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August 2020 | Volume 37 | Number 8 | AKBIZMAG.COM

Contents

Features

Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Revenue article

Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Revenue

The past, present, and future of property management
By Vanessa Orr
Regal North Commercial

Problem Solving 101

UA: financial concerns, COVID-19, and new leadership
By Tracy Barbour

A Breath of Fresh Air

Keeping workplace air quality in tip top shape
By Bailey Berg

Piece by Piece

Thinking outside the box with modular building
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Keeping It Cool

Fire suppression systems protect oil and gas operations from going up in flames
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

The Advantages of Aviation

Aerial assets assist resource development projects
By Vanessa Orr
Rotak
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc. 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, Alaska 99503-2577; Telephone: (907) 276-4373. © 2020 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & December issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.

The Advantages of Aviation

Aerial assets assist resource development projects
By Vanessa Orr
Rotak
The Advantages of Aviation artilce

Problem Solving 101

UA: financial concerns, COVID-19, and new leadership
By Tracy Barbour

A Breath of Fresh Air

Keeping workplace air quality in tip top shape
By Bailey Berg

Piece by Piece

Thinking outside the box with modular building
By Isaac Stone Simonelli

Keeping It Cool

Fire suppression systems protect oil and gas operations from going up in flames
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Revenue article

Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Revenue

The past, present, and future of property management
By Vanessa Orr
Regal North Commercial
Alaska Business (ISSN 8756-4092) is published monthly by Alaska Business Publishing Co., Inc. 501 W. Northern Lights Boulevard, Suite 100, Anchorage, 
Alaska 99503-2577; 
Telephone: (907) 276-4373. 
© 2020 Alaska Business Publishing Co. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Alaska Business accepts no responsibility for unsolicited materials; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self addressed envelope. One-year subscription is $39.95 and includes twelve issues (print + digital) and the annual Power List. Single issues of the Power List are $15 each. Single issues of Alaska Business are $4.99 each; $5.99 for the July & December issues. Send subscription orders and address changes to [email protected]. To order back issues ($9.99 each including postage) visit simplecirc.com/back_issues/alaska-business.
Industrial Support Services Special Section
Alaska’s seafood supply chain depends on processing, freezers, and logistics
By Sam Friedman
Alaska Airlines
From Sea to Sale article
Alaska’s seafood supply chain depends on processing, freezers, and logistics
By Sam Friedman
Alaska Airlines
Alaska’s support industry provides the right tools for the job
By Danny Kreilkamp
Advocacy, education, and training support and build Alaska’s industries
By Tasha Anderson
How remote workers ‘fuel up’ while on site
By Amy Newman

About The Cover

When the Alaska Business editorial team discussed who would best represent the Alaska support services industry, we immediately landed on Rebecca Logan, CEO of The Alaska Support Industry Alliance. Her hard work and passion for promoting Alaska’s support service companies is exactly in step with our desire to highlight those companies in our brand new Industrial Support Services special section.

Through her position at The Alliance, Logan spends her time organizing and presenting information to the Alaska business community through the AK Headlamp; working with individual Alliance members on marketing ideas; and advocating for these companies and the industries they serve. While she always has a view of the big picture, each and every company that contributes to the economy in the Last Frontier is important: “One of my favorite members is a small clothing company down in Kenai who provides product to everybody in Kenai, but also specifically provides clothing products to companies like Hilcorp,” she says.

Cover by Monica Sterchi-Lowman • Photography by Jeremy Cubas

From the Editor

Supporting Industry
Kathryn Mackenzie
W

hen RavnAir Group filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in April it caused a ripple effect of uncertainty and anxiety that started with the company’s 1,300 employees and extended to thousands of the state’s rural residents. And understandably so—a global pandemic was already threatening rural villages’ food security, and the airline was responsible for transporting everything from groceries and home supplies to mail, freight, and people to villages and towns all over Alaska.

So when RavnAir grounded its entire fleet and ceased operations, many were left wondering… what’s next? COVID-19 was just beginning to wreak havoc on the economy—and the aviation industry was suffering more than most. But it wasn’t long before Alaska’s support system kicked into gear and Grant Aviation and Alaska Air Cargo stepped in to fill some of the service gaps created by RavnAir’s departure.

Alaska Business logo
Volume 37, #8
Editorial Staff
Managing Editor
Kathryn Mackenzie
257-2907 [email protected]
Associate/Web Editor
Tasha Anderson
257-2902 [email protected]
Digital and Social Media Specialist
Arie Henry
257-2910 [email protected]
Staff Writer
Danny Kreilkamp
[email protected]
Art Director
Monica Sterchi-Lowman
257-2916 [email protected]
Art Production
Linda Shogren
257-2912 [email protected]
Photo Contributor
Kerry Tasker
BUSINESS STAFF
President
Billie Martin
VP & General Manager
Jason Martin
257-2905 [email protected]
VP Sales & Marketing
Charles Bell
257-2909 [email protected]
Senior Account Manager
Janis J. Plume
257-2917 [email protected]
Advertising Account Manager
Christine Merki
257-2911 [email protected]
Accounting Manager
Ana Lavagnino
257-2901 [email protected]
Customer Service Representative
Emily Olsen
257-2914 [email protected]
CONTACT
Press releases:
[email protected]

Postmaster:
Send address changes to
Alaska Business
501 W. Northern Lights Blvd. #100
Anchorage, AK 99503

Northern Air Cargo plane
Keeping Alaska Open for Business
Northern Air Cargo is committed to continuing our cargo operations while maintaining the health and safety of our customers and employees.

Regulations are changing constantly. For the most up-to-date information visit www.nac.aero.

Northern Air Cargo plane tail
Northern Air Cargo is committed to continuing our cargo operations while maintaining the health and safety of our customers and employees.

Regulations are changing constantly. For the most up-to-date information visit www.nac.aero.

Northern Air Cargo plane tail
Education
Problem Solving 101
UA: financial concerns, COVID-19, and new leadership
By Tracy Barbour
T

he University of Alaska (UA) is in the midst of tumultuous times marked by leadership changes, state funding cuts, enrollment declines, and rising costs—not to mention the COVID-19 pandemic, which exacerbated the system’s existing financial problems.

UA’s board of regents has been faced with some tough decisions, including accepting the resignation of UA President Jim Johnsen in June. “The decision regarding a change in leadership was mutual and was made after considerable reflection,” said Board Chair Sheri Buretta in a press release. In mid-July, UA named Pat Pitney as the system’s interim president. Pitney previously worked with UA for 23 years before leaving to serve as the state budget director during then-Governor Bill Walker’s administration. She will lead the university system for the next year or until the board appoints a new president.

However challenging these many recent developments have been for the UA System, it tackles them as they arise with an eye toward the future.

Monique Musick
Education
Problem Solving 101
UA: financial concerns, COVID-19, and new leadership
By Tracy Barbour
Monique Musick
T

he University of Alaska (UA) is in the midst of tumultuous times marked by leadership changes, state funding cuts, enrollment declines, and rising costs—not to mention the COVID-19 pandemic, which exacerbated the system’s existing financial problems.

UA’s board of regents has been faced with some tough decisions, including accepting the resignation of UA President Jim Johnsen in June. “The decision regarding a change in leadership was mutual and was made after considerable reflection,” said Board Chair Sheri Buretta in a press release. In mid-July, UA named Pat Pitney as the system’s interim president. Pitney previously worked with UA for 23 years before leaving to serve as the state budget director during then-Governor Bill Walker’s administration. She will lead the university system for the next year or until the board appoints a new president.

However challenging these many recent developments have been for the UA System, it tackles them as they arise with an eye toward the future.

Real Estate
Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Revenue
Regal North Commercial
The past, present, and future of property management
By Vanessa Orr
O

wning a building requires a big investment in time and money. Someone has to collect rent, fill vacant spaces, handle maintenance issues, and generally just try to keep the tenants happy—and that’s just the beginning.

“A landlord might not be skilled, trained, or have enough time in order to properly manage a component of the property, such as accounting, prepping for taxes, knowing which vendor to call, managing reserves, maintaining records, or acting as a master negotiator,” explains Kassandra Taggart, the president and broker-in-charge of Real Property Management Last Frontier. “They also need to be available 24/7 in case of emergency and be able to keep up with today’s fast-paced technology environment.”

Environmental
A Breath of Fresh Air
Keeping workplace air quality in tip top shape
By Bailey Berg
W

ith the development of COVID-19, a disease that thrives in and spreads easily through indoor areas, it has become increasingly important for workplaces to provide their workers with good air quality.

Nortech Environmental & Engineering and EHS-Alaska Inc. are just two Alaska businesses working hand-in-hand with their clients to make sure indoor spaces are clean, fresh, and—most importantly—safe for employees to breathe for eight (or more) hours a day.

Industrial Support Services
Six Common Air Pollutants
According to the CDC, “The EPA has identified six pollutants as ‘criteria’ air pollutants because it regulates them by developing human health-based and/or environmentally-based criteria (science-based guidelines) for setting permissible levels.” The pollutants that fall under this designation are carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen oxides, ozone, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide.
Carbon Monoxide (CO)
CO is a colorless, odorless gas that’s harmful in large amounts and is generally released when something is burning. According to the EPA, “Breathing air with a high concentration of CO reduces the amount of oxygen that can be transported in the blood stream to critical organs like the heart and brain. At very high levels, which are possible indoors or in other enclosed environments, CO can cause dizziness, confusion, unconsciousness, and death.” CO is commonly produced by fossil-fuel burning machinery, such as furnaces or unvented kerosene or gas space heaters.
Industrial Support Services
© Design Pics RF | Alaska Stock
The A(ssociation) Team
Advocacy, education, and training support and build Alaska’s industries
By Tasha Anderson
T

he editorial team at Alaska Business is happy to present our inaugural Industrial Support Services Special Section. When we were planning the 2020 editorial calendar in 2019, we knew there was some change on the horizon with the introduction of a new special section—we didn’t anticipate that we’d be launching it from our respective home offices. But we took the example of many of the excellent organizations represented in this section and adapted: supporting Alaska’s largest industries requires the ability to accept the circumstances of a project and get the job done anyway.

Industrial Support Services
Made for the North
Alaska’s support industry provides the right tools for the job
By Danny Kreilkamp
avstraliavasin | iStock
H

ere in Alaska—we suffer better than most.

There’s a reason why the people living here are often referred to as the “chosen frozen.” With a notoriously challenging climate and winter that includes nine months of darkness, enduring the Last Frontier requires a special kind of person. The women and men working in some of our most challenging industries are no exception. Fortunately, these individuals can at least rely on having the right tools to accomplish their varied tasks. Without the proper gear, tools, and equipment specifically tailored to meet the demands of working here, Alaskans would struggle, and so too would some of the state’s most important industries.

Companies operating in the support service industry are as diverse as the work itself; these are the retailers, manufacturers, and supply chain-oriented solutions that do business at the intersection of some of Alaska’s most important industries. Industries like aviation, fishing, and oil and gas. The offerings of support service companies adhere to a similar level of variety—with cross-functional products and applications that find homes in more than a single tool kit. Shane Langland and Eagle Enterprises embody such cross-funtionality.

Industrial Support Services
Industrial Support Services
Alaska Airlines
From Sea to Sale
Alaska’s seafood supply chain depends on processing, freezers, and logistics
By Sam Friedman
A

laska seafood takes many different paths to market, but one of the most common paths involves removing fish heads and guts, freezing the fish, and shipping it out of state.

Headed and gutted fish is the single largest category of seafood product produced by Alaska’s fish processors, outstripping more value-added products like fillets, canned fish, and prepared seafood products. Much of the headed and gutted fish is ultimately bound for US markets—but it first travels across the Pacific for secondary processing done mostly in China.

Industrial Support Services
Illustration
Industrial Support Services
Illustration
What’s Cookin’ at the Camps?
How remote workers ‘fuel up’ while on site
By Amy Newman
I

t takes a lot to keep Alaska’s remote worksites running smoothly. Whether it’s transporting goods and materials, maintaining operating equipment, or managing camp quarters, support service companies play an integral role in keeping the mining, oil and gas, and other critical industries open for business.

Perhaps the most vital of these services? Food. Catering camps provide the fuel for a workforce that spends 12-hour days hundreds of miles from home, weeks at a time. Good, hearty food–and lots of it–is what keeps them going.

Industrial Support Services
Industrial Support Services
Directory
ADVOCACY, PERSONNEL, TRAINING & FACILITIES
Afognak Leasing
Matt Thorpe, COO Afognak Native Corporation
3909 Arctic Blvd., Ste. 500
Anchorage, AK 99503
afognakleasing.com
[email protected]
907-222-9500
Lease and sell temporary and permanent remote camp and workforce housing facilities, portable offices, and oil field support equipment. Build to suit mancamp and workforce housing facilities. Provide camp relocation, operations, and management services.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
2004/ 2004 | 28/28
Alaska Executive Search
Paula Bradison, Pres.
821 N St., Ste. 201
Anchorage, AK 99501
akexec.com
[email protected]
907-276-5707
Recruitment and placement of executives and professionals, engineers, technical, accountants, information technology, software development, sales, medical office support, office administration, bookkeeping, and temporary personnel.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees:
1977/1977 | 8/4
Alaska Miners Association
Deantha Crockett, Exec. Dir.
121 W. Fireweed Ln., Ste. 120
Anchorage, AK 99503
alaskaminers.org
[email protected]
907-563-9229
Nonprofit industry support organization for the mining industry.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees
1939/1939 | 3/3
Alaska Oil and Gas Association
Kara Moriarty, Pres./CEO
121 W. Fireweed Ln., #207
Anchorage, AK 99503
aoga.org
[email protected]
907-272-1481
Alaska oil and gas industry trade association.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees
1966/1966 | 4/4
Alaska Safety Alliance
Cari-Ann Carty, Exec. Dir.
2600 Cordova St., Ste. 105
Anchorage, AK 99503
alaskasafetyalliance.org
[email protected]
907-770-5250
The Alaska Safety Alliance works with industry and educators to create, connect and enhance the quality of industry training and education programs in Alaska with the goal of powering the Alaska economy with a skilled and dynamic workforce.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees
1999/1999 | 6/6
Arctic Energy
Greg Porter, Pres.
PO Box 220110
Anchorage, AK 99522
arcticenergyalaska.com
[email protected]
907-382-7772
Founded in 2012, Arctic Energy provides combined heat and power energy solutions and distributed generation throughout Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, and extreme locations, such as Greenland and Antarctica.
Year Founded/Est. in Alaska | Worldwide/Alaska Employees
2012/2012 | 5/3
Construction
Picture of truck
Construction
Picture of truck
Thinking outside the box with modular building
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
I

n a state infamous for long, brutal winters and a short building season, it’s the fortunate construction teams who are able to keep busy year-round. From residential projects in Anchorage to remote camps on the North Slope, companies that create modular buildings are some of the fortunate few with the ability to keep at it rain or shine.

“It’s very common for us to be busy building in February; when others lay off all their staff, we’re just kind of plodding along,” Summit Logistics President Michael Repasky says.

Summit Logistics, based out of Fairbanks, has been involved with modular construction since the company was founded in 1982. The business mostly focuses on commercial and industrial spaces rather than retail or residential buildings.

Transportation
The Advantages
of Aviation
Aerial assets assist resource development projects
By Vanessa Orr
Transportation
The Advantages
of Aviation
Aerial assets assist resource development projects
By Vanessa Orr
ROTAK Helicopter Services
I

n addition to often prohibitive costs, one of the biggest obstacles to natural resource exploration in Alaska is remoteness. There are no roads on which to transport supplies; the nearest body of water might be miles away, making it nearly impossible to barge in equipment. In many cases, planes and helicopters are the only transport options—and even then, there are any number of obstacles standing in the way of a smooth ride in and out of an exploration site.

“If a helicopter company gets a call, it means they can’t use anything else,” says Ely Woods, general manager of ROTAK Helicopter Services, based out of Anchorage. “We can fit into smaller sites and we have vertical takeoff and landing capabilities—airplanes can’t go where helicopters can.”

Spotlight Your Business Online
Charles Bell headshot
By Charles Bell
Vice President of Sales

T

he Alaska Business website has undergone a significant transformation over the last two years with richer content, modern design, and endless opportunities to feature Alaska’s businesses and their news. Those of you who have browsed the articles, press releases, events, and other updates at akbizmag.com have likely noticed the Spotlight Digital Profiles. These profiles feature different businesses located in Alaska: they’re beautifully designed, full of information, and promote the professionalism and quality of businesses in our community.

If you are searching for options to increase your online presence in a meaningful way, ask us about scheduling a Spotlight Digital Profile on your business! It is both affordable and effective and will provide you with 24/7/365 online visibility.

Oil & Gas
Keeping It Cool
Fire suppression systems protect oil and gas operations from going up in flames
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
flukesamed | iStock
Oil & Gas
Keeping It Cool
Fire suppression systems protect oil and gas operations from going up in flames
By Isaac Stone Simonelli
flukesamed | iStock
Breaking Frozen Ground featured image
G

iven the combustible composition of the materials extracted and processed in Alaska’s oil and gas industry, robust fire prevention and mitigation systems that go beyond state and federal code are the rule rather than the exception.

“In the oil and gas industry, you have a lot more hazards or potential hazards that are present because of the nature of the processes that are being performed than a typical commercial setting,” explains Richard Harvey, a fire protection engineer with Coffman Engineers.

“If an owner/operator has a facility that they want to operate at low risk, they will implement a lot more protection requirements to help protect their asset and reduce the risk to that asset.”

Inside Alaska Business
RavnAir Group
Los Angeles–based FLOAT Shuttle plans to purchase RavnAir Alaska and PenAir out of bankruptcy. RavnAir Group received approval for the sale of all twelve lots of assets at its final Bankruptcy Court hearing—including the two Anchorage-based Part 121 passenger air carriers.

“We are extremely excited about today’s outcome,” says Dave Pflieger, Ravn’s president and CEO. “While it is truly unfortunate that we can’t restart our RavnAir Connect Part 135 airline, we are hopeful that the Alaska-based buyers of those assets will hire many of our former employees; and we are thrilled to hear that the FLOAT shuttle team intends to rehire as many of our remaining employees as possible and quickly resume flights to the many vital communities Ravn serves throughout our great state.”

RavnAir announced plans to file for bankruptcy after seeing a 90 percent drop in bookings and revenue due to COVID-19.
flyravn.com

Economic Indicators
ANS Crude Oil Production
428,658 barrels
12% change from previous month
6/30/2020
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources
ANS West Coast Crude Oil Prices
$43.09 per barrel
9.6% change from previous month
6/30/20
Source: Alaska Department of Natural Resources
Statewide Employment
333,087 Labor Force
12.6% Unemployment
5/1/20. Adjusted seasonally.
Source: Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Right Moves
Alaska Public Media
Anne Garrett has accepted an offer to lead Special Development Campaigns for Alaska Public Media. Garrett was previously the philanthropy advisor at The Alaska Community Foundation and comes to AKPM with more than twenty years of experience in the nonprofit sector. Garrett is one of just thirty-nine people in the state to earn her Certified Fundraising Executive certification.
Anne Garrett headshot
Garrett
Alaska Communications
Alaska Communications named Debra Morse as Vice President of Human Resources. Morse previously served as legal counsel for Alaska Communications, most recently as vice president of legal.

Morse provided her leadership as an inaugural member of Alaska Communications’ Women in Leadership Empowerment and Diversity program. She currently serves on the Citizens Advisory Council for Providence Alaska Medical Center.

Alaska Trends

Alaska’s University system aspires to have one of the most diverse student bodies in the nation. To match its wide variety of degrees and programs spread between three separately accredited universities spanning more than a dozen campuses, UAA initiated a process to create a diversity and inclusion action plan in 2016. With many of its campuses located on the traditional homelands of Alaska Native peoples, the UA system is home to a large demographic of American Indian and Alaska Native students. Below is a snapshot of UA’s student population by campus, as well as a brief overview of the university system’s path to becoming the state’s premier educational institution.

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?
Monday Morning Leadership: 8 Mentoring Sessions You Can’t Afford to Miss by David Cottrell.

What movie do you recommend to everyone you know?
I’m a big Braveheart fan; it’s really about heroism and taking on challenges, kind of what we do in construction [he laughs].

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work?
If it’s a weekend, we try to get to our lake place in Willow; but we’ve got dogs [black lab Joey and chocolate lab Kya] at home, so normally we try to get the dogs out and run them around.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, what’s your dream locale?
That’s hard to say because I don’t think there’s any better place in the world than living in Alaska, in my opinion—maybe Hawai’i, on the big island.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
That’s a tough question. Maybe a dog, but they’re domesticated enough already.

Dan Hall posing

At a Glance

What book is currently on your nightstand?
Monday Morning Leadership: 8 Mentoring Sessions You Can’t Afford to Miss by David Cottrell.

What movie do you recommend to everyone you know?
I’m a big Braveheart fan; it’s really about heroism and taking on challenges, kind of what we do in construction [he laughs].

What’s the first thing you do when you get home after a long day at work?
If it’s a weekend, we try to get to our lake place in Willow; but we’ve got dogs [black lab Joey and chocolate lab Kya] at home, so normally we try to get the dogs out and run them around.

If you couldn’t live in Alaska, what’s your dream locale?
That’s hard to say because I don’t think there’s any better place in the world than living in Alaska, in my opinion—maybe Hawai’i, on the big island.

If you could domesticate a wild animal, what animal would it be?
That’s a tough question. Maybe a dog, but they’re domesticated enough already.

Images ©Kerry Tasker

Off the Cuff

Dan Hall
D

an Hall is president of Knik Construction, part of the Lynden family of companies. Hall has been with Knik for twenty-five years. “I was hired on as a grunt, and I think I’m still doing the same job today,” he jokes. Hall says he enjoys working in the construction industry: “Every day is a new challenge… it’s fun working through the challenges that roll in the office. And the people I get to work with and be a part of are a big part of what makes us successful.”

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