Chris Devine
President & CEO
Craig Taylor Equipment
Hardware Hangs In text
March 2021
March 2021 | Volume 38 | Number 3 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Insuring Peace of Mind

Surety bonds: Sleep-at-night coverage for when the job must get done
By Tracy Barbour

How to Deliver Fuel Anywhere

The complex distribution of critical, refined oil products
By Danny Kreilkamp

The Real Estate Reality

Despite hiccups brokers expect an economic rebound later in 2021
By Bruno J. Navarro

Pushing Boundaries

ANCs find success investing beyond state borders
By Vanessa Orr
Resource Development: Reaching for Rare Earth

Reaching for Rare Earth

Alaska’s critical minerals—including rare earth elements—gain national attention
By Vanessa Orr
Ucore Rare Metals

Study, Plan, Build

Executing quality projects while mitigating environmental effects
By Julie Stricker
CIRI

Study, Plan, Build

Executing quality projects while mitigating environmental effects
By Julie Stricker
CIRI
Environmental: Study, Plan, Build

Insuring Peace of Mind

Surety bonds: Sleep-at-night coverage for when the job must get done
By Tracy Barbour

How to Deliver Fuel Anywhere

The complex distribution of critical, refined oil products
By Danny Kreilkamp

The Real Estate Reality

Despite hiccups brokers expect an economic rebound later in 2021
By Bruno J. Navarro

Pushing Boundaries

ANCs find success investing beyond state borders
By Vanessa Orr
Resource Development: Reaching for Rare Earth

Reaching for Rare Earth

Alaska’s critical minerals—including rare earth elements—gain national attention
By Vanessa Orr
Ucore Rare Metals
Special Section: Construction
CARES Act, AIP funding multiple airport construction projects
By Julie Stricker
Alaska’s path to better (and longer) visitor experiences
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Contractors, community help bring public projects to fruition
By Vanessa Orr
Davis Constructors & Engineers
Building Common Ground: Contractors, community help bring public projects to fruition
Construction retailers keep optimism in stock
By Tasha Anderson
Kerry Tasker

About The Cover

Heading into the pandemic, Chris Devine and the Craig Taylor Equipment team were expecting the worst. Brick and mortar retail is historically one of the harder-hit sectors during economic recession, and a 2020 study from Yelp estimates that nearly 100,000 businesses closed their doors permanently between May and August of 2020 alone. But this trend didn’t necessarily translate to the retail construction space—and in some cases, demand went up. “What seems to be happening is there’s a lot of money floating around, and folks are looking to spend it,” says the Craig Taylor Equipment President and CEO.

And spending it they are. To learn how, dig in to this month’s cover story: “Hardware Hangs In.

Cover Photo by Kerry Tasker

Hardware Hangs In: Construction retailers keep optimism in stock
Construction retailers keep optimism in stock
By Tasha Anderson
Kerry Tasker
CARES Act, AIP funding multiple airport construction projects
By Julie Stricker
Alaska’s path to better (and longer) visitor experiences
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Contractors, community help bring public projects to fruition
By Vanessa Orr
Davis Constructors & Engineers
Building Common Ground: Contractors, community help bring public projects to fruition

About The Cover

Heading into the pandemic, Chris Devine and the Craig Taylor Equipment team were expecting the worst. Brick and mortar retail is historically one of the harder-hit sectors during economic recession, and a 2020 study from Yelp estimates that nearly 100,000 businesses closed their doors permanently between May and August of 2020 alone. But this trend didn’t necessarily translate to the retail construction space—and in some cases, demand went up. “What seems to be happening is there’s a lot of money floating around, and folks are looking to spend it,” says the Craig Taylor Equipment President and CEO.

And spending it they are. To learn how, dig in to this month’s cover story: “Hardware Hangs In.

Cover Photo by Kerry Tasker

Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc. 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373. © 2021 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & October issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.
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From the Editor

Alaska’s Essential Construction Industry
T

he construction industry is responsible for about 9 percent of all Alaska jobs, and construction industry-related activity accounted for $3.4 billion in labor income in 2019, representing 10 percent of the state’s total labor income ($32.7 billion).

The industry has continued to inject billions of dollars into the Alaska economy—even in the face of the devastating effects of the pandemic—as the state perseveres, continuing to build, expand, and upgrade. In 2021, the industry is expected to spend $4.3 billion, split pretty evenly between the private and public sectors, according to AGC of Alaska’s 2021 Construction Spending Forecast.

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Volume 38, #3
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
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INSURANCE
Insuring Peace of Mind
Surety bonds: Sleep-at-night coverage for when the job must get done
By Tracy Barbour
S

urety bonds are an essential but often misunderstood insurance product used by companies that serve both the public and private sectors. Surety bonds are a distinct type of insurance designed to ensure a project is completed based on the terms of the contract. More specifically, a surety bond is a three-party agreement in which a surety (bonding company) promises to pay an obligee (the project owner or whoever is requiring the bond) if a principal (the contractor or whoever needs the bond) does not satisfy their contractual obligation.

The world is changing… and so is Alaska.
Are you ready?
Connecting Alaska for over 40 years
Integrated electrical, telecommunications, construction, and engineering solutions
Connecting Alaska for over 40 years
Integrated electrical, telecommunications, construction, and engineering solutions
The world is changing… and so is Alaska.
Are you ready?
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Connecting Alaska for over 40 years
Integrated electrical, telecommunications, construction, and engineering solutions
HR MATTERS
A Journey of Engagement Amidst Change
By Paula Bradison
W

hile the recent worldwide pandemic plays out as a major economic influence, keeping our employees engaged and productive is more important and challenging than ever. According to a Gallup survey* published during the third quarter of 2020, 33 percent of US workers are currently working remotely, with approximately two-thirds of those individuals communicating a desire to continue working from home post-pandemic. Interestingly of those surveyed, more than half of US workers are not concerned about the exposure of COVID-19 at work. What does this mean to our Alaskan business leaders? Something entrepreneurs have known for years, change is here to stay. How we navigate change will influence workforce engagement. As leaders our best course now is to seek out opportunity to move from (disaster) response to active change management.

Oil & Gas
How to Deliver Fuel Anywhere
The complex distribution of critical, refined oil products
By Danny Kreilkamp
R

efined petroleum doesn’t just heat our homes and fuel our cars: it ensures Alaska’s economy is a well-oiled machine. But how does a substance formed from the fossilized remains of plants and animals transform into useful, highly valuable products? And of equal importance, how does processed petroleum eventually reach its various end users?

Following its 800-mile journey from the wells of Prudhoe Bay through the winding Trans Alaska Pipeline System, North Slope crude arrives at a tract of land covering 1,000 acres in the northeast corner of Prince William Sound: the Valdez Marine Terminal. From here, the raw product is loaded onto tankers and shipped off to a variety of locations. While it’s true that much of this oil is exported to destinations across the globe, a great deal of product actually remains in the state—contrary to a long and widely held misconception.

Distribution tanker traveling
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Comfortable. Affordable. Safe and Sanitary. Personal.

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Real Estate
The Real Estate
Reality
Despite hiccups brokers expect an economic rebound later in 2021
By Bruno J. Navarro
Alaska Real Estate Reality
cweimer4 | iStock
T

he COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on state and local economies throughout the United States, and, at least temporarily, changed the landscape of commercial real estate in Alaska. The good news is that real estate experts say it’s only a matter of time before the market rebounds.

The Oil Field of the Future title
By Aaron Helmericks
Senior Director, Energy & Mining, GCI Business
A technician wearing smart glasses with AR allows field workers to perform tasks handsfree while also virtually pulling in an expert from anywhere in the world for hands-on troubleshooting.
V

olatility in the global oil market, the recent decline in oil prices and extreme weather patterns in Alaska have made digital innovation in the oil and gas industry essential. To remain competitive in a rapidly changing marketplace, operators in the North Slope must find new ways to increase efficiency, reduce costs and improve safety for employees in the field.

Tab
Hardware
Hangs In
Construction retailers keep optimism in stock
By Tasha Anderson
T

urns out, predicting the effects of a pandemic on a global economy is kind of impossible. In the midst of the uncertainty, those companies that crumbled and those that found ways to thrive seemed random at times, depending on local economies, access to financial aid, the unpredictability of consumers, changing regulations, and a little bit of “who knows.”

Fortunately, many businesses have found ways to make it work. And at the turn of the new year, following several months of various degrees of hunkering down and the slow but steady distribution of vaccines, there was a general sense that Alaska might be reaching a turning point—that perhaps, with continued caution, the worst could be behind us.

In February, Acting Anchorage Mayor Austin Quinn-Davidson eased hunker down restrictions in response to a significant drop in the number of COVID-19 cases statewide, and the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation’s annual Economic Forecast, published in January, anticipates that by the second half of 2021, there will be additional jobs in most major sectors in the state.

Construction SPECIAL SECTION
Hardware
Hangs In
Construction retailers keep optimism in stock
By Tasha Anderson
T

urns out, predicting the effects of a pandemic on a global economy is kind of impossible. In the midst of the uncertainty, those companies that crumbled and those that found ways to thrive seemed random at times, depending on local economies, access to financial aid, the unpredictability of consumers, changing regulations, and a little bit of “who knows.”

Fortunately, many businesses have found ways to make it work. And at the turn of the new year, following several months of various degrees of hunkering down and the slow but steady distribution of vaccines, there was a general sense that Alaska might be reaching a turning point—that perhaps, with continued caution, the worst could be behind us.

In February, Acting Anchorage Mayor Austin Quinn-Davidson eased hunker down restrictions in response to a significant drop in the number of COVID-19 cases statewide, and the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation’s annual Economic Forecast, published in January, anticipates that by the second half of 2021, there will be additional jobs in most major sectors in the state.

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turning the page
CONSTRUCTION SPECIAL SECTION
Building Common
Ground
Contractors, community help bring
public projects to fruition
By Vanessa Orr
As part of the Anchorage Museum expansion, Davis Constructors & Engineers installed nine new columns threaded through the existing structure. The heaviest beam weighed 30,000 pounds.

Davis Constructors & Engineers

A

ccording to the Associated General Contractors of Alaska’s (AGC) 2021 Construction Spending Forecast, construction spending this year is expected to total $4.3 billion, with 52 percent ($2.2 billion) of that money spent on private sector projects and 48 percent ($2.1 billion) spent on public sector projects. While a large part of the public sector funding includes national defense projects and highway and road construction and improvements, it also encompasses community-based projects that include school replacements and renovations, regional housing initiatives, behavioral health and other medical facilities, and spaces dedicated to the arts.

Where Engineering Meets the Environment.
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Specializing in:

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CONSTRUCTION SPECIAL SECTION
Getting Off the
Ground
CARES Act, AIP funding multiple airport
construction projects
By Julie Stricker
DOT&PF
A

ir travel is a lifeline for Alaska, connecting major urban hubs to remote gravel landing strips and back.

The Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities (DOT&PF) oversees maintenance on more than 300 aviation facilities, including 237 airports. In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic hit much of the state’s aviation industry hard, with a major rural carrier declaring bankruptcy and a drastic reduction in passenger travel curtailing flights and cancelling seasonal air schedules. But all of the disruption came with a silver lining: increased federal funding and a reminder of Alaska’s importance to global cargo routes.

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Regulatory Compliance Support
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Contingency Planning
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907-586-6813
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Learn more at www.nortechengr.com
FAIRBANKS
907-452-5688

ANCHORAGE
907-222-2445

JUNEAU
907-586-6813

Learn more at www.nortechengr.com
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CONSTRUCTION SPECIAL SECTION
Attractions
Gaining Traction
Alaska’s path to better (and longer)
visitor experiences
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Teri Hendricks | Visit Anchorage Alaska
T

he Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport and the state’s ports and other vital gateways for long-haul tourism destinations are what most think of when it comes to tourism infrastructure. However, community visitor centers, roadside cabins, and robust trail systems are also essential parts of the infrastructure needed to support this multi-billion dollar sector in Alaska.

“We lack tourism infrastructure all over the state,” says Bonnie Quill, president and CEO of the Mat-Su Convention & Visitors Bureau. “What tourism infrastructure does is it increases the visitor experience, whether it’s a visitor center or a trailhead or the new ski lift at Hatcher Pass.”

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At Crowley Fuels, we don’t just talk about dependability – we deliver it, every time. We serve industries across Alaska, safely and reliably delivering millions of gallons of high-quality fuel across Alaska and Canada. From small projects to large, we can help keep your business running smoothly. For the fuel partner you can depend on, contact Crowley Fuels.
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Construction Special Section
Construction Directory
Commercial & Industrial Suppliers
ABC
Susan Ellison, Pres.
401 Driveway St.
Fairbanks, AK 99701
akabc.com
[email protected]
907-457-2221
General contractor specializing in energy efficient remodeling and product sales. Seamless siding and gutters, windows, doors, and all remodeling. Material sales include: commercial and residential doors, windows, metal siding, and metal flashing.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1995/1995 | 15/15
AirSide Solutions
Rick Lafferty, VP/Region Mgr.
2222 W. Valley Hwy. N., Ste. 140
Auburn, WA 98001
airsidesolutionsinc.com
[email protected]
253-833-6434
AirSide Solutions is a full line provider of Airfield and Heliport Lighted Navigation systems, technical services, and logistics support to the aviation market in Alaska.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1978/1988 | 13/-
Alaska Dreams
Meini Huser, Pres./CEO
2081 Van Horn Rd., Ste. 2
Fairbanks, AK 99701
alaskadreamsinc.com
[email protected]
907-455-7712
Design, sales, and construction of fabric covered steel building and pre-engineered metal buildings.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1994/1994 | 30/30
We are the Pipefitters & Welders of the United Association typogrphy
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Environmental
Study, Plan, Build
Executing quality projects while mitigating environmental effects
By Julie Stricker
CIRI
I

f you take a drive along the Steese Highway north of Fairbanks on a sunny summer afternoon, the landscape alternates between lushly forested hills and bare, twisting mounds of rock sprinkled with scrubby trees and brush on the valley floors.

These mounds of rock, which sometimes extend for miles, are the result of gold mining using bucket dredges from the ‘30s to the ‘70s. These giant machines, some of which are still scattered among Alaska’s historic placer mining sites, picked up the gold-bearing earth in huge buckets, sifted out the gold and dumped the tons of waste rock in long ropy strands behind it. Decades later, those lines of mine tailings are stark evidence of the industry, which at the time had no rules about reclaiming the land after mining.

Times have changed. A few miles up the Steese Highway is a green, grassy hillside that was the site of another mine twenty years ago. True North mine was active between 2001 and 2004. Kinross, which operates the larger Fort Knox gold mine 7 miles south, produced 11.7 million tons of gold ore from the 2,050 acre site, which yielded 490,000 ounces of gold from the milling operations at Fort Knox.

Before mining began, Kinross had submitted a site reclamation plan to the Department of Natural Resources. When mining operations ended, Kinross started remediating the site, 615 acres of which had been directly affected by mining operations. Over the next six years, the site was graded and recontoured, reseeded and fertilized, and all mining structures were removed. Native trees and plants were reintroduced. The site was then monitored for several years to ensure the landscape was stabilized.

Photo credit: SLR
SLR Celebrates 20 Years in Alaska
S

LR International Corporation (SLR) is celebrating its 20-year anniversary – initially establishing U.S. operations in Washington State in 2000 followed with opening offices in Anchorage and Fairbanks in 2001. Throughout this time, SLR’s technical team and resources have been committed to providing responsive, technical solutions for our clients across multiple business sectors.

Originally focused on clients in the natural resource and upstream oil and gas sectors, the Alaska team has grown and expanded its compliance, permitting, emergency response and advisory expertise to cover clients in the power, infrastructure, and industry business sectors. With its team of 40 employees, SLR staff are adept at working in and understanding the environmental and regulatory complexities of working in the Arctic and cold region environments providing solutions for facility development, land development and restoration, community engagement and, increasingly, coastal management and resiliency planning at locations throughout the state.

Resource Development
The Dotson Ridge resource is the highest grade NI 43-101 compliant heavy rare earth resource on US soil. The resource is open both at depth and on strike, indicating potential expansion.

Ucore Rare Metals

Reaching for Rare Earth
Alaska’s critical minerals—including rare earth elements—gain national attention
By Vanessa Orr
H

ave you used a cellphone, logged on to a computer, or watched a flat screen TV lately? If so, you’ve been using a device that requires rare earth elements (REEs). And while these elements can be found throughout the world, including in Alaska, most of the world’s production takes place in China, putting the supply chain for hundreds of products—as well as significant defense applications—at risk.

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Alaska Native
Yulista Holding, LLC
Pushing Boundaries
ANCs find success investing beyond state borders
By Vanessa Orr
O

ne of the main goals of Alaska Native Corporations (ANCs) is to earn money for their shareholders. And while many have been very successful in starting and running businesses within the state’s borders, there are even more opportunities to be found nationally and internationally. To this end, many regional and village corporations have expanded their business holdings far beyond the 49th State, not only to provide a new source of revenue for their parent companies but to service clients across the country and the world.

Inside Alaska Business
Craig Taylor Equipment | Dobbs Peterbilt
Craig Taylor Equipment has acquired all of its Alaska Peterbilt assets from Dobbs Peterbilt. Formerly known as Western Peterbilt and now operating as Peterbilt of Alaska, the assets include branch locations in Anchorage and Fairbanks, equipment, and approximately forty employees. “Our business has been around for sixty-five years; we have a lot of deeply entrenched customers in Alaska, many of which are also Peterbilt customers—or could be. And so we think there’s a lot of synergy opportunity there that could be beneficial on both sides,” says Craig Taylor Equipment President and CEO Chris Devine.
craigtaylorequipment.com | dobbspeterbilt.com
Economic Indicators
ANS Crude Oil Production
493,545 barrels
-1% change from previous month
1/31/21
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources
ANS West Coast Crude Oil Prices
$56.47 per barrel
10% change from previous month
2/1/21
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources
Statewide Employment
347,9351 Labor Force
5.8% Unemployment
12/1/21. Adjusted seasonally.
Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Right Moves
Denali Universal
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Bourne
Following Bob Kean’s retirement, Maria Bourne has been promoted to President of Denali Universal Services (DUS). Over the past five years as senior vice president of operations and chief financial officer, Bourne has been responsible for DUS’ financial management. Her responsibilities included supervising operational execution, assisting in company growth, facilitating development, and supervising internal management. Along with her bachelor’s in accounting from UAA, Bourne is a CPA and has spent more than a decade in senior financial management positions. Prior to DUS, she worked at KPMG, where her work focused on auditing, advisory, and valuation services.
Growing with Alaska. text

Span Alaska’s new Anchorage Service Center (ASC) means even better service and more options for our customers statewide.

Our new facility increases our capacity, improves our security, offers customizable storage areas, and streamlines freight handling — all to enable faster, smoother, and more consistent delivery of your cargo to its final destination.

Stop by our new ASC and see what Span Alaska can do for you.

Or, to schedule a pickup or find the terminal nearest you, call 1-800-257-7726 or visit us at spanalaska.com.

Span Alaska logo
Growing with Alaska. text

Span Alaska’s new Anchorage Service Center (ASC) means even better service and more options for our customers statewide.

Our new facility increases our capacity, improves our security, offers customizable storage areas, and streamlines freight handling — all to enable faster, smoother, and more consistent delivery of your cargo to its final destination.

Stop by our new ASC and see what Span Alaska can do for you.

Or, to schedule a pickup or find the terminal nearest you, call 1-800-257-7726 or visit us at spanalaska.com.

Span Alaska logo

Alaska Trends

F

ew industries have been spared the pandemic’s disruptions and far-reaching effects. And fewer have a clear path to recovery. Fortunately for Alaska’s construction industry, there is some cause for optimism according to a recent report from the Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Construction projects across the state are a silver lining in an otherwise bleak year for Alaska’s economy. In Anchorage, real estate construction in particular is trending up, with the number of new home permits hitting a new high since 2015. Record-low interest rates mean refinancing opportunities are skyrocketing. Elsewhere in Fairbanks, a growing military population could result in an added boost to home construction and remodeling. And with the long-awaited rollout of a few promising vaccines, this month’s installment of Alaska Trends delivers news of a few other welcome developments.

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?

I’m reading the new book by Brad Taylor, American Traitor: A Pike Logan Novel.

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work?

I greet the family, give them hugs, help my wife with dinner, and then we gather around the table for our family dinner.

What vacation spot is on your bucket list?

I’ve never been to Europe, so I would just say anywhere in Europe.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?

I’m not really a big pet fan, so I don’t think I would [he laughs]. I guess if you could miniaturize like a giraffe or an elephant and have that as a pet, and it was about the size of a dog, that would be rather interesting.

Luke Blomfield in a workshop

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?

I’m reading the new book by Brad Taylor, American Traitor: A Pike Logan Novel.

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work?

I greet the family, give them hugs, help my wife with dinner, and then we gather around the table for our family dinner.

What vacation spot is on your bucket list?

I’ve never been to Europe, so I would just say anywhere in Europe.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?

I’m not really a big pet fan, so I don’t think I would [he laughs]. I guess if you could miniaturize like a giraffe or an elephant and have that as a pet, and it was about the size of a dog, that would be rather interesting.

Images ©Kerry Tasker

Off the Cuff

Luke Blomfield
L

uke Blomfield joined Davis Constructors & Engineers in 2002; by 2012 he was a partner at the company. He’s been the general contractor’s president and CEO for a little more than two years, and today he’s also the president of Mass Excavation. Despite his upward movement and the more than two decades he’s spent in construction, what he loves about his job remains the same. “I still think the favorite part of my job is what brought me to it: when we’ve completed construction of a building, an infrastructure project, or any sort of development that’s going to be there long after I’m gone, it’s nice to drive around town or different places throughout the state and just say, ‘Our team had a hand in building that.’”

PND Engineers, Inc. work zone
PND Engineers, Inc. logo
PND is proud to have partnered with the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities, and Western Marine Construction, on the Tenakee Springs Ferry Terminal Improvements Project. Shallow bedrock and natural hot springs presented challenges at the site, calling for innovation and value engineering to address geotechnical concerns and minimize cost. The project, completed in December 2020, brings the multi-purpose facility up to code in order to meet the local community’s ongoing ferry service, fuel and freight needs.
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Portland
Vancouver, B.C.
CivilPlanningSurveyingStructuralPermittingMarine FacilitiesGeotechnicalEnvironmental TransportationCoastal Engineering HydrologyContract AdministrationConstruction Engineering Support
PND Engineers, Inc. work zone
PND Engineers, Inc. logo
PND is proud to have partnered with the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities, and Western Marine Construction, on the Tenakee Springs Ferry Terminal Improvements Project. Shallow bedrock and natural hot springs presented challenges at the site, calling for innovation and value engineering to address geotechnical concerns and minimize cost. The project, completed in December 2020, brings the multi-purpose facility up to code in order to meet the local community’s ongoing ferry service, fuel and freight needs.
CivilPlanningSurveyingStructuralPermittingMarine FacilitiesGeotechnicalEnvironmental TransportationCoastal Engineering HydrologyContract AdministrationConstruction Engineering Support
AnchorageJuneauPalmerSeattleHoustonPortlandVancouver, B.C.
John Deere | AER logos
6 John Deere 470 G machines
John Deere 470G machine without bucket
John Deere dozer in use
John Deere excavators lined up without buckets
Five John Deere excavators in use
6 John Deere 470 G machines
John Deere 470G machine without bucket
John Deere dozer in use
John Deere excavators lined up without buckets
Five John Deere excavators in use
6 John Deere 470 G machines
John Deere 470G machine without bucket
John Deere dozer in use
John Deere excavators lined up without buckets
Five John Deere excavators in use
Anchorage
907.522.6466
The largest and most diverse equipment fleet across Alaska. text
The Rental Zone
907.474.2000
Delta Junction
907.895.9898
Fairbanks
907.456.2000
Prudhoe Bay
907.659.2000
Kenai
907.335.5466
The largest and most diverse equipment fleet across Alaska. text
Anchorage
907.522.6466

The Rental Zone
907.474.2000

Delta Junction
907.895.9898

Fairbanks
907.456.2000

Prudhoe Bay
907.659.2000

Kenai
907.335.5466

Hand holding a smartphone tracking a shipment

Plans Change.
Deadlines Don’t.

With Lynden you can choose the mode – air, land, or sea – that best fits your schedule and budget. Important shipment?
Track it from anywhere using Lynden’s mobile app, or choose to receive email updates as the status changes.
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Thanks for reading our March 2021 issue!