AUGUST 2019 | Volume 35 | Number 8 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Distinguishing Differences in Financial Institutions

Ever wondered how a big bank differs from a credit union? Here’s how.
By Tracy Barbour
© Matt Waliszek
Distinguishing Differences in Financial Institutions

Distinguishing Differences in Financial Institutions

Ever wondered how a big bank differs from a credit union? Here’s how.
By Tracy Barbour
© Matt Waliszek

Evolving Healthcare

Innovative digital technologies increase patient access, decrease costs
By Vanessa Orr

Building Alaska—Summer Edition

Construction projects from North Pole to the Kenai Peninsula
By Samantha Davenport

Cold Cargo

Expertise and careful planning are required to keep things exactly cold enough
By Vanessa Orr

Booming Interest in Nanushuk

Major players explore the formation’s production potential
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Environmental
Special Section

Assessing Environments

How scientists statewide protect Alaska’s lands
By Brad Joyal

‘Plans Are Nothing, Planning Is Everything’

Being proactive with spill contingency plans
By Amy Newman

Marginal Metal

Steel is the most recycled material in the world, but volume doesn’t always mean profit
By Sam Friedman
Alaska’s agriculture industry is ready to bloom

Growing Green

Alaska’s agriculture industry is ready to bloom
By Sam Friedman
©Javier Villasenor-Gaona

About The Cover

Alaska Business Magazine August 2019 Cover Alaska houses a range of financial institutions: banks, credit unions, trust companies, mortgage loan originators or lenders, and more. All of these entities work under varying regulations, overseen by different state or federal agencies, but what they all have in common is their desire to help Alaska’s businesses find stability, pursue growth, or otherwise meet their financial goals.

A special thanks to First National Bank Alaska (serving Alaskans since 1922), which allowed us to use the lobby of its stunning U-Med Branch for our cover shoot. From left to right: Elaine Kroll, senior vice president of cash management; Sheila Lomboy, VP and loan officer; and Charles Parker, president and CEO of Alaska Village Initiatives and an FNBA customer.

Cover Design: Jontue Hollingsworth | Photo: Matt Waliszek

From the Editor

One Sunny Summer
I

t’s been quite a summer so far in Alaska. If you love the sun, this has been a stunning display from Mother Nature with record breaking temperatures that sent many of us running to the nearest body of water for a bit of relief. And what better segue to introduce our annual environmental special section than this super-sized summer. This year we’re featuring several articles focused on the manifold ways businesses throughout the state work to keep our environment pristine, including when and how to implement an environmental contingency plan; what a site assessment entails; and how scrap metal is reused and recycled. Of course we also give you all the information you need to get familiar with the state’s environmental companies in our annual directory.

Kathryn Mackenzie

Kathryn Mackenzie
Managing Editor, Alaska Business

Volume 35, #8
Published by Alaska Business
Publishing Co. Anchorage, Alaska
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 [email protected]
Associate/Web Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2906 [email protected]
Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 [email protected]
Photo Contributor
Judy Patrick
BUSINESS STAFF
President
Billie Martin
VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 [email protected]
VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 [email protected]
Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 [email protected]
Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 [email protected]
Accounting Manager
Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 [email protected]
Customer Service Representative
Emily Olsen
257-2914 emily[email protected]
501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100 Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577
Toll Free: 1-800-770-4373
(907) 276-4373
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ALASKA BUSINESS PUBLISHING CO., INC.
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc., 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373; © 2019 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & October issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.
Healthcare
Healthcare
Evolving Healthcare
Innovative digital technologies increase patient access, decrease costs
By Vanessa Orr
E

very day, new technologies emerge that are designed to make it easier for people to connect with the things they need, and healthcare is no exception. Today’s tech-savvy patients are using digital means to make appointments, check test results, remember to take medication, get answers to health-related questions, and more.

Healthcare facilities are also using updated technology to run offices and practices more smoothly, using artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure equipment remains up and running, and taking advantage of virtual training tools to provide staff with continuing education opportunities. And insurers are embracing new technologies to deliver a more positive customer experience.

Finance
© Matt Waliszek
Finance
© Matt Waliszek
Distinguishing Differences in Financial Institutions
Ever wondered how a big bank differs from a credit union? Here’s how.
By Tracy Barbour
T

here are thousands of financial institutions in Alaska, providing everything from checking and savings accounts to loans and investment solutions.

Banks and credit unions are among the most prominent financial services companies serving Alaskans. However, there are distinct differences—and similarities—between how these institutions function to meet the needs of businesses and consumers. And each one fills a particular role in the financial services marketplace.

The state’s diverse roster of financial institutions also includes specialized entities: trust companies, finance companies, money service businesses, mortgage lenders/loan originators, and payday lenders. All of these institutions give Alaskans more choices when it comes to satisfying their financial requirements.

Construction
Building Alaska—Summer Edition
A&J Fotos / iStock
Construction projects from North Pole to the Kenai Peninsula
By Samantha Davenport
S

ummer is in full swing, and Alaskans know what that means: construction season.

ISER’s Alaska Construction Spending Forecast 2019 projects that construction in Alaska will increase 10 percent compared to 2018—rising to approximately $7.2 billion. An estimated $200 million of that is traceable to damages from the 7.1 earthquake that rattled the state last November.

But other projects, planned long in advance, are still taking place this summer. Alaska Business has compiled a few of these projects from across the state.

Environmental Special Section |
Site Assessment
Assessing Environments
How scientists statewide protect Alaska’s lands
By Brad Joyal

Surface soil sample collection.

Environmental Management Inc.

Environmental Special Section |
Site Assessment
A PenAir Saab 2000 flies past Denali.

Ravn Air Group

Assessing Environments
How scientists statewide protect Alaska’s lands
By Brad Joyal
N

o two environmental site assessments are the same. Organizations and individuals request assessments because of specific needs unique to the circumstances of their particular project. Environmental site assessments are most commonly used to determine the risks of contaminants on a property, and some projects require a more thorough assessment to be completed due to the history of the site.

Environmental site assessments are generally requested during the early stages of a transaction process, as the involved parties typically view the assessment as a part of the “due diligence” period before the transaction is complete, so the majority of Phase I site assessments occur before a property changes ownership. If contamination risks are identified and need remediation, the site would require a Phase II site assessment to clean up the contaminants.

Environmental Special Section |
Contingency Plans
Crowley’s tank farm in St. Mary’s was visited by Shannon & Wilson engineers as part of an SPCC plan update.

Shannon & Wilson

Environmental Special Section |
Contingency Plans
Crowley’s tank farm in St. Mary’s was visited by Shannon & Wilson engineers as part of an SPCC plan update.

Shannon & Wilson

‘Plans Are Nothing, Planning Is Everything’
Being proactive with spill contingency plans
By Amy Newman
A

ccording to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), just one gallon of spilled oil can contaminate more than 1 million gallons of water, so it’s critical for companies that deal with these products on a daily basis—whether in their primary trade or secondary to their primary business—to take steps to prevent a spill or discharge and mitigate the damage should one occur.

Enter environmental contingency plans. These documents provide companies with a blueprint that 1) helps implement safety and containment measures to prevent and mitigate the effects of accidental spills and discharges and 2) outlines response and clean-up procedures should catastrophe strike.

environmental Special Section | Directory
2019 Alaska Business
Environmental
Directory
environmental Special Section | Directory
2019 Alaska Business
Environmental
Directory
environmental Special Section | Directory
2019 Alaska Business
Environmental
Directory

ENVIRONMENTAL

1-Call Alaska

Top Executive: Todd Duke, GM
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 2015/2015
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 20/20
www.1callalaska.com | [email protected]

Oil spill response. Environmental compliance services ship monitoring.
6231 Airpark Pl.,Anchorage, AK 99502
907-243-0069

3M Alaska

Top Executive: Stephanie Mathers, Reg. Mgr.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1902/1971
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 90,000/12
3M.com | [email protected]
facebook.com/3M

3M manufactures a wide range of products covering many markets in Alaska. In the area of natural resources, we provide products and services that support the oil/gas and mining industries in worker safety, electrical, welding protection, and fire/corrosion protection.
11151 Calaska Cir., Anchorage, AK 99515
907-522-5200

ABR

Top Executive: Terry Schick, Dir. Business Dev.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1976/1976
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 49/49
abrinc.com | [email protected]
facebook.com/abrincorporated
twitter.com/abrinc_ak

Known for objective, rigorous work, ABR’s unrivaled experts provide innovative, cost-effective solutions on wildlife science; wetland, vegetation, and landscape ecology; fisheries and aquatic sciences; marine science; statistics, GIS, and database management; and NEPA and permitting. We are GSA contractors.
PO Box 80410, Fairbanks, AK 99708
907-455-6777

AECOM

Top Executive: Bill Craig, Sr. Mgr./Office Lead
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 1904/1948
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 85,000/267
aecom.com
AECOM Alaska is a team of engineers, scientists, planners, and support staff providing Arctic-smart engineering and environmental services for the complete project life-cycle from permitting for air, water, soils, and solid waste to planning, design, and construction through production and site closure.
700 G St., Suite 500, Anchorage, AK 99501
907-562-3366

Ahtna Engineering Services

Top Executive: Timothy F. Gould, Pres.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 2003/2003
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 103/46
ahtnaes.com
linkedin.com/company/ahtna-engineering-services

Ahtna Engineering Services is a self-performing federal and commercial contractor. The firm performs services nationwide including engineering, construction, environmental, administrative, and professional services. AES is positioned to support nationwide requirements with offices in Alaska, Washington, and California.
110 W. 38th Ave., Suite 200A, Anchorage, AK 99503
907-646-2969

Ahtna Environmental

Top Executive: Tim Finnigan, Pres.
Year Founded/Established in Alaska: 2010/2010
Worldwide/Alaska Employees: 175/57
aeiak.com
linkedin.com/company/ahtna-environmental-inc

Specializes in the execution of time-sensitive, complex, and multifaceted environmental, engineering, construction, and professional services projects for government and commercial clients.
110 W. 38th Ave., Suite 200B, Anchorage, AK 99503
907-644-0760

environmental Special Section | Steel & Scrap
A row of junked cars at the Fairbanks North Star Borough Solid Waste Facility. The middle vehicle is a Toyota Corona from the 1970s.

©Sam Friedman | Alaska Business

environmental Special Section | Steel & Scrap
A row of junked cars at the Fairbanks North Star Borough Solid Waste Facility. The middle vehicle is a Toyota Corona from the 1970s.

©Sam Friedman | Alaska Business

Marginal Metal
Steel is the most recycled material in the world, but volume doesn’t always mean profit
By Sam Friedman
I

n the world of recycling, the line between trash and treasure moves with geography and the state of world markets.

Generally speaking, plastics tend toward the trash end of the spectrum, especially low-grade materials like the “clam shell” plastic boxes that Anchorage and many other towns across the United States recently began to throw away as they’ve lost value as recycled materials.

Used metals, on the other hand, usually have value. Sometimes they have enough value to warrant extensive processing work—even enough to inspire thieves to tear out copper wiring or vehicle catalytic converters to “recycle” them. That’s especially true for non-ferrous metals: metals that don’t contain iron. Non-ferrous metals include aluminum, copper, and even precious metals like gold, silver, and platinum.

I

n the world of recycling, the line between trash and treasure moves with geography and the state of world markets.

Generally speaking, plastics tend toward the trash end of the spectrum, especially low-grade materials like the “clam shell” plastic boxes that Anchorage and many other towns across the United States recently began to throw away as they’ve lost value as recycled materials.

Used metals, on the other hand, usually have value. Sometimes they have enough value to warrant extensive processing work—even enough to inspire thieves to tear out copper wiring or vehicle catalytic converters to “recycle” them. That’s especially true for non-ferrous metals: metals that don’t contain iron. Non-ferrous metals include aluminum, copper, and even precious metals like gold, silver, and platinum.

TRANSPORTATION
Cold Cargo
Expertise and careful planning are required to keep things exactly cold enough
By Vanessa Orr
Lynden’s Hercules aircraft flies freshly caught Alaska seafood from King Salmon, Dillingham, and other western Alaska locations to Anchorage for distribution around the world.

Lynden Transport

TRANSPORTATION
Cold Cargo
Expertise and careful planning are required to keep things exactly cold enough
By Vanessa Orr
Lynden’s Hercules aircraft flies freshly caught Alaska seafood from King Salmon, Dillingham, and other western Alaska locations to Anchorage for distribution around the world.

Lynden Transport

E

very day, thousands of items are shipped to and from Alaska, but some of them require a special kind of care. Temperature-controlled items, such as groceries, seafood, and pharmaceuticals, need to reach their destinations without being damaged, which not only requires specialized technology but also an expert understanding of how to best deliver “chill or frozen” cargo.

“Examples of chill freight are products such as dairy, eggs, meats, fruits, and vegetables, which often have a shorter shelf life, so it’s critical the supply chain runs effectively to transport these products to market,” explains Steve Hartmann, vice president of sales and marketing for Lynden Transport. “Frozen items are generally less time-sensitive and include things like ice cream, meats, pizzas, vegetables, and quick meal entrees—everything you’d find in the freezer section at the grocery store.

“Seafood is very important to Alaska and can be moved as either chill or frozen depending on the destination, packaging, and service level required,” he adds.

Oil & Gas
Booming Interest
in Nanushuk
North Slope tundra.

JonnyNoTrees / iStock

Oil & Gas
Booming Interest
in Nanushuk
North Slope tundra.

JonnyNoTrees / iStock

Major players explore the formation’s production potential
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
B

oth ConocoPhillips and Oil Search are optimistic about the potential of the Nanushuk Formation on the North Slope following the combined drilling of nine delineation wells over the winter in the Greater Willow and Pikka-Horseshoe units.

“Since taking on operatorship of the Alaska assets in early March 2018, we have gone from 3 to over 130 full-time team members and undertaken a two-rig, four-well exploration appraisal drilling program while continuing to advance the Pikka Development project,” Oil Search Alaska President Keiran Wulff says.

Agriculture
Growing
Green
Alaska’s agriculture industry is ready to bloom
By Sam Friedman
Tomatoes growing in the main Chena Hot Springs Resort greenhouse. The resort uses hot water both to heat the greenhouse and generate electricity that runs grow lights during the winter.

©Javier Villasenor-Gaona | Chena Hot Springs Resort

Agriculture
Growing
Green
Alaska’s agriculture industry is ready to bloom
By Sam Friedman
Tomatoes growing in the main Chena Hot Springs Resort greenhouse. The resort uses hot water both to heat the greenhouse and generate electricity that runs grow lights during the winter.

©Javier Villasenor-Gaona | Chena Hot Springs Resort

A

lone employee arrived in mid-February to turn on a furnace and grow lights in one of the northernmost commercial plant nurseries in North America.

Despite winter weather outside, within a few days it would warm to about 75˚F inside the greenhouse—the right temper-ature for starting begonia bulbs, followed by veggies such as leeks and onions—at The Plant Kingdom Greenhouse & Nursery, north of Fairbanks.

At Plant Kingdom, like other plant nurseries and vegetable farms around Alaska, greenhouses are essential for starting the growing season early to seize the opportunity of the long summer days during the short summer season.

PNW Casino Resorts
PNW Casino Resorts
Play, Relax, Repeat
A

laska doesn’t have any casinos, but for those bit by the gambling bug, casino resorts in the Pacific Northwest are just quick flight away. We have listed below just a few casino resort options in Washington and Oregon.

Washington
Clearwater Casino Resort includes a waterfront hotel, full-service spa, and a casino night life with table games, slots, and dedicated keno and poker rooms. Clearwater Casino Resort is owned by the Suquamish Tribe and located on the Kitsap Peninsula, northwest of Seattle and accessible via road or the Washington State Ferry system. “Indoors and out, the breathtaking property captures the rustic natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest,” according to Clearwater.
clearwatercasino.com

Little Creek Casino Resort in Shelton, Washington, is owned by the Squaxin Island Tribe. “Whether you’re ready to do some serious betting or simply indulge your playful side, you’ll find everything you need to get your game on,” the resort states. The par-72 championship Salish Cliffs Golf Club course is located on the property and has elevation changes of nearly 600 feet “surrounded by natural beauty and no homes.”
little-creek.com

Events Calendar
Events Calendar
Anchorage
AUG
9-11
Ink Masters Tattoo Show
The Ink Masters Tattoo show is a gathering for tattoo artists and body piercing experts to demonstrate their skills and provide their services to Alaska. There will be a free tattoo giveaway daily in addition to a plethora of body modification vendors, tattoo contests, and other activities at the Dena’ina Center.
inkmasterstattooexpo.com
AUG
17-19
Anchorage RunFest
RunFest started in the ‘90s as Humpy’s Marathon, transitioning into being called Big Wild Life Runs in 2008 until the fall of 2015, when the event adopted the name Anchorage RunFest “to lend more attention to our home site, Anchorage.” RunFest includes the 49K, a marathon, a half marathon, a 5K, the Anchorage Mile, and the Kids’ 2K.
anchoragerunfest.org
Healy
AUG
17-18
Denali Blueberry Festival
The Blueberry Festival takes place at Otto Lake in Healy and includes kids’ games, lake raft rides, a dunk tank, a barbeque, dancing, and music.
denalichamber.com
Girdwood
AUG
17-18
Alyeska Resort Blueberry Festival
A celebration of the lush blueberry season, this family oriented outdoor event features live music, berry picking, local arts and crafts booths, tasty blueberry treats, cooking demos, beer and wine garden, hiking and biking, chair massages,pie eating contest, and a blueberry creations contest, all at Alyeska Resort.
alyeskaresort.com
Inside Alaska Business
PDC Engineers
PDC Engineers expanded its telecom and security design knowledgebase with the addition of its first Registered Communication Distribution Designer (RCDD). PDC’s Bryce Mahn acquired the RCDD certification (offered by Building Industry Consulting Service International), a global information and communications technology certification that demonstrates the holder’s knowledge of the creation, planning, integration, and execution of communications technologies.
pdceng.com
ecoATM Gazelle
Alaskans can now sell or recycle electronic devices at convenient kiosks; ecoATM Gazelle introduced the kiosks to Alaska, with initial kiosks to be located at Walmart and Fred Meyer locations in the Anchorage area.

Device pricing is determined by the model, specific condition, memory capacity, and value in the second-hand markets. Each phone is instantly and carefully evaluated using a unique machine vision system, electrical diagnostics, and artificial intelligence system all within the automated ecoATM kiosk.
ecoatm.com

Business Events

August
AUGUST 4-8
KDD 2019

Dena’ina and Egan Centers, Anchorage: The annual KDD conference is the premier interdisciplinary conference bringing together researchers and practitioners from data science, data mining, knowledge discovery, large-scale data analytics, and big data. kdd.org/kdd2019/

August 4-10
GSA Penrose Conference
Juneau: The meeting will balance invited talks, roundtable discussions, pop-ups, and poster presentations about climatic controls on continental erosion and sediment transport. blogs.egu.eu/divisions/gm/
August 18-20
NHA Alaska Regional Meeting
Baranof Downtown, Juneau: The National Hydropower Association (NHA) is a nonprofit association dedicated exclusively to promoting the growth of clean, renewable hydropower and marine energy. hydro.org/event/20357-2/
August 21-23
APA Annual Meeting

Centennial Hall, Juneau: The Alaska Power Association’s 68th Annual Meeting and ARECA Insurance Exchange Annual Meeting, hosted by Alaska Electric Light & Power and Inside Passage Electric Cooperative, brings together APA’s statewide membership for three days of association business, general sessions, speakers, and networking. alaskapower.org

Right Moves

AOGA

Jackson Blackwell joined the Alaska Oil and Gas Association (AOGA) as an Intern. Blackwell is a 2017 graduate of Soldotna High School. Currently, he attends Boise State University, working toward a double major in economics and political science. As AOGA’s intern, Blackwell will conduct legal research, coordinate events, and assist with AOGA’s various initiatives to promote the long-term viability of the oil and gas industry.

Jason Blackwell
Blackwell

ACDA

Anchorage Community Development Authority (ACDA) has named Demetric Tuggle as its new Parking Director. Tuggle, who brings more than twenty years of parking experience, will be in charge of managing ACDA’s parking division, EasyPark. Tuggle created and oversaw EasyPark’s Dispatch Center, Safety First, and the Amenities Program and will continue to focus on customer amenities and care.

Demetric Tuggle
Tuggle

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand?
Our Iceberg Is Melting: Changing and Succeeding Under Any Conditions by John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber. It is the best (and shortest) read on implementing sustainable change in an organization.

What movie do you recommend to everyone?
Any movie with a woman as the super hero! Women do remarkable things every day; it’s nice to see we are playing roles that reflect that.

What’s the first thing you do after work?
Pet my dogs. They hear me coming and meet me at the door every evening.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live?
Kauai, Hawaii.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
An eagle, but only if it doesn’t bite me [she laughs].

At a Glance

What book is on your nightstand?
Our Iceberg Is Melting: Changing and Succeeding Under Any Conditions by John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber. It is the best (and shortest) read on implementing sustainable change in an organization.

What movie do you recommend to everyone?
Any movie with a woman as the super hero! Women do remarkable things every day; it’s nice to see we are playing roles that reflect that.

What’s the first thing you do after work?
Pet my dogs. They hear me coming and meet me at the door every evening.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, where would you live?
Kauai, Hawaii.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
An eagle, but only if it doesn’t bite me [she laughs].

Off the Cuff

Shauna Hegna
S

hauna Hegna has been the president of Koniag, the Alaska Native regional corporation for the Kodiak Island area, since 2017. “Koniag realized a record year this year,” explains Hegna. “It’s amazing what can happen when humble, hardworking, and driven people are inspired by a shared vision.”

Alaska Business: What do you do in your free time?
Shauna Hegna: My family loves the outdoors. In the fall you can find us hunting near my village on Kodiak Island, in the winter we ski, and in the summer we fish and raft rivers all over Alaska.

AB: Is there a skill or talent you’ve always wanted to learn or are learning?
Hegna: I have always wanted to make my own snowfalling parka, a traditional Alutiiq ceremonial dress. One of these days I will sit down and get it done!

Alaska Trends

Alaska Agriculture
Small Industry, Big Results
T

he Land of the Midnight Sun has a reputation for producing massive fruits and vegetables, but over the last few years more and more Alaskans have been looking for local options for every-day-portioned fruits, vegetables, and meats. Alaska’s agriculture industry has fluctuated since its boom during colonization in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, but today is enjoying support from programs such as the $5/Week Challenge issued by the Division of Agriculture’s Alaska Grown Program, which encourages Alaskans to spend just $5 per week from June through October on Alaska produce.

The USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service conducts hundreds of surveys every year about the agriculture industry; we’ve selected some of the most up-to-date data about Alaska agriculture to present here.

Thanks for reading our August 2019 issue!