeframe, although we’re starting to see some applications come in August.”

ENGINEERING
All
Hands
on
Deck
Naval architecture and marine engineering require communication and collaboration
By Brad Joyal
ENGINEERING
All
Hands
on
Deck
Naval architecture and marine engineering require communication and collaboration
By Brad Joyal
“Boats are all computer cut nowadays, and that process of taking a 3D shape and our drawings and turning it into pieces to cut is called lofting… Lofting is a fairly detailed process, and it’s not something you can rush. Say you’re doing a new fishing vessel, you really need six to eight months of design time and two to three months of lofting before you can give it to the shipyard.”
Pat Eberhardt, Owner/Principal Engineer
Coastwise Corporation
I

t’s easy to marvel at the size and scope of the large marine vessels that pull into port in Glacier Bay, Juneau, Ketchikan, or Sitka. Between their size, design, and stature, the sight of some of the vessels can take a person’s breath away.

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand?
I have a copy of the The Lord of the Rings by
J. R. R. Tolkien. I actually reread that story quite often.

What movie do you recommend to everyone?
I recently saw Green Book and thought it was well acted and well written. Of course, I am a big Marvel fan and have seen all the movies. I was a comic book fan as a kid and like how they have recreated the look and feel of the old printed comics.

What’s the first thing you do after work?
I have a pretty long day and like to spend it with my wife as much as I can to keep some work/life balance.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live?
I like Hawaii, but my wife does not like living on an island (even though Alaska is one). I guess Eastern Washington would be a second choice given its four distinct seasons.

If you could domesticate a wild animal what animal would it be?
Probably kind of dangerous, but I have always liked lynx.

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand?
I have a copy of the The Lord of the Rings by
J. R. R. Tolkien. I actually reread that story quite often.

What movie do you recommend to everyone?
I recently saw Green Book and thought it was well acted and well written. Of course, I am a big Marvel fan and have seen all the movies. I was a comic book fan as a kid and like how they have recreated the look and feel of the old printed comics.

What’s the first thing you do after work?
I have a pretty long day and like to spend it with my wife as much as I can to keep some work/life balance.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live?
I like Hawaii, but my wife does not like living on an island (even though Alaska is one). I guess Eastern Washington would be a second choice given its four distinct seasons.

If you could domesticate a wild animal what animal would it be?
Probably kind of dangerous, but I have always liked lynx.

Off the Cuff

Michael Burke
M

ichael Burke was named the CEO at MTA in September 2015 and brings with him more than thirty-five years of experience with telecommunications and technology matters. He has worked in senior management for a diverse number of companies, including the Anchorage Telephone Utility, TelAlaska, and Alaska Fiber Star/WCI Cable. In addition, prior to MTA, Burke ran his own management/utility consulting company for fourteen years, where he worked on a number of regulatory and strategic projects and also served as an expert witness before regulatory agencies in Alaska, California, and Hawaii. Burke has a BA in accounting from Seattle University and is a CPA in the State of Alaska. [Editor’s Note: Sending a Hulk-sized thank you to BOSCO’s for supporting our super-secret mission to capture Michael Burke’s image at your command center.]

Events Calendar
Events Calendar
Anchorage
OCT
4-6
Make It Alaskan Festival
This festival features more than 120 booths showcasing arts, crafts, food products, jewelry, produce, and homegrown products from artisans ranging from Utqiaġvik to Ketchikan. Entry to the festival at Dena’ina Center is free to the public. makeitalaskanfestival.com
OCT
10-11
Summerland
So much more than a ghost story, this spooky and riveting drama is about William H. Mumler, a Victorian-era spirit photographer who captures haunting images of the dead from the world beyond the veil—or is he a fraud? cyranos.org
OCT
31
Zoo Boo
Put on a costume and visit the Alaska Zoo to celebrate Halloween. There will be spooky trail decorations, event staff in costumes, and trick-or-treat stations throughout zoo grounds. The fun gets underway at 4 p.m. and runs until 8 p.m. Dress warm and carry a flash light to help light the way around the zoo while visiting the animals in this nocturnal setting. alaskazoo.org
Eagle River
OCT
4
2019 Eagle River Brewfest
Sample a variety of Alaska beers, including selections from Arkose Brewery, Broken Tooth Brewing, Denali Brewing, Double Shovel Cider, Glacier BrewHouse, Midnight Sun Brewing, Odd Man Rush, Resolution Brewing, and 49th State Brewing. Complimentary appetizers and non-alcoholic drinks will also be served. Proceeds benefit the Eagle River Boys & Girls Club. eagleriverbrewfest.com
Haunted Hotels
Haunted Hotels
Transcendental Travels
F

or many travelers amenities play a pivotal part when picking the perfect hotel—for some a stunning view is requisite, for others a giant, garden tub to soak their cares away is imperative, and then there are those who want something a little more… ethereal. For adventurers in pursuit of a spooky experience, we present Alaska’s most haunted hotels (reportedly).

Anchorage
Historic Anchorage Hotel
Over the years guests at “one of the most haunted hotels in Alaska” report seeing the ghosts of children, a woman who died and appears in her wedding dress, and Anchorage’s first Chief of Police, Jack Sturgus, who was shot and killed near the hotel in 1921 and is said to be seeking justice for this still unsolved crime. For those in search of a ghostly experience, make sure to request room 215 or 217, both reported to be the most active with spirits.
historicanchoragehotel.com

Hotel Captain Cook
The women’s bathroom, in particular the last stall on the left, is the spiritual hotspot at the Hotel Captain Cook. The story goes that the young woman who took her life in the bathroom is so angry and caused such a ruckus and feelings of unease among visitors and staff over the years that hotel management eventually decided to solve the problem by bolting the stall door shut. It remains bolted shut today, though whether the spirit is contained inside is up for debate.
captaincook.com

Business Events

October
October 2
Alaska State of Reform Health Policy Conference
Dena’ina Center, Anchorage: The conference is about challenging current thought processes about healthcare and discovering innovation outside of individual silos, bringing together policy makers, health insurance leaders, and hospital system and provider executives. stateofreform.com
October 4-12
Anchorage Design Week
Anchorage Museum: This nine-day event includes keynotes and talks, workshops, and weekend socials covering everything from architecture to fashion, furniture, food, and more. anchoragedesignweek.org
October 7-10
ATIA Annual Convention & Trade Show
Centennial Hall, Juneau: The Alaska Travel Industry Association is the leading nonprofit trade organization for the state’s tourism industry. The theme for this year’s conference is “Legend of Alaska.” alaskatia.org
October 8-10
Alaska Recreation & Park Association Conference
Pike’s Waterfront Lodge, Fairbanks: The focus of the conference is threefold: opportunities for continuing education and the exchange of best practices, the chance to network with other peers, and to recognize accomplishments through the ARPA Awards Ceremony. This year’s theme is “A Time for Renewal.” alaskarpa.org
Inside Alaska Business
BP | Hilcorp
BP has agreed to sell its entire business in Alaska to Hilcorp Alaska. Under the terms of the agreement, Hilcorp will purchase all of BP’s interests in the state for a total consideration of $5.6 billion. The sale will include BP’s entire upstream and midstream business in the state, including BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc., that owns all of BP’s upstream oil and gas interests in Alaska, and BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc.’s interest in the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). Subject to state and federal regulatory approval, the transaction is expected to be completed in 2020.

Approximately 1,600 employees are currently associated with BP’s Alaska business and BP is committed to providing clarity about their future as soon as possible as part of the transition process with Hilcorp.

Hilcorp has been operating in Alaska since 2012 and is today the largest private oil and gas operator in the state, currently operating more than 75,000 barrels of oil equivalent a day gross production. bp.com/us | hilcorp.com

Right Moves
Ahtna
Ahtna announced several employee changes within its subsidiaries, including hires, promotions, and new certifications.
Rachael Wasson, an Ahtna shareholder, has been promoted to Procurement Specialist with Ahtna Environmental, Inc. Her responsibilities include preparing subcontracts and subcontract change orders.
Rachael Wasson
Wasson
Chad Faverty has been promoted to Contracts Administrator with Ahtna Environmental, Inc. His responsibilities include setting up subcontractor documents for projects, tracking subcontractor documents, and providing assistance to the rest of the procurement staff.
Chad Faverty
Faverty

Alaska Trends

Top 49ers By Decade Since 1989

*Financial data has not been adjusted for INFLATION.

Top 49ers By Decade Since 1989

*Financial data has not been adjusted for INFLATION.

Top 49ers Employees
Thanks for reading our October 2019 issue!